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Twelve Hurricane Preparation Tips

Updated on August 2, 2017
Peggy W profile image

I live in Houston, and I have worked as a nurse. My interests include art, traveling, reading, gardening, cooking, and our wonderful pets.

Hurricane Isabel from International Space Station
Hurricane Isabel from International Space Station | Source

Better to Be Prepared!

Are you prepared for this coming hurricane season? Have you taken all the precautionary steps to ensure the safety of your family?

One time my mother had come for a visit and had to ride out a hurricane with my husband and me in Houston. It was hot and humid and we were without electricity. Fortunately we had enough food and supplies on hand to ride out the storm and aftermath. While it definitely was not fun, it was good that we were prepared in advance of the storm.

These are some of the things that you might wish to prepare ahead of time. Often when hurricanes (also called typhoons or tropical cyclones) occur the stores are crowded with people buying last minute supplies. Some of these things you could have on hand ahead of time and be prepared for other types of emergencies as well.

Bottled water fills an aisle in a supermarket
Bottled water fills an aisle in a supermarket | Source

Good Water Supply

1. Have drinkable water on hand...at least 1 gallon per person daily for anywhere from 3 to 7 days. When a hurricane is approaching, fill empty buckets, bathtubs and other containers with water. This water can be used to wash hands, flush toilets and the like.

We always fill any empty containers as well as our bathtubs when hurricanes threaten. It is much better to have more water on hand than needed than to wish you had more and not have it available.

Prescription Medications
Prescription Medications | Source

Prescriptions

2. Make sure that all of your prescriptions are up to date and that you have a surplus to tide you over until they can once again be filled. That is just good common sense.

Wireless Radio
Wireless Radio | Source

Radio

3. Buy a NOAA weather radio that can be battery or hand operated so that when the electricity goes out you can still hear the latest news and weather reports.

My hubby and I purchased one that can be run on electricity but also run on batteries. It can also be powered by hand cranking it.

There is nothing worse than not being able to track what a hurricane is doing and to wait it out without any notice.

A radio can be a lifesaver!

It can also fill one in on other information when there is a blackout of electricity or perhaps even play some soothing music if one locates a channel playing it.

Horizons Tec HT-747 Emergency NOAA Weather Radio. Solar & Hand Crank Powered, Mobile Cell Phone Charger & Led Flashlight. Paracord Survival Kit Bracelet Magnesium Flint Fire Starter Compass Whistle
Horizons Tec HT-747 Emergency NOAA Weather Radio. Solar & Hand Crank Powered, Mobile Cell Phone Charger & Led Flashlight. Paracord Survival Kit Bracelet Magnesium Flint Fire Starter Compass Whistle

These emergency radios can be a lifeline to what is happening outside. Storms arrive all times of the day and night. Be prepared and be informed! It matters!

 
Various Types of Batteries
Various Types of Batteries | Source

Flashlights, Batteries, Fire Extinguisher

4. Keep plenty of flashlights and batteries on hand and keep your cell phone charged. Candles are also good but only when closely monitored. Personally I like these new battery operated candles. One does not have to fear a fire if the flames from a real candle get out of hand.

The last thing you need in the midst of a raging hurricane is a fire!

By the way, you should already have a fire extinguisher in your home. Hopefully you will never have to use it but should you need it, it can be lifesaving!

Topping off one's vehicle with gasoline
Topping off one's vehicle with gasoline | Source

Full Tank of Gasoline

5. Keep your vehicle tanks full of gasoline in case you have to exit quickly.

When electricity is out, gasoline pumps will no longer function.

It would be nice to know that you could evacuate if needed at a moments notice should that become a necessity.

Keeping extra cash on hand
Keeping extra cash on hand | Source

Important Documents Handy and Cash

6. It is a good idea to keep important documents in a waterproof bag and able to be taken with you in a moment's notice in case you have to evacuate.

7. Keep some cash on hand. You never know what you might have to purchase and banks may be closed.

A Red Cross "ready to go" preparedness kit showing the bag and its contents.
A Red Cross "ready to go" preparedness kit showing the bag and its contents. | Source

Emergency First Aid Kit

8. A first aid kit could come in handy.

Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it!

Swiss Safe 2-in-1 First Aid Kit (120 Piece) + Bonus 32-Piece Mini First Aid Kit: Compact, Lightweight for Emergencies at Home, Outdoors, Car, Camping, Workplace, Hiking & Survival
Swiss Safe 2-in-1 First Aid Kit (120 Piece) + Bonus 32-Piece Mini First Aid Kit: Compact, Lightweight for Emergencies at Home, Outdoors, Car, Camping, Workplace, Hiking & Survival

It does not have to be a major storm or other disaster to happen in which a first aid kit can come in handy.

