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Learning to Love Math

Updated on May 12, 2015

Math is Naturally Fun

Too Tiny to Measure Up!
Too Tiny to Measure Up! | Source

The Joy of Teaching Math

Math has always been easy for me but it wasn't until I started taking classes to get my teaching certificate that I came to truly love math. Both my mom and dad loved to play card and board games. They taught my sister and me many mathematical concepts while playing these games without even realizing it. Puzzles and patterns, statistics and probability were daily conversations.

Then came school. Math was nothing but numbers written on paper. Easy to do but very boring and seemingly unrelated to life. Breezing through each worksheet, pages of math problems and even finishing the 7th grade math book mid-year, math became a hated subject to be put aside as quickly as possible.

I vowed that the day I graduated from high school would be the last day I ever took a math class. I succeeded in that goal all through college but when I wanted to get my Elementary Teaching Certificate the state of Vermont had other ideas. So I signed up for a summer class in teaching math.

Using Cuisenaire Rods

Math can be found in Cuisenaire Rods
Math can be found in Cuisenaire Rods | Source

Math is More than Numbers

The Day I came to Love Math

The first day of class the professor brought out pattern blocks and Cuisenaire rods. He asked us to play with them. We made patterns. We built walls. We made towers that tumbled down onto the desk with a sound that only natural wood can make. These blocks felt good in your hands with smooth edges and brilliant colors. He started to explain the mathematics behind the structures we were building.

Mathematics is based on patterns and when you build a pattern block wall, you are using mathematics. When you put a Cuisenaire rod that is 2 cm long next to one that is 3 cm long it is the same as the one that is 5 cm long. (2+3=5)

Then he got me completely hooked when he showed us how to play music on the Cuisenaire Rods.

This was math that was alive. Math that made sense. Math that I could use happily and willingly to teach the wonders of math to children.

I wish I could remember this professor's name. I guess at the time the revolution I found in discovering my love of math was more important to me. Now I hope to thank him by passing on this love to other teachers and homeschoolers.

Integrating Mathematics

October Quilt
October Quilt | Source

Math is Everywhere

Mathematics does not have to be taught in isolation.

Math is fun, artistic, musical, historical, scientific, active, something to write home about.

Mathematics can be taught using fun, interactive learning materials as part of unit studies and as an everyday part of life.

All children can learn and enjoy math when given the right materials and opportunities. The best games for learning math involve children working together to discover the mathematical principles behind the activity.

Children should be expected to make up their own math games and play those games with others often.

Math can be enhanced by explaining what you have learned to others and by writing down those explanations in math journals.

What needs to change in mathematical education?

More hands-on learning.

More hands-on learning.

Submit a Comment

  • alicia-kaye 4 years ago

    All my childhood in traditional math classes I was met with poor grades. I thought I really was terrible at math and I couldn't learn it. I excelled in home economics, finance and accounting and shop classes. I could tell you without taking a breath how to measure out enough product to create a green house and I could calculate angles, balance your budget and checkbook without a calculator and bake a mean cake five 4 times the original recipe without blinking and I could budget and shop for a family of seven for a month with next to nothing. It wasn't until I started homeschooling my own kids and that fear of the impending math classes that I realized I was AWESOME at math. Those 'grades' and classes made me feel like a failure but that was because it wasn't relating to every day situations in which I truly excelled. When I would ask the teachers, "when am I ever going to need this stuff, I just don't get it!?!" They would usually tell me, never but I had to learn it, I had to be tested and they had to record the grade. End of story and end of my drive. I stay away from worksheets with my kids and allow them to 'learn' math by LIVING math. Now that the shop classes, cooking classes, accounting classes, MUSIC classes, etc. are being taken out of school and replaced with worksheets and testing on math concepts I can see a pretty significant decline in the way kids do math. Even the simplest math, like counting back change, is nearly impossible for a lot of young people to do now. Too bad the politicians and school boards can't see how important these classes were in teaching people like me how math is applicable in every day life!

  • krislu lm 4 years ago

    Math in quilting? Love that!

  • JoleneBelmain 4 years ago

    Although practicing more will help you learn, I have always found that hands on gives you a better understanding, so that when it comes to the paper and pencils the equations will be a lot easier to figure out because you understand the questions more.

  • srsddn lm 4 years ago

    Mathematical education will be more realistic with more hand-on learning.

