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Sundanese Language

Updated on March 30, 2011

Map of Madurese distribution (in green). The homeland of the Madurese is the Madura island, the north eastern of Java

Map of Madurese distribution (in green). The homeland of the Madurese is the Madura island, the north eastern of Java
Map of Madurese distribution (in green). The homeland of the Madurese is the Madura island, the north eastern of Java | Source

Asmarandana-sunda

Asmarandana-sunda
Asmarandana-sunda | Source

Old Sundanese script

Old Sundanese script as used on papyrus scrolls from Century XV - XVII. Several variants of letters and vowel change are not included in the table above.
Old Sundanese script as used on papyrus scrolls from Century XV - XVII. Several variants of letters and vowel change are not included in the table above. | Source

Comparison of the form letter

Comparative form of letters between the Ancient Java Script, Old Sundanese script, and script Sunda Baku.
Comparative form of letters between the Ancient Java Script, Old Sundanese script, and script Sunda Baku. | Source

What words Sundanese

Wayang Golek Sunda. Bahasa Sunda with English and Bahasa Indonesia subtitles.

Sudanese food: Moolah Roab

Sundanese music :Kacapi Indung Cianjuran . Liwung Jaya song

Jaipongan. West Java (Sunda)

Introduction Sundanese Language

Saya Urang Abdi/sim kuring/pribados

Sundanese is one of the major languages of Indonesia, spoken in western Java by about 25 million people. It is a member of the Indonesian branch of the Malayo-Polynesian family of languages. Sundanese is written in both the Javanese script and the Roman alphabet shown below. Sudanese is spoken/used in Indonesia, Language Family:

  • Family: Malayo-Polynesian(Austronesian)
  • Subgroup: Indonesian

Sundanese (Bahasa Sunda, in Sundanese script ᮘᮞ ᮞᮥᮔ᮪ᮓ, literally "language of Sunda") is the language of about 27 million people from the western third of Java or about 15% of the Indonesian population. It appears to be most closely related to Madurese and Malay, and more distantly related to Javanese. It has several types, conventionally described according to the locations of the people: Banten, Bogor,Priangan (Bandung and its surroundings), Ciamis, Kuningan, and Cirebon. Priangan, which cover the most area of Sundaland (Tatar Pasundan in Sundanese), is the main and most-spoken type of Sundanese language taught in elementary till junior-high schools (equivalent to ninth-year school grade) in West Java and Banten Province.

Sundanese can be written in different writing systems, the Sundanese script (Aksara Sunda) and Pegon in historical times, and in modern times the Latin alphabet.Sundanese orthography is highly phonetic (see also Sundanese script). There are five pure vowel sounds: a /ɑ/, é /ɛ/, i /i/, o /ɔ/, u /ʊ/, and two neutral vowels; e /ə/, and eu /ɤ/. The consonantal phonemes (18—but see below) are transcribed with the letters p, b, t, d, k, g, c (pronounced /tʃ/), j, h, ng (/ŋ/, occurs initially), ny /ɳ/, m, n, s /s/, w, l, r (trilled or flapped), and y /j/. Other consonants that originally appear in Indonesian loanwords mostly transferred into native consonants: f → p, v → p, sy → s, sh → s, z -> j, and kh /x/ → h.

Based on the statement above, it is clear that the Sundanese language has only 16 consonants, there are three consonants /f, v, z/ which exist in Sundanese as a result of borrowing words, but naturally they are not Sundanese consonants.

Furthermore, Sudaryat does not mention the phonemes /w, j/ as semi vowels, although as vowels, /w, j/ function as a glide sound between two different vowels, as in the words:

  • Kueh - /ku w eh/
  • Muih - /mu w ih/
  • Bear - /be A ar/
  • Miang - Mi j an/

Phonemes /w/ and /j/ function as glide sounds between two different vowels as in the words:

  • wa - rung
  • wa - yang
  • ba - wang
  • ha - yang
  • ku - ya

Basic grammar >> Root word >> Root verb

English || Sundanese (normal) || Sundanese (polite)

  • eat ==> dahar ==> tuang (for other) ==> neda (for myself)
  • drink ==> inum ==> leueut
  • write ==> tulis ==> serat
  • read ==> maca ==> maos
  • forget ==> poho ==> hilap
  • remember ==> inget ==> emut
  • sit ==> diuk ==> calik
  • stand ==> tangtung ==> adeg
  • walk ==> leumpang ==> papah

Most of active form in sundanese verb are in their root verb like 'diuk' or 'dahar'. Some other depend on first phonem in root verb:

  1. first phoneme in 'd' is eliminated and changed to prefix 'nga' like in 'ngadahar'
  2. first phoneme in 'i' is eliminated and changed to prefix 'ng' like in 'nginum'
  3. first phoneme in 'b' is eliminated and changed to prefix 'm' like in 'maca'

For Negation, (to be written). "Abdi henteu acan neda". (I have not eaten yet.) Explanation: From the above example, "henteu" is used for negative term. "Buku abdi mah sanes nu ieu". (My book is not this one.) Explanation: From the above example, "sanes" is used for negative term. Question : (to be written) >> Dupi -(question), example: Polite-

  • Dupi Bapa aya di bumi? (is your father at home?)
  • Dupi bumi di palih mana? (where do you live?)

To Passive form. (to be written.) "Buku dibantun ku abdi". (The book is brought by me.) Explanation: "dibantun" (to be brought/passive) and "ngabantun" (active) The other examples: "Pulpen ditambut ku abdi". (The pen is borrowed by me.) "Soal ieu dikerjakeun ku abdi". (This problem is done by me.). And Adjectives (to be written). example: teuas (hard), tiis (cool), hipu (soft), lada (hot, usually for foods), haneut (warm), etc.

Prepositions >> Place

English || Sundanese (normal) || Sundanese (polite)

  • above ==> diluhureun ==> diluhureun
  • behind ==> ditukangeun ==> dipengkereun
  • under ==> dihandapeun ==> dihandapeun
  • inside ==> di jero ==> di lebet
  • outside ==> di luar ==> di luar
  • between ==> di antara ==> di antawis
  • and ==> jeung ==> sareng
  • front ==> hareup ==> payun
  • back ==> tukang ==> pengker

Prepositions >> Time

English || Sundanese (normal) || Sundanese (polite)

  • before ==> saacan ==> sateuacan
  • after ==> sanggeus ==> saparantos
  • during ==> basa ==> nalika
  • past ==> baheula ==> kapungkur

Prepositions >> Miscellaneous

English || Sundanese (normal) || Sundanese (polite)

  • from ==> tina ==> tina
  • for ==> jang ==> kanggo
  • There ==> Aya ==> Nyondong
  • No ==> Embung ==> Alim
  • Me ==> Urang Abdi/sim ==> kuring/pribados

Script Ngalagena

Source

Rarangkén the above letter

Source

Rarangkén under a letter

Source

Rarangkén parallel letter

Source

Numerical of Sundanese Script

Source

Introduction Sundanese Script

Sundanese Script Kuna is script growing in West Java in XIV-XVIII Century which was originally used to write the Sundanese language Kuna. Sundanese script Kuna is the development of the script Pallawa modifications to achieve better use of his trademark as papyrus scrolls in the XVI century. There are at least four types of script that bears the name of the Sundanese script, that script Sunda Kuna, Cacarakan Sundanese script, script Pegon Sundanese, Sundanese and Literacy Baku. Of the four types of Sundanese script, the script Sunda Kuna and the script Sunda Baku can be called a similar but different. Sundanese script Kuna is a modification of Baku Old Sundanese script that has been adjusted in such a way that can be used to write the Sundanese language contemporary. These modifications include the addition of letters (eg letter va and fa), a reduction in the letter (eg letter re pepet and le pepet), and changes in the form of letters (eg letter na and ma).

Baku Sundanese script writing system is an adjustment results Sunda Kuna script used to write the Sundanese language contemporary. Baku Today Sundanese script also commonly referred to as the Sunda Script. As disclosed above, the Baku Sunda script is the result of adjustments Sunda Kuna alphabet used to write the Sundanese language contemporary. These adjustments are based on the guidelines include the following:

  • shape refers to the Old Sundanese script so that its authenticity can be maintained,
  • a simple form to be easily written,
  • the writing system based on the separation of word for word,
  • spelling refers to the latest Sundanese for readability.