For day to day scrapes, burns and the like it is nice to have everything in one place that can be accessed easily.

A good idea is to have one in your home and also in your car.

 
Have some extra non perishable foods to have on hand
Have some extra non perishable foods to have on hand | Source

Non Perishable Food on Hand

9. Food. Keep non perishable foods on hand...those that do not need refrigeration, and also a non-electric can opener. Paper plates might come in handy when washing dishes becomes a problem.

Prior to the hurricane hitting Houston, some friends of ours who owned a popcorn store in Dallas had sent us a huge can containing three different types of popcorn.

My mother, hubby and I certainly made use of that while our electricity was out. Of course we also had plenty of other types of non perishable foods on hand, but we will forever remember eating popcorn during that particular hurricane.

Outdoor grill
Outdoor grill | Source

Nice to be Able to Grill

10. Grilling of foods can still be done if one has a gas grill or ones operated with charcoal.

Not only will you enjoy some hot prepared food but food already purchased and held in your refrigerator or freezer will not have to go to waste if the electricity is out for an extended time.

Sound animal disaster preparedness planning should encompass: one week's emergency rations and water; identification tags, leg bands or tattoos; pet first aid kits; and current photos of your animals, filed with your important papers.
Sound animal disaster preparedness planning should encompass: one week's emergency rations and water; identification tags, leg bands or tattoos; pet first aid kits; and current photos of your animals, filed with your important papers. | Source

Pet Care During Emergencies

11. Don't forget your pets! They also need water, food, medications and their immunization records kept up to date. If you have to leave you will want to have leashes and perhaps carriers or cages for them.

Disposable Diapers
Disposable Diapers | Source

Consider Special Needs

12. There will be other important items to consider if you have babies or others with special needs.

The main thing is not to be caught off guard or have to scramble and assemble some or all of these things when a hurricane is predicted. It would be smart to keep many of these things on a year round basis just updating things as necessary to keep them current.

You wouldn't want to run out of diapers for your baby as an example. Would you?

Are you Prepared?

Are you prepared for the upcoming hurricane season?

Do you have other tips regarding being prepared?

Many of these same precautions can come in handy for other weather related events as well such as tropical storms.

If you have other suggestions please leave them in the comment section below. Thanks!

Aerial view of hurricanes
Aerial view of hurricanes | Source

Are you prepared?

Do you have all the things readied in preparation for an emergency?

See results

© 2016 Peggy Woods

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    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Rajan,

      These are all things that hopefully never have to be put into use...but it is better to be prepared than not for if and when emergencies do happen.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 

      3 weeks ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Extremely useful tips which I am sure will come in handy in any emergency. Thank you for sharing.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      3 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      This information of hurricane preparedness is timeless since there is a chance of hurricanes hitting somewhere every single year. This could also be considered disaster preparedness. It applies to other forms of emergencies as well.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      3 weeks ago

      There is hope, then there is reality. At any rate it's good you posted this article.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      3 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      It would be wonderful if Florence would be the last hurricane to hit land masses this season. We still have several months before the season ends and this seems to have been a very active hurricane season this year.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      3 weeks ago

      Hopefully Florence will be the last hurricane to his this season.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      3 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      You are indeed fortunate if you miss much of the severe weather hitting other parts of our country and the world for that matter.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      3 weeks ago

      Thanks. Today was a lovely day. It was partially cloudy, mid-80s, with a light breeze. We tend to get off easy where I am.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      3 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Stay out of harm's way, Robert. That storm has already caused so much devastation!

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      3 weeks ago

      We are starting to get some of the weather here.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      That is so maddening when people take advantage of others during emergencies such as the current disaster taking place because of the flooding from Hurricane Florence. I hope that they catch many of the looters and prosecute them to the full extent of the law. Sadly, some will get away and not be caught.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      The looting has also started.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      They must have canceled that open house at Dulles Airport out of an abundance of caution or some other good reason.

      Hurricane Florence is certainly causing a lot of flooding and the worst is still yet to come according to the forecast. As of this morning (Sept. 16th), one newscast reported that 16 people have already died. The extreme flooding reminds me of Hurricane Harvey in Houston about one year ago. Many people are still in recovery mode. My heart goes out to all the people currently being affected. They will need lots of support for a long time to come!