  • davenjilli lm 5 years ago

    Math needs to be more practical less forced. We practice the route stuff, like adding in our heads and times tables while doing other stuff, like milking goats or gardening or even driving in the car. Math isn't about writing down the answers on a piece of paper, math is life and offers a true appreciation of God.

  • Lisa Auch 5 years ago from Scotland

    Yes more hands on creative, I worked in a Special Education unit with teenagers who could not count or do their multiplication tables, getting them outside and using our environment worked way more effectively than pencil and paper! their favourite- football teams!

  • Candlemakingsup 5 years ago

    The inclusion of real life situations in the math equations.

  • trippste 6 years ago

    More hands on learning

  • AngelDey 6 years ago

    Those who say paper and pencil are mainly saying kids aren't getting enough practice, but they are getting more practice with hands-on learning. I use "on the spot" teaching with my son when we are at the store or at a restaurant. We add in gratuity and tax or estimate total costs, and do all kinds of calculations. But he wouldn't be able to do all that in his head unless he'd been able to visualize it. And he learns to visualize with the manipulatives we use at home. The hands-on devices to teach math have been a much easier way to show him how we do and use math.

  • Anthony Godinho 6 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    I definitely support more hands-on learning!

  • javr 6 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

    I hated geometry but now wish I knew more about it. Using it to find the exact center of a circle is fantastic and cool. It really helped me when I was building telescopes.

  • SofiaMann 6 years ago

    We have a mathematical mind and the universe is dancing to mathematics

  • carolflett 7 years ago

    I never was able to learn math facts with all the thousands of times we had to do it in math classes. It took figuring out picture ideas like there's the 2 fingers on one hand that are still there when I add another 5 so 7+5=12. I could visualize but never remember isolated facts. My granddaughter has the same problem. I barely scraped through math until they let me use a calculator and then I was top of the class because I understand concepts. But all those years of math torture made me hate the word math.

  • TasiL 7 years ago

    Not a math mom but my husband is.. More hands on learning would be great for kids.

  • myraggededge 8 years ago

    Show them the patterns.

    I hated math as a child; I went to 7 schools and they all taught differently so I was way ahead in English and very, very behind in math. It turned me into a mathphobic. In my 30s I went back to college, fell in love with Excel and begun a tentative love affair with numbers. We homeschool and I love showing my kids patterns in numbers and nature. My son loves doing times tables because it 'makes his brain fizz'.

  • Teddi14 LM 8 years ago

    We need more hand on Math & integration into other subjects. Most kids are visual learners and hands on visual

  • Jan T Urquhart Baillie 8 years ago from Australia

    More quilts in maths class.

  • annetteghallowe1 8 years ago

    Make math relate to the real world

  • EpicFarms 8 years ago

    A-men! I am mathematically challenged, so I'm thinking this would help even me :o)

  • Nancy Tate Hellams 8 years ago from Pendleton, SC

    My dad always said that any math problem could be solved by understanding basic arithmetic. I think he was right.

  • hlkljgk 8 years ago from Western Mass

    i also believe that attention to different learning styles would help make teaching more effective.

  • tandemonimom lm 8 years ago

    Knowing how to solve an equation is useless unless the child understands the concepts behind it, and how and when to apply those concepts in real life!

  • bdkz 8 years ago

    I love math. More hands on learning would be great for kids.

  • eclecticeducati1 8 years ago

    I am so guilty of not doing much hands on math. Next year I'm going to strive to do more!!!

More paper and pencil practice.

Submit a Comment

  • mizrae 5 years ago

    Adding mathematics...

  • mathconfidence 6 years ago

    Viewing Math as an opportunity to learn life skills beyond the Math.

    When people ask When are we ever gonna use this Math? I answer:

    Mental Fitness

    Accountability

    Teamwork

    Horizon

    Hands-on is fine but more paper and pencil practice helps boost skills and confidence as independent learners -- on-line learning can help too!! (like FASTTMATH or www.ixl.com)

  • lingstar 8 years ago

    It's not just paper and pencil learning...it's understanding how to mentally figure out mathematics as well. Beat the Calculator has some nifty resources for that.

  • Michey LM 8 years ago

    I think we have to get read of calculators in schools and learn more about the basics, use the brain to add, subtract and so on

  • Joan4 8 years ago

    Basic concepts and lifetime skills - how to budget, how to buy groceries, how to pay taxes. I am concerned that our children are not learning how to balance their checkbooks! Wish they all had teachers like you!

Teaching Math - Teaching a True Understanding of Mathematics

Telling Time
Telling Time | Source

Numbers REALLY Mean Something

Each day since that class I have found new ways to make math come alive. When we discovered live sand dollars on the beach in Costa Rica to counting buttons with children in a small Vermont school I found that children responded with equal enthusiasm. How their eyes light up with understanding as they see 4 X 6 = 24 after arranging square pattern blocks into a rectangle with 4 blocks on one side and 6 blocks on the other.

Oh, you mean those numbers really mean something?, one child said to me one day.

When I homeschooled my own children I discovered ways to teach even algebra using Cuisenaire Rods and that hands-on approach has made it possible for my daughter to teach children mathematical concepts that her high school teachers and college professors were not able to get across to certain students.

I have found that the hands-on approach gives children the concrete understanding of mathematics that makes abstract mathematics comprehensible.

The Calendar

Calendar Time - Number Corner Math

Teaching Calendar Time
Teaching Calendar Time | Source

Calendar Time Math

Calendar Time is my favorite time for teaching and practicing math facts. The children gather on the rug and play a guessing game to try to figure out the next picture in the math calendar pattern. By careful observation and logical reasoning they, of course, begin to accurately predict the next picture in the pattern.

After turning over the picture of our calendar we work on number sense, place value, odd and even, temperatures, skip counting and more.

I often read books to the kids that illustrate math concepts at this time as well.

Geometry

The Mathematics of Shapes

Pattern Block Exploration leads to an understanding of Geometry
Pattern Block Exploration leads to an understanding of Geometry | Source

Teaching Geometry

At first it could appear that pattern blocks are just pretty colored blocks for playing with but the longer you play with them the more mathematical concepts can be seen.

As you play with your children talk about angles, sides and tessellation. Using math terms will help them as they advance in their understanding of geometry. If you are not sure of the terms, check out some videos to refresh your memory.

Make playing with the pattern blocks a fun activity and just use the terms in natural conversation..

Patterns in Math

Math for Lapbooks - Exploring Numbers in Mathematics

Apple Lapbook
Apple Lapbook | Source

Math is all about Patterns

Math explains the world using patterns. Those patterns are usually represented in math as numbers.

From the beginning of the year we practice recognizing patterns.

  • We make patterns with the days on the calendar.
  • We use red and green fingerprint paint dots to make patterns of apples on the letter A.
  • We line up our shoes left, right, left, right
  • We make clapping patterns clap, clap, snap
  • We create necklaces with bead patterns
  • We collect acorns, leaves and sticks and then turn those into patterns
  • We look at the spirals of sun flowers and pine cones.

Everywhere we look we find patterns.

Writing Numerals

Teaching Numbers - Writing Numbers

Writing Numerals
Writing Numerals | Source

Hands-on Numbers

Learning to write the digits 0-9 can be lots of fun when it is turned into art projects. Try to think of as many different materials as possible for forming the numbers. Children can paint, draw, sculpt or stamp their numbers.

Introduce each of the materials and show the children how the materials should be used, how to get them out as well as how to put them away. Be sure to model this behavior and ask for volunteers to demonstrate the proper use of the materials.

Set out number writing stations and allow the children to choose the station they would like to work in.

Some of my children's favorite materials for writing numbers included:

  • Cooked Spaghetti on black construction paper
  • Colored chalk on a wet blackboard
  • Salt trays with fingers
  • Glue and glitter on cardboard squares
  • Knitting needles poked into construction paper placed over blocks of Styrofoam
  • Play dough
  • Split Peas and glue on cardboard shaped like Knight's Shields
  • Number Stensils, felt and scissors. Trace the numbers, cut them out and glue them onto flags
  • Roll on Deodorant bottles filled with thin paint - Roll the numbers on long strips of butcher block paper

The Four Operations

Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division

First Grade Math with Mrs. Thompson

Adding Kids
Adding Kids | Source

Learning Addition

Mrs. Thompson asked the first grade girls to go to the front of the room. Then she asked the boys to go to the front of the room. Then she told us that 3+2=5. You see, there were only 5 children in my first grade class.

This is the first math lesson that I can remember and the only one that I can remember for years. What was it about that lesson that made it so memorable? I believe that it was the concreteness of the activity.

For years I was always one of the best math students in the class. I was always able to get the right answers but I never enjoyed math. Math never made sense to me. It was just playing with numbers.

Now I enjoy math so much that I collect fun math games and activities on Pinterest and often send post my favorites on my Teaching Math page on Facebook.

Place Value

Pirate Pete's Place Value - Place Value Bulletin Board

Pirate Pete's Place Value
Pirate Pete's Place Value | Source

Pumpkins and Place Value

One day I substituted in a classroom where the children were exploring pumpkins that they had planted at the end of the previous school year. Those pumpkin seeds had grown into long tangled vines, produced blossoms and those blossoms had grown into huge pumpkins.

The amount of math they learned that day was phenomenal.

  • They estimated the weight and compared it to the actual weight.
  • The measured the circumference with strings and then graphed the results by hanging the strings in order of height.
  • The counted the ridges saving those numbers for the day they would learn about the Fibonacci sequence.
  • They measured the diameter and radius of the pumpkins after cutting them in half.
  • Then the began counting seeds.

For me, counting the seeds was the best part.

  • Put ten seeds in a small plastic pumpkin..
  • Put ten small plastic pumpkins in a large plastic pumpkin.
  • Once all the seeds have been counted, count the seeds by 100's tens and ones.

Telling Time

Learning to Tell Time

Learning to Tell Time
Learning to Tell Time | Source

Math is Everywhere

Posting a schedule with both analog clock and digital clock times helps children to learn how to tell time, recognize the order of when things happen and begin to understand lapsed time.

Each day during Calendar or Number Corner Time we would go over the schedule for the day. I had a basket of clocks near the number corner which the children used to show times. At first we would find just one or two times making sure that each of the children were able to put the hands in the correct places. By the end of the year, all of my first graders could show any of the scheduled classes on our chart.

Sometimes a few of the children would even practice their clocks during free choice time.

Posting Clocks and Times

Kindergarten Schedule
Kindergarten Schedule | Source

Measurement

Measuring a Snail

Measuring a Snail
Measuring a Snail | Source

Measuring the World

We measure when we cook and we measure when we construct. All day long we are using measurement to organize our world.

One day we were reading a book that mentioned 100 yards. Do you know how far that is? Neither did we so we got out a yardstick and measured it. We put the yardstick down in front of our house and flipped it end for end 100 times just to visualize how far it was.

To this day, when I think of 100 yards I remember that day and use that memory to visualize that distance.

How else do we use measurement in our daily lives?

  • We measure the amount of gasoline we put into our cars.
  • We weigh the filling we put into our pies.
  • We measure the amount of oil left in the oil tank.
  • We measure the temperature of the sap as we boil it into maple syrup.
  • We measure the height of letters using picas.
  • We measure flour in cups.
  • We measure salt in pinches.

What else do you measure and what do you use to measure it with?


Math Games

Playing Math Games - Probability

Probability and Measurement
Probability and Measurement | Source

My favorite Math Books for Early Grades - Teaching Math the Fun Way

If I could buy just two books for teaching math I would buy Hands-on Math and Count-on Math. They offer practical, hands-on ideas for teaching math with materials that are easily found around the house or are very inexpensive to buy.

These books have ideas that work well in either a classroom setting or when homeschooling and also offer ideas for parents who just want to play with their children.

Hands-on Math is based on Mathematics Their Way by Mary Baretta Lorton. It describes the elements of setting up the Calendar mentioned above and gives concrete examples of hands-on activities for each area of math that is normally taught to young children. Hands-on Math has blackline masters for creating math workjobs as well as elements of the calendar.

Count on Math

Count on Math offers hundreds of math related activities and experiments using items normally found around the house. One of my favorites is setting up a hanging cone with sand in it to watch the pattern made as the sand pours out the bottom.

Math Games

Math Centers
Math Centers | Source

Math can be as simple as a pair of dice!

When my kids were learning math facts we kept a pair of dice on the dining room table. Each time we sat down we would throw the dice to play quick computational games.

  • Each person rolls a die to see which one is greater
  • Each person rolls a die to see which one is less
  • Roll two dice and add the numbers. Write down your sums. First person to 100 wins.
  • Roll two dice. Subtract the higher number from the lower. First person to get to 0 when subtracting from 20 is the winner.
  • Roll two dice and multiply. Add any two digits together. Odd numbers score two points. Even numbers score one point. First person to 20 wins.

Guestbook for the Love of Math - Have you found passion in Mathematics?

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    • JoleneBelmain profile image

      JoleneBelmain 4 years ago

      I was never the best at math, but I always gave it the best that I had... and I loved math and never let it get the best of me when I didn't fully understand parts of it. Math is an extremely important subject (one of the most important)... I try to make teaching my kids math more fun than a chore, it sure helps in the process :)

      ~BLESSED~

    • profile image

      smsr0100451 4 years ago

      I love this lens very much. I also love trigonometry, algebra and calculus. These are my favorite parts of maths in school time.

    • srsddn lm profile image

      srsddn lm 4 years ago

      More and more school children love mathematics now with innovative methods of teaching.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Some math teachers really make students love Math. I wish we have many of them in the grade school.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Creative ideas for teaching math. I was good at math but am so rusty now that I need a refresher course.

    • KandH profile image

      KandH 4 years ago

      Great lens - I've always loved maths and you've done a fantastic job sharing some excellent resources here :) & thanks to you, I now know about Math Day which I will celebrate next year for sure!

    • profile image

      mumsgather 4 years ago

      As always, your teaching resources are impressive. Blessed.

    • profile image

      ohcaroline 5 years ago

      Your passion truly shows in all your work. You are such a blessing to others teaching math.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @eclecticeducati1: why u love math

    • LisaAuch1 profile image

      Lisa Auch 5 years ago from Scotland

      What an amazing amount of fantastic resources you have, I really wish this had been at my fingertips when I was teaching!...lol Blessed

    • MisterJeremy profile image

      Jeremy 5 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      Lots of great ideas here (including one of mine :-)). I'm going to bookmark this page and recommend it to my students' parents for extra math practice at home.

    • lollyj lm profile image

      Laurel Johnson 6 years ago from Washington KS

      I did OK with simple arithmatic in grade school, but math and algebra were mysteries to me.

      I made very good grades all through school, except for math and algebra.

      I prefer not to think about either of them. :))

      But your lens is great. Thank God there are teachers like you who love their topics and their students.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Math has always been a Strong and Favorite Subject of mine, i guess that's why I like you Squidoo Lenses. They just Add up, Lol!!

    • ajgodinho profile image

      Anthony Godinho 6 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Maths is not a fun subject for most, so finding creative and fun ways to teach it is important because ultimately we are going to require to use math in real life. Well done! Wishing you and yours a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year! **Blessed by a Squid-Angel**

    • profile image

      TeacherCaren 6 years ago

      I think it's easier to make math more real and fun in the elementary and middle school grades. Once you reach harder math classes, however, it becomes more and more difficult to make it less about the numbers.

      But hey, numbers are fun.

    • mrvardeman profile image

      mrvardeman 6 years ago

      I also love teaching math and making it fun!

    • javr profile image

      javr 6 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      More teachers should teach hands on math like you did.

    • profile image

      SofiaMann 6 years ago

      Those who suffer with mathematics have a hope. Thanks for the lens.

    • mich1908 profile image

      mich1908 6 years ago

      Fantastic lense! I didn't think that a lense can be made about maths - my favourite subject during my school days.

    • lasertek lm profile image

      lasertek lm 7 years ago

      Wonderful lens! It is good to know that there are people who loves math and would like to teach the subject. Great job! 5*

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Another wonderful lens. Happy Birthday!

      Susie

    • HorseAndPony LM profile image

      HorseAndPony LM 7 years ago

      We have the same creative math lessons and my daughter loves math. This is a great lens. Blessed by The HorseAndPony Angel. http://www.squidoo.com/horseandpony-squidangel

    • Airinka profile image

      Airinka 7 years ago

      I hate math :D!

    • profile image

      poutine 7 years ago

      A beautifully made lens about teaching math.

      I remember my first math book. I totally fell in love with numbers.

      Poutine

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      Great lens, I really enjoyed reading it. 5 stars and favorited! Thank you for sharing.

    • evelynsaenz1 profile image
      Author

      Evelyn Saenz 7 years ago from Royalton

      [in reply to Rajays] Thank you, SquidAngel.

    • ssuthep profile image

      ssuthep 7 years ago

      A Brilliant Lens! Blessed by a Squid Angel

    • Teddi14 LM profile image

      Teddi14 LM 8 years ago

      Excellent lens! I will be teaching math again next year & I will definitely come back here!!!! Please visit my special education lens and add the link to this lens & your other education lenses. I have a number of different categories. 5*'s

    • VBright profile image

      VBright 8 years ago

      Another great lens, Evelyn. Your lenses teach quite a few adults along the way too!

    • CCGAL profile image

      CCGAL 8 years ago

      Math, Reading, and Music are disciplines that stimulate brain growth in children; math & music teach children how to think - both are much needed in our schools. Bless you for teaching. Great lens.