In practice, such adjustments include the addition of letters (eg letter va and fa), a reduction in the letter (eg letter re pepet and le pepet), and changes in the form of letters (eg letter na and ma). At present, the Sundanese script using Latin punctuation. For example: commas, periods, semicolons, colons, exclamation mark, question mark, quotation marks, parentheses, brackets, etc..

Sundanese script has a pedigree ranging from the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet ==> Font Phoenicians ==> Aramaic Letter ==> Brahmi ==> Pallawa ==> Old Kawi Script ==> Old Sundanese script ==> Script Sunda. This script can be said to have keserumpunan with Balinese script, Batak, Baybayin, Buhid, Hanuno'o, Lontara, Ancient Sundanese, Rencong, and Rejang.

Indonesian traditional music from West Java: Rihanna "Umbrella" - Angklung/Bamboo Version

Indonesian traditional music from West Java: gamelan sunda

Mission Impossible OST Angklung

Lotek: Gado gado’s Sundanese brother

A traditional Sundanese vegetable dish that is both delicious and nutritious goes by the name Lotek. It basically consists of several vegetables such as tahu (tofu), cole, kangkung (waterspinach) and taug (beansprouts).
A traditional Sundanese vegetable dish that is both delicious and nutritious goes by the name Lotek. It basically consists of several vegetables such as tahu (tofu), cole, kangkung (waterspinach) and taug (beansprouts). | Source

Sudanese food: Tamiah

Indonesian traditional music from West Java: kecapi suling, Ayun Ambing

Sundanese Food Recipes: Lotek

A traditional Sundanese vegetable dish that is both delicious and nutritious goes by the name Lotek . It basically consists of several vegetables such as tahu (tofu), cole, kangkung (waterspinach) and taugé (beansprouts). It is added with a spicy peanut sauce and topped with krupuk. Lotek is usually eaten with steamed rice or lontong , sticky cubes of rice that are neutral in taste thus complementing the spiciness.

Material:

  • Drained watercress
  • Long beans cut into pieces
  • Pumpkin jipang chopped
  • Toge
  • Chopped cucumber

Peanut sauce:

  • 7 tablespoons peanut
  • 2 whole garlic fried
  • 8 cayenne pepper
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons shrimp paste cooked
  • 5 teaspoons melted brown sugar + a little water
  • 1 tablespoon tamarind liquid

Complement:

  • Fried onions
  • Crackers

Method:

  1. Steamed or boiled vegetables for a while (except cucumbers) until cooked.
  2. Take care not to get too wilted.
  3. Lift, then flush with cold water. Drain.
  4. Prepare all the vegetables on a serving plate.
  5. Sprinkle with peanut sauce.
  6. Then sprinkle with fried onions and crackers.

Note:
Lotek can be served with rice cake or rice.

Source: Selera Nusantara

Do you know the character of Sunda is this? If not then you are not familiar soil of West Java Indonesia.

Batara Dwarawati Krishna is the king of the kingdom and is a reincarnation of Lord Vishnu, was assigned to resolve any kinds of problems that occur on Earth. Having a weapon that could see Figure Lopian situation in all parts of the world.
Batara Dwarawati Krishna is the king of the kingdom and is a reincarnation of Lord Vishnu, was assigned to resolve any kinds of problems that occur on Earth. Having a weapon that could see Figure Lopian situation in all parts of the world. | Source

Arjuna is The Third Pandawa. Its called The Middle of Pandawa

Arjuna is the third son of Pandu Kunti mother. Called also panengah Pandavas. Living in Madukara, part of the kingdom Amarta. Berparas handsome, much like women. Having a weapon heirloom kris transition, Ali-ali Pasopati Ampal and arrows.
Arjuna is the third son of Pandu Kunti mother. Called also panengah Pandavas. Living in Madukara, part of the kingdom Amarta. Berparas handsome, much like women. Having a weapon heirloom kris transition, Ali-ali Pasopati Ampal and arrows. | Source

Wes Java - Indonesian Map

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