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      It seems much of the country has gotten a lot of rain lately. Today I was planning to go to the Dulles Airport open house but as I was driving to the airport the sign announcing it had a "CANCELLED" banner on it. We haven't received any rain today but it is overcast.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Stay safe and secure Robert. We have had over a week of rainy days down here but so far have escaped any tropical storms or hurricanes. This is the height of the season so we stay prepared as much as possible.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      It's apparently going on the other side of the Blue Ridge Mountains. It should reach us about Monday night. Right now we have overcast skies from another system.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      Hopefully, by the time it reaches you it will no longer be causing deaths or as much destruction as hurricane Florence is now causing. Take care!

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      They figure we'll get some weather from it sometime Monday.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      Hurricane Florence is being shown live on television right now and probably will be for several days as it is so slow moving. Hurricane Harvey that hit Texas last year was also so slow in moving and that is a major factor in what caused all of the floodings.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      Good point. Right now the track seem aimed at South Carolina.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi again Robert,

      It is not the wind that kills people as much as the storm surge and flooding that comes from hurricanes. The wind will cause trees to fall, power outages and the like. The storm surge and flooding predicted with Hurricane Florence will be devastating according to the forecasts. It is almost too late for people to evacuate if they have not done so already.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      Last I heard they were saying it might track further south than they initially predicted. They seem to be talking more a rain event than a wind event.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      It has been raining a lot here also. I feel sorry for the people who are in the path of Hurricane Florence. It is going to cause much devastation. I hope people are taking the advice to evacuate while there is still time to do so.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      Here they are talking about a rain event. It has already been soggy here. We'll see.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Roberta,

      Hurricane Florence is surely going to cause significant damage. Praying for everyone in its path. Yes, this is also a day of remembrance for all those who lost their lives on September 11th. Thanks for your comment.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 

      4 weeks ago from the short journey

      Glad to see this highlighted again. In the face of Florence and more storms to come this season good tips on being prepared are also in season.

      Dealing with hurricanes is part of enjoying coastal living and it is easy to just enjoy the beautiful days and forget to be prepared for the rough ones. Evacuation orders are such a tough call for authorities working to keep people safe. It is so important for people to realize that hurricanes are unpredictable and individuals must decide ahead of time how they will need to respond to them when (not if) the time comes.

      Thanks again for putting good tips together in this post. That this day is 911 reminds us again that there are many kinds of storms in life to pray about.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Ethel,

      Sadly, many people along the east coast of the U.S. are now preparing for a powerful hurricane that will be hitting in a matter of days. Right now it is a category 4 but may ramp up to a 5 status. It is going to be devastating and will affect many lives for possibly years to come.

    • ethel smith profile image

      Ethel Smith 

      4 weeks ago from Kingston-Upon-Hull

      I cannot imagine having to do this. But there is so much useful information here Peggy for planning for upcoming events it is a handy hub. Thank you

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      3 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Patricia,

      I know that you pay strict attention to tropical storms as well as hurricanes since you live in Florida. It is the same for us who live anywhere near the Texas coastline. Let's hope for the best this year! Many people have yet to fully recover from the damages of Hurricane Ike. Sending good thoughts and prayers your way.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      3 months ago from sunny Florida

      Here I am again....I TRY not to see this but know I must keep the info in the forefront in my mind. I keep many provisions on hand all year but still a reminder is a good thing. Sending more blessings and Angels your way s

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      4 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Dale,

      You would obviously have to really pay attention to the weather forecasts with regard to all kinds of weather conditions (not only hurricanes) since you live on a boat.

      According to the experts we are in for a higher than normal number of hurricanes this year of 2018. We certainly do not need another one in Texas after all the damage from Hurricane Ike. Many people are still not able to live in their homes and are still in recovery mode in the Houston and surrounding areas.

    • GetitScene profile image

      Dale Anderson 

      4 months ago from The High Seas

      This is a topic I spend an awful lot of time thinking about and preparing for. I live on a sailboat out in the ocean so weather dangers are always on my mind. Good article.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      10 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Rochelle,

      I am happy to hear that your son and his wife survived Hurricane Harvey and did not suffer damages. A "hurricane kit" would be an excellent gift. The traditional hurricane season for this area is now over but there is always next year in which to be aware and take precautions when necessary.

    • Rochelle Frank profile image

      Rochelle Frank 

      10 months ago from California Gold Country

      One of our sons and his wife moved to Houston a little over a year ago.. so they got to experience Harvey. They were in a safe area (and have since moved to another safe area closer to their jobs) and were prepared. I'm thinking of sending them a "Hurricane Kit" for Christmas, and will enclose a copy of your article.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      10 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Roberta,

      Experience can be a good teacher but hopefully people will listen to good advice and not have to learn the hard way when it comes to storm preparations. As to the news these days...there seem to be many kinds of storms brewing and not all of them come from Mother Nature.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 

      10 months ago from the short journey

      Actually, we are from there, and it's been a while since we've visited. :) Hopefully the lessons of recent storms will have people interested in preparation tips such as you offer here. Experience is the best teacher. Anyway, the day's news reminded me of this post. There are many kinds of storms one should avoid!

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      10 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Roberta,

      You would definitely know about hurricane preparations since you live in Florida. Predicting them can be hard sometimes unless there are strong fronts moving them in one direction. As you mentioned in your comment, preparation ahead of time is key to a good outcome.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 

      10 months ago from the short journey

      Preparedness is absolutely crucial to a successful outcome when disaster hits.

      Understanding the region and even the neighborhood we live in so we can assess potential danger helps us prepare. For instance, if we live in Hurricane Alley unprepared to evacuate early (as well as unprepared to lose every possession we own) or near volcanoes without ash masks for each family member we have no right to complain if we suffer the consequences.

      Being from Florida I know something of what people from Texas deal with in the unpredictability of hurricanes. Don't the weather channels' declarations about what a particular storm will or won't do make you laugh sometimes? However, we are thankful for community first responders and for communities that come together to help each other during a crises.

      It's important to keep conversations on this topic going and I hope your tips will be highlighted many times over.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      11 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Patricia,

      I am glad that you fared well during Hurricane Irma. Our friends are slowly recovering from the damages of Hurricane Harvey in different manners. It will be a long recovery process for sure! Thanks for the prayers and angels.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      11 months ago from sunny Florida

      Such excellent suggestions Peggy. And as you know many were spared horrors because they did evacuate during Irma here in Florida. We watched in sadness at the devastation that occurred there in Texas and I cried as I read your letters about your friends who lost so much. Prayers and Angels are on the way for them and for you as well who care so much. ps

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      11 months ago

      Yes, it may have more to do with personality than experience.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      11 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      It could be both! If evacuations orders are issued and then the storm turns or is not as powerful as predicted, then the next time people become emboldened and think that they can make it without evacuating. That could be a deadly decision.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      11 months ago

      Yes, I wonder if ignoring evacuation warnings is more a case of inexperience or experience working against people.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      11 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      Some people do not heed the warnings when told to evacuate which is a shame. It places not only themselves but rescuers at risk if they then need assistance. Always better to be safe than sorry!

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      11 months ago

      Do old timers sometimes get overconfident and stay when they should evacuate?

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      11 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      Old timers who have lived in areas like ours generally know how to prepare for hurricanes. People who are new to the area often have to be told how to make preparations in advance of powerful storms. They might know some of this but perhaps not all.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      11 months ago

      Hopefully many people in Texas read and followed this Hub.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      13 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Dale,

      With your lifestyle you are certainly always keyed into weather forecasts because it can make a huge difference.

      The Houston metro area is starting the recovery stages following Hurricane Harvey. Some areas are still flooded. It will take years to fully recover from this and now it looks like Puerto Rico and other islands and then Florida and the mainland is preparing for the possibility of a Category 5 hurricane! That is a scary scenario! Hopefully many people will evacuate and get out of harms way.

    • GetitScene profile image

      Dale Anderson 

      13 months ago from The High Seas

      I live on a sailboat so preparing for bad weather is a major consideration in my life. This was a good article and covered the bases nicely. On my boat I have things like solar powered radios that you can also wind up to charge. My motto, make a list of the things you will need to properly weather the storm, then stick to the list.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      16 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Glenn,

      Yes these tips work for many other types of storms also.

      We have our first tropical storm brewing in the Gulf of Mexico today and even though it is not predicted as of this moment to hit the Houston area, we will be getting a lot of rain out of it. Many parts of our town flood easily if the rains accumulate to many inches in a short amount of time. So this is the season of year all the way through November that it pays to be alert and prepared.

      Thanks for your comment.

    • Glenn Stok profile image

      Glenn Stok 

      16 months ago from Long Island, NY

      Very useful tips Peggy. Reminds me I should get new batteries for my flashlights. Recently I bought a NOAA weather radio. We don't usually get hurricanes here in New York, but some storms are severe and cause power outages. Your tips work for any storm issues.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Genna,

      I just discovered this now because it for some reason ended up in the spam folder. Sorry for the late response. Your additional points are good ones!

