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5E lesson plan: Evaluate

Updated on September 7, 2017

What does it mean to evaluate your students?


Evaluation is the 5th E in the 5E lesson plan model, after the child has engaged, explored, explained, and elaborated, the final step is to access rather or not the student completely understands. There are several ways to evaluate,the teacher can simply have students fill out a graphic organizer where the students are required to write why they choice their answers. When grading their responses the teacher can access rather or not a concept has been grasped or if he or she should reteach. Sometimes if the majority of students need to go over the lesson again and one or two fully understand, well then they need an extension with some higher thinking skills to challenge them. Evaluating is always important in order to efficiently maximize instruction time. I would like to share in depth a few different ways that I assess my students and a few tricks of the trade to help teachers in tested grades.

Evaluations can be purely teacher observations and a checklist. It can be an exit ticket or a writing sample where students reflect on what they learned and how they will apply their new knowledge to real life connections.


Here my students are showing how to represent multiplication different ways. This took about 15 minutes and a few students with special needs took longer and received accommodations to complete their tasks.
Here my students are showing how to represent multiplication different ways. This took about 15 minutes and a few students with special needs took longer and received accommodations to complete their tasks. | Source

Using the exit ticket to evaluate

Exit tickets should be quick and easy to administer. They can be teacher made quizzes, quick quizzes provided by the curriculum, or simply responses to one question posted that ties to the main focus on the lesson. Often exit tickets come right at the end of a lesson once students have completed the learning cycle. At this point the student has been introduced to the concept and they have had an opportunity to engage and explore the content, Furthermore they have been challenged to think and apply the new learning. But how do we know they completely understand what we have taught them? This is where the exit ticket plays a vital role as a tool that can easily be implement from one subject to the next.

How does it look in action?

One of the most popular ways is for students to use a post-it to respond to a hot question posted on the board for the whole group. Students place the note on a designated place on the class wall or on the classroom door as they transition to another lesson or leave the class to another daily activity.

The teacher is able to quickly scan the responses and get a quick feedback as to what percentage of the students understood the concept and what percentage either have misconceptions or are completely confused. He or she can then use the exit tickets during small group and pair groups up to address differential needs accordingly. This is why grouping of students can change often from concept to concept, exit tickets aid teachers quest for checking for understanding!

These are great for all subjects and grade levels and can be multiple choice, open ended responses, equations, models, and just students students' reflections.

It is also a great way for administrators to see the fruits of your labor. Often times they walk into a classroom looking for evidence that effective teaching is occurring, having your students' quick assessments on display is a testament of not only what your are teaching but how students are responding to your instruction.

Turn and talk

Kids love to talk and what better way to observe rather or not your students have learned a concept than to have them discuss what they have learned? Often times teachers focus too much on silence when they could increase their students' results through strategically using what their students like to do to not only formatively assess but to build knowledge. Studies show that 80% of what is retained is what we discuss with others by telling what we know. Teachers benefit by coaching students through their own thinking and challenging the students to elaborate. Also being proximal, walking around during these brief moments of conversation the teacher is able to check for understanding and make mental note of who is struggling. After a few minutes students can be called back to attention and the teacher can quickly take responses through strategic questioning. Also should a misconception be identified the confusion can be addressed immediately instead of letting it continue and having to reteach later.

A student represents an example of elapse time in his daily schedule. Such projects help teachers evaluate students ability to relate to a concept in real life and to see how a child reasons when given a choice to incorporate creativity.
A student represents an example of elapse time in his daily schedule. Such projects help teachers evaluate students ability to relate to a concept in real life and to see how a child reasons when given a choice to incorporate creativity.
Homework example that would be good to use to model effect use of strategies, helping students to evaluate themselves
Homework example that would be good to use to model effect use of strategies, helping students to evaluate themselves
Here my students are working together during workstation rotations. They have a recording sheet to document their work.
Here my students are working together during workstation rotations. They have a recording sheet to document their work.

Using Projects, Homework, and or Workstations and more

Lets face it, in today's classrooms the time teachers have to address each students' individual learning many times is never enough. We must constantly find ways to evaluate students in the least stressful and supportive manner.

Projects

Projects give students an opportunity to extend their exploration of the given concept outside of the actual lesson. Projects done correctly according to a rubric will give a glimpse into students extended ideas about the subject. For example if I want to know how well a child relates numbers to 100,000; I can provide a project where students present examples of large numbers to 100,000 in real life. Parents may help and coach students but attaching questions that require answering and allowing students to present gives teacher an opportunity to see how much a child is able to explain on their own with their examples.

Homework

Requiring students to show their work or explain their thinking on homework is another way to evaluate a lesson and to review a targeted skill.

Instructional Tip: Kids love when the teacher walks around and scans homework samples for the best examples to use as answer guides for checking homework. They get very competitive an will beg for theirs to be used. It really means a lot to them to hear their teacher praise their work and validate their work ethic. Using students' engagement is a resourceful way to really evaluate how they are internalizing their learning. This helps inform teachers also on students' learning styles when the teacher is able to key in on what engages a student most.


Workstations

Workstations should be employed to give students structured practice time. Depending on when they are used they can give students an opportunity to practice a skill just studied or they can give students more time with prerequisites or with reviewed targeted skills. Workstations should have a record sheet such as a graphic organizer for students to document their work. Teachers should either have kids keep their work in a central folder or keep a composition at that station where they can check in on a specific student or group to assess their understanding by looking at their work samples.

Using Hand Signals

A thumbs up and a thumbs down is the quickest way to evaluate during the lesson. Students may place their thumbs up against their chest to be discrete without drawing attention to their choice. Also given kids multiple choice with fingers is a quick way to see a percentage of who gets a concept and who needs more guidance.

Example:

"Show me 1 finger= A, 2= B, 3=C, and 4= D

© 2013 Dominique Broomfield MEd

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