    • verymary profile image

      Mary 8 years ago from Chicago area

      The sixth grade math this past year was already pushing my limits! Relearning concepts in order to help with homework has been good for my aging brain, though ;) Wonderful 5***** lens

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Another great one for you! Glad you were chosen for this prestigious group of Rocketmoms!

    • profile image

      enslavedbyfaeries 8 years ago

      Oh, how I wish I shared your passion for math. Maybe if I'd had a teacher like you I would have been more excited to learn. Brilliant collection of lenses!!

    • evelynsaenz1 profile image
      Author

      Evelyn Saenz 8 years ago from Royalton

      [in reply to EverythingMouse] Thank you SquidAngel!

    • AlisonMeacham profile image

      AlisonMeacham 8 years ago

      This is a brilliant lens. Blessed!

    • evelynsaenz1 profile image
      Author

      Evelyn Saenz 8 years ago from Royalton

      [in reply to a_willow] Thank you, SquidAngel!

    • Mihaela Vrban profile image

      Mihaela Vrban 8 years ago from Croatia

      This is outstanding lens Evelyn! And I see some ideas I'll show to my husband! :) Blessed by an Angel!

    • annetteghallowe1 profile image

      annetteghallowe1 8 years ago

      You have definitely figured out the way to math with a young child...How about a college student!?

    • EpicFarms profile image

      EpicFarms 8 years ago

      Nice lens and some terrific ideas!

    • OhMe profile image

      Nancy Tate Hellams 8 years ago from Pendleton, SC

      Oh me! Oh my! You can even make Math interesting. Amazing. I love your remembering your first math lesson with the old photos. Neat.

    • TreasuresBrenda profile image

      Treasures By Brenda 8 years ago from Canada

      Great lensography about Evelyn and Math; I love the personal writing!

      Blessed by Brenda.

    • Heather426 profile image

      Heather Burns 8 years ago from Wexford, Ireland

      Wonderful,helpful lens. I agree, it would be nice if more teachers were like you! I had an aunt Evelyn and loved her so that's always been a name I love. Math has always been enjoyable to me and I am a loan officer, so I use it every day. 5* lens.

    • hlkljgk profile image

      hlkljgk 8 years ago from Western Mass

      this is a great lens. as a high school math teacher (well, i was :) in a standard public school and an alternative public school, i have come to appreciate the differences in learners and their needs. it's so important to not get stuck in one method which may alienate an entire group of students.

    • NanLT profile image

      Nan 8 years ago from London, UK

      My 6 year old son with Aspergers absolutely loves numbers and is always asking me what X Y equals. I think I am going to get all sorts of good ideas for ways to continue his interest in things mathematical in your lenses. The other day he was asking me about Roman Numerals, and now will sometimes speak to me using those, and he has a basic understanding of binary numbers.

      Way ove rmy head!

    • evelynsaenz1 profile image
      Author

      Evelyn Saenz 8 years ago from Royalton

      [in reply to Joan4] Thank you so much for your very kind words. I would so love to teach teachers. I guess if I was to write my Bucket List that would be one of the things on it. In order to do that, however, the whole direction of education would have to make a big turn toward a kind and gentle look at the needs of children rather than factory testing.

      Until that time, I write my lenses, hoping that I will be able to inspire others to see the delight in teaching children, creating learning opportunities and giving children the time to love learning.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Joan has said exactly what I would have said! Another inspirational lens Evelyn!

    • profile image

      Tarra99 8 years ago

      5* and a very helpful lens...fab resources! Math was never my strong subject...thankfully my eldest is more like his dad...we'll see about the youngest ...

      (I agree with Joan too!) :o)

    • profile image

      Joan4 8 years ago

      Every time I see one of your lenses, I just wish all teachers were as creative and dedicated! lol I am just thankful you are so willing to share your super ideas on line. Would be great if you could teach teachers, huh? Wow!

    • jimmielanley profile image

      Jimmie Lanley 8 years ago from Memphis, TN, USA

      I love how all your math resources are here in one spot, tied together with a wonderful narrative of your own journey through math learning and math education.

    • tandemonimom lm profile image

      tandemonimom lm 8 years ago

      Beautiful and wonderfully helpful, as are all your lenses, Evelyn! (I love that name, my grandmother was an Evelyn!)

    • profile image

      bdkz 8 years ago

      This is an amazing lens with some wonderful ideas. Bookmarked!

    • eclecticeducati1 profile image

      eclecticeducati1 8 years ago

      Great lens! Math is truly a weak point for me. You have a lot of great ideas here.