ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Forest Canopy in Western Washington: A Letter to Mom

Updated on March 24, 2020

Yellow Rhododendrons Above the Roof

The yellow rhododendrons above the roof top, and invisible from the ground.  In my experience, yellow is a rare color for rhododendrons.
The yellow rhododendrons above the roof top, and invisible from the ground. In my experience, yellow is a rare color for rhododendrons. | Source

Letter to Mom: The Levels of Canopy at Your House

Dear Mom,

First of all, this is not really a letter. It is an essay that I am posting online about the forest canopy in Western Washington state--up in the mountains slightly, in an area known by topographers as undifferentiated highlands (but, no sword fighting, sorry). So, if you were thinking this was going to be a newsy and cheerful letter, Mom, it will be, but it will appeal to the general bird- and nature-watching community--and not just to you. I'll send you a private email sometime.

And, just to let you know, not all of my essays will be letters to you. This might be the only one. The point of the letter is to answer you about the yellow rhododendrons.

The story is brief: those rhodies grew up against the gutter. We pulled them back from the house with a rope-and-stake system. They still couldn't get any sunlight. So, like everything at your house, they got gigantic and stuck their sticky heads back up above the roof-line. One day I went up in the loft and looked out that little sun roof thing up there, and there was this huge, cascade of yellow rhododendrons.

Quick Quote

"I cannot believe I am encouraging someone in my family, someone older than me, to climb up on the roof and fool around. We are prone to falling while on the ground."

Across the Clearcut

The view from the ground out of one part of Mom's woods across a clear cut and into another part of Mom's woods.
The view from the ground out of one part of Mom's woods across a clear cut and into another part of Mom's woods. | Source

Three Levels of Canopy That I Watched At Your House

That brings me to my point about the forest canopy at your house. Canopy-wise, there are three levels of 'watching nature' that I enjoyed during the decade that I lived there.

The first level is the ground.

The second is up on the lower branches of the trees and on any feeders you might have, depending on your attitude and opinions about feeders.

The third level is the one that I wanted to tell you about--as you can experience those first two from your front window (the enormous bay window that runs the length of one end of your house).


Looks like a 'Deforestation in Africa' Picture

The lone tree shooting up out in the clearing is a glimpse of the battle for sunlight.  It grew this big, with its vegetation all at the top, while it was in the great struggle with the rest of the forest.
The lone tree shooting up out in the clearing is a glimpse of the battle for sunlight. It grew this big, with its vegetation all at the top, while it was in the great struggle with the rest of the forest. | Source

It Is Almost Tropical All the Competition for Sunlight

The reason that the rhododendron story reminded me of your rooftop is that all the plants out there are competing for sunlight. So, the 'tops' of the sometimes-smaller plants go shooting up to above your roof in a lot of places. That means that the birds attracted to those plants when they are shorter (like when you clear a garden and plant one in full sunlight) are going to have moved up above the top of your field of vision from the bay window. And, I do realize that you often go outside to watch birds, and can just tilt your head up to see higher up into the canopy. But, how would you like to do it without tilting your head? And, what is higher up in the canopy that you would see if you did tilt your head up again while on the roof? It boggles the mind! Heh heh.


Mom's House is an Unofficial Sanctuary in the Region

Here is the back 2 acres of Mom's part of the forest, seen from out in one of the clear cuts.
Here is the back 2 acres of Mom's part of the forest, seen from out in one of the clear cuts. | Source

Biggest Bird Sanctuary in the Area

Your property is one of the biggest 'sanctuaries' within about 7 or 8 miles of your house. By that, I mean that the birds that are fleeing from logging, construction, and farming within those 7 or 8 miles, are ending up at your house. That makes for a) fun and diverse bird watching experiences but b) having to be a witness to the struggle for that limited supply of resources. That is a really enjoyable place to live if you want to watch nature. Birds, and bears, and cougars, but mostly deer, at some point or another, come prancing, creeping, flying, and otherwise passing through your yard.