      Hi Robert,

      Glad you liked these tips. Better to always be prepared than not!

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      2 years ago

      Good tips, thank you.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 

      2 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Having lived in hurricane territory for many years and experiencing several of these storms (Sandy was the most recent nasty one), I have to say that your preparation list is top notch. I also prefer the battery operated candles since many of the others emit a black soot that will travel through your HVAC system. I can't think of a thing to add to except make sure that your cell phones are fully charged, and that you have keyed in emergency numbers and the call-in numbers for utility companies to report any outages or downed power lines. Excellent hub, Peg.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Au fait,

      Every part of the country has its problems on occasion. Record flooding is making a mess of our city right now. We are OK but a friend of ours in our old subdivision got 3 feet of water in her home. 7 lives were lost at last count. One of the main highways into our area (Highway 6 by the Addicks Reservoir) may be closed for weeks due to high water.

      Hurricane season lies ahead! Glad you liked this and thanks for the share.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 

      2 years ago from North Texas

      Excellent ideas here! We had record snowfalls and lots of blizzards the years our family lived in Boston and without fail everyone would hear the word snow and head for the grocery store literally cleaning the shelves bare where certain items were displayed. It happened every single time. I used to wonder if they used all their flashlights and batteries up every time it snowed. We never lost electricity that I know of.

      Another thing that can happen during a hurricane especially, is that everyone decides to leave at once and everyone is lined up at the gas station. :( Have seen those pictures on the news where traffic is bottled up and the lines are long at the gas stations and some of the stations have even run out!

      In a really bad flood, which is the biggest problem with hurricanes, even the gas may not be working.

      Have been without electricity many a time when I was growing up in the country in Wisconsin. Bad storms, trees down, sometimes flooding. No electricity for days, and that's just the spring/summer. Blizzards in the winter were sometimes pretty challenging too.

      A very useful article with lots of good advice. Will share and also pinning to Awesome HubPages. Hope all is well with you . . .

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Frank,

      We have been through a number of hurricanes and go into action when one is predicted. We pretty well have it down pat by now! At least with most hurricanes there are days of warnings which is good.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 

      2 years ago from Shelton

      Peggy W this is such a useful hub, we don't think of preparation until the last minute, this is a very useful guide.. bless you Frank

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Alicia,

      Earthquakes are certainly scary! Hopefully you won't have to experience a major one in your lifetime. At least that is of little concern where we live. Hurricanes are always a possibility each season.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 

      2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      These are great tips, Peggy. We don't get hurricanes where I live, but we are in an earthquake zone. We are frequently warned that a major earthquake could happen at any time and that we need to take steps like the ones that you describe.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Rachel,

      Nice that you do not at least yet...have to worry about hurricanes. Blessings to you also.

    • Rachel L Alba profile image

      Rachel L Alba 

      2 years ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Hi Peggy, We don't get hurricane's here, not the ones that do damage. Nearby towns do however. I did hear that they are changing their patterns as to where they will appear. I never paid attention to being prepared for one, but now at least I know from your hub. Thanks for the information.

      Blessings to you.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Writer David,

      I did not even know that battery powered fans were available. Will have to look for some. I agree that any kind of a breeze would help on those hot and humid days following a hurricane. Thanks for the tip!

    • Writer David profile image

      Writer David 

      2 years ago from Mobile, AL

      One more thing I might mention....buy as many battery-powered portable fans as you can get and the batteries needed to power them. You would not believe how thankful you will be to have even a warm breeze blowing in your face. I'm been through approximately two dozen hurricanes living on the gulf coast. The aftermath is almost as bad as the hurricane winds. Almost.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Jackie,

      We have actually gone through several hurricanes and have not suffered too badly. Loss of electricity when it is blistering hot is not fun. Listening to the winds can be scary. The time I mentioned with my mother visiting us and the gift of popcorn, we watched a tree in our backyard twist and turn almost hitting the house...then going the opposite direction and almost hitting the fence. It was crooked and leaning after the hurricane was over and we decided to remove the tree.

      Glad that the tornado did not hit your house. Those are really scary! Your husband & kids must be sound sleepers.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 

      2 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Wow, great stuff Peggy! We just never know and should always be prepared. The only thing close to that I have experience (thank God) was a tornado in the middle of the night during a snow storm and it started thundering and lightening and the wind howled and I was so scared but stayed in bed and prayed. I had no idea what it was til the next day. My kids and husband slept right through it!

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