ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Nakajima Kikka at the Udvar-Hazy Center

Updated on June 20, 2016
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Kikka at the Udvar-Hazy Center, June 18, 2016.A Kikka at the Paul E. Garber Facility, April 1992.A Nakajima Kikka, 1945.The Smithsonian's Kikka at Patuxent River NAS, 1946.An Ne-20 engine at the Udvar-Hazy Center, Dulles, VA, June 4, 2010.The National Air & Space Museum's Kikka at the Paul E. Garber Facility, Silver Hill, MD, July 1983.The Kikka at the Udvar-Hazy Center, June 18, 2016.
The Kikka at the Udvar-Hazy Center, June 18, 2016.
The Kikka at the Udvar-Hazy Center, June 18, 2016. | Source
A Kikka at the Paul E. Garber Facility, April 1992.
A Kikka at the Paul E. Garber Facility, April 1992. | Source
A Nakajima Kikka, 1945.
A Nakajima Kikka, 1945. | Source
The Smithsonian's Kikka at Patuxent River NAS, 1946.
The Smithsonian's Kikka at Patuxent River NAS, 1946. | Source
An Ne-20 engine at the Udvar-Hazy Center, Dulles, VA, June 4, 2010.
An Ne-20 engine at the Udvar-Hazy Center, Dulles, VA, June 4, 2010. | Source
The National Air & Space Museum's Kikka at the Paul E. Garber Facility, Silver Hill, MD, July 1983.
The National Air & Space Museum's Kikka at the Paul E. Garber Facility, Silver Hill, MD, July 1983. | Source
The Kikka at the Udvar-Hazy Center, June 18, 2016.
The Kikka at the Udvar-Hazy Center, June 18, 2016. | Source

The Nakajima Kikka

The National Air and Space Museum’s collection includes a Nakajima Kikka “Orange Blossom”. When Japanese military attaches in Germany witnessed Messerschmitt Me-262 test flights they informed the Japanese Naval Staff of the Me-262’s capabilities.[i] Nakajima received specifications for an aircraft based on the Me-262’s design for an aircraft with a top speed of 432 mph, a 127 mile range with a 500 kilogram bomb load, and 173 miles with a 250 kilogram bomb load.[ii]

Kazuo Ohno and Kenichi Matsumura designed the Kikka. The Kikka’s control surfaces are fabric covered. On August 7, 1945, the day after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, the only air worthy Kikka made its first flight. Lieutenant Commander Susumu Takaoka piloted the aircraft. He attempted a second flight on August 11 but had to abort takeoff. The Kikka crashed into Tokyo Bay which caused damage to its landing gear. The ground crew caused the mishap by mounting the aircraft’s rocket assist engines at an incorrect angle.[iii] That was the last attempt to fly the Nakajima Kikka.

According to The National Air & Space Museum their Nikka was made for load testing rather than flight testing. The engine nacelles are too small for the Nikka’s Ne-20 engines.[iv] The museum housed their Nikka at the Paul E. Garber facility in Silver Hill, Maryland for decades. The Smithsonian housed in its Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hanger at the Udvar-Hazy Center.[v] It has been moved to the main hanger with the other World War II aircraft.


[i] Messerschmitt Me 262: Arrow to the Future, by Walter J. Boyne © 1980 Smithsonian Institution.

[ii] Nakajima J9Y1 Kikka by Francisco Carlos Soldán Alfaro(http://hsfeatures.com/kikkafs_1.htm)

[iii] National Air & Space Museum web site (http://airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?object=nasm_A19610121000)

[iv] National Air & Space Museum web site (http://airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?object=nasm_A19610121000)

[v] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIdFo-TSNZkv

Click thumbnail to view full-size
A P-51 at the National Air & Space Museum.An Me-262 at the National Air & Space Museum
A P-51 at the National Air & Space Museum.
A P-51 at the National Air & Space Museum. | Source
An Me-262 at the National Air & Space Museum
An Me-262 at the National Air & Space Museum | Source

The Nikka’s Capabilities

The Nikka’s Capabilities

The Nikka’s top speed was comparable to a 1944 vintage piston engine fighter. It was about 30mph slower than the Allied 1945 vintage piston engine fighters. The P-51H had a top speed of 487 mph.[i] Despite its smaller size its wing loading was comparable to the Me-262. The Nikka's mission was to be a fast attack bomber. This was to include suicide bombing missions.[ii]

The jet engines slung under the wings meant had better engines become available they could have been fitted to the Nikka without an airframe redesign. The state of Japanese jet engine development at the time made it unlikely they would have developed engines significantly better than the Ne-20 engines. It is also unlikely Japan could have deployed the aircraft in time for the Allied invasion scheduled to begin November 1, 1945.


[i] Fighting Mustang: The Chronicle of the P-51 by William N. Hess© 1970. Page170.

[ii] Hikoki: 1946 (http://j-aircraft.org/xplanes/hikoki_files/kikka.html)

Nikka Comparison

 
Me-262
Nikka
P-51D
Static Thrust or Horsepower
3,960lb Static Thrust
3,528lb Static Trust
1,695hp
Loaded Weight
14,101lb
8,710lb
10,100lb
Max Speed
540mph
432mph
437mph
Rate of Climb
3,937'/min
1,237'/min
3,475'/min
Wing Loading
60'/sq.ft.
61'/sq.ft.
43'/ft.sq.
Range
526miles
1,105miles
2,080miles
Armament
4x30mm cannons
2x30mm cannons
6x0.5" Machine Guns
Source for Me-262 & P-51D: Luftwaffe Fighter Aces by Mike Spick (c) 1996 Source for Nikka: Wikipedia

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      10 months ago

      Thank you for the suggestion. It never occurred to me to attempt such a project. Maybe I should give it some thought.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      10 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Have you ever thought of combining all of this information and making it into a book? It would make a great reference book of the different types of aircraft and how they were used.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      2 years ago

      There will be no pop quizes :-) Thank you for reading. I am glad you find the airplane Hubs interesting.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      As you said, most of the WWII generation is quickly dying off. We owe much to them and it is nice that they have been labeled by Tom Brokow's book as "The Greatest Generation." I am certainly learning more about airplanes than I ever previously knew by reading your hubs. As long as there will be no pop quiz, I am fine. Ha!

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      3 years ago

      Thank you. Yes, the World War II generation did cast a giant shadow and they are riding riding off into the sunset. Hopefully, enough has been recorded about them that future generations will never forget what their story.

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 

      3 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      My father-in-law was a P-51 pilot in WW2, and I'm a private pilot. We sure did enjoy talking flight. I miss him.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      3 years ago

      Yes, they also built a copy of an Me-163 rocket fighter. The pilot was killed on a test flight. Thank you.

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 

      3 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      I didn't know that Japan had a jet in that era. Good Hub!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)