Should Mom Go Up on The Roof?

This article is advising the author's mother to get a ladder and climb up on her roof to do some nature watching. The author is 50. Should his mother go up on the roof?

See results

View From the Roof

The roof top is a great place to watch nature. Stay safe up there by looking at it through the sun roof.
The roof top is a great place to watch nature. Stay safe up there by looking at it through the sun roof. | Source

The Roof is Actually the Middle of the Canopy

You know that from the ground. But, did you know that from your roof, there is a whole other habitat or panorama of habitats to watch. I always wanted to put a viewing platform up there, but it is your house and not mine. So, that would have been rude. Plus, I cannot believe I am encouraging someone in my family, someone older than me, to climb up on the roof and fool around. We are prone to falling while on the ground. If you go on the roof, do it with caution. But you are an adult, and an American, so if you want to do it, do it--even if it is foolish!

Just kidding, but do be careful if you leave the safety of the loft and venture out onto the roof. Also, remember that there are rafters every foot and a half or so. Walk on those and not between them. If you want, we can plan a reunion of your sons to build a platform up there someday. Until that glorious moment, maybe a ladder?


Species of the Tree Top Mixed-Species Flock

  • Golden-crowned Warbler
  • Ruby-crowned Kinglet
  • Townsend's Warbler (rare at Mom's house)
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Chestnut-backed Chickadee
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • (maybe) White-breasted Nuthatch (but probably extirpated)
  • Hutton's Vireo
  • Warbling Vireo
  • Orange-crowned Warbler
  • Brown Creeper

Do Not Get Too Distracted by all the 'Nature to Watch' Up There

The main problem will be that while you are on the roof, you will be incredibly distracted by all of the 'nature' that you can see from up there. And, as I said, it is going to be a whole new group of animals (mainly birds). The birds from the lower levels, some of them at least, do pop up into the various levels of the canopy all the time. They are birds after all. But, the 'treetop flocks' as I like to call them (probably stealing it from my guidebook), rarely visit the ground or the lower branches level that is visible from the ground. When they do, they hide in the bushes mostly. These are flocks of tiny birds, like the Golden-crowned Warbler and the Ruby-Crowned Kinglet. There are also supposed to be woodpeckers (Downy and Hairy are your locals--and Pileated, but not a real flock bird that one). I have not seen woodpeckers with the tree top mixed-species flocks at your house.


Male Western Tanager

Male western tanager perched on a branch close up
Male western tanager perched on a branch close up | Source

Every Habitat Has a Species that Sings in the Treetops

Of course, the very tops of the trees are where the Western Tanager (usually one at a time, with the female off somewhere out of sight) and birds that like to sing to the sun hang out. There was at least one other species where the male like to hang out and sing in the sunlight, while the female was off--probably working, while he lazed around 'on guard duty.' If you know what the other species besides the Tanager is, let me know? An analogue to it in Southeast Missouri habitats, for instance, is the Cardinal. The Stellar's Jay is otherwise the analogue to the Cardinal back in Western Washington, so is that the other species I am thinking about?


Rooftop Events! Robins, Jays, and Hummingbirds!

The jays can be really annoying. But one of the treats you can get up on the roof during nesting season is battles between the American Robins and the Stellar Jays. Batman's sidekick is named Robin appropriately. A Robin guarding its nest is one of the most vicious animals in the woods (see it facing off with that cougar! -- just kidding).

And, speaking of treats, you can also see the full mating flight of the Rufous-throated Hummingbird from up there (I think they are really just called Rufous Hummingbirds, but I conflated the name and description into one word in my head).

In conclusion, mother, I am again concerned about recommending that you climb around on your roof. I have fantasies about coming out there and building a wooden staircase with a railing leading up onto a deck-like platform with benches and viewing stations. It will probably be more like a ladder, with some kick-boards leading up to a extremely-well-braced sheet of particle board. I will continue to imagine the first option until the reality of the second comes about.

Habitat Destruction or Creation: Nature Knows

View of Mt. St. Helