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Evolution in action.

  1. profile image0
    sandra rinckposted 8 years ago

    So I just read this article. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 … 104000.htm

    I guess you can observe evolution in action after all.  The two birds of the same species, both with black feathers but one with a chestnut belly are dividing into new species.

    The article says that when a species stop mating with each other, then effectively they are creating a new species.

    Anyways, as you get down to the bottom of the article, it says that the only gene difference in the two birds is a melanin gene, the gene that gives them their different colors.

    They are different by only one gene which changed their color which is creating a new species.

    Really interesting, you should read it.

  2. JonTutor profile image57
    JonTutorposted 8 years ago

    Sis thats "racism" among birds .... they gotta have a civil rights movement soon.... wait a minute Obama might invite them over for a beer to patch them..... lol Good link. smile

    1. profile image0
      sandra rinckposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah, I was hoping I wouldn't have to be the one to say it. lol

      1. JonTutor profile image57
        JonTutorposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Cheers!!! Thirsty birds prefer.... Samuel Adams. smile

  3. profile image0
    Sidney Rayneposted 8 years ago

    It is interesting....

    As well...look at the evolutionary time scale and do the math....animals have the ability to evolve at a rate of .93 percent per 100 years in some regard.

    When you factor that theory into the number of variances that can occur with simply one gene being substantially different...it is quite amazing that these two birds only have one subtle difference.

    1. profile image0
      sandra rinckposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      SoulJon, lil'bro..lol 

      Sidney,

      Yeah, I was smitten by that.  Just one tiny, seemingly insignificant gene.  big_smile 

      I wish the article would have given a possible environmental factor though.  Prolly be much harder to trace.

  4. profile image0
    Sidney Rayneposted 8 years ago

    Hell yeah...you factor in environmental conditions as well as any possible mutagens....it would be amazing to see what came up.

    1. profile image0
      sandra rinckposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe once we get the air pollution under control the flycathers will morph into giants. lol

      1. profile image0
        Sidney Rayneposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        One can only hope wink

  5. Earthscribe profile image78
    Earthscribeposted 8 years ago

    Great article! It illustrates the transit point I've often pondered -- as in, when is the phase state between species? This bird scenario seems to suggest minimal gene sequence, less than I'd have suspected.

    1. profile image0
      sandra rinckposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I know, and it seems that the transition happens much faster than I would have expected.  Well... they just got lucky to see it happening. Amazing!

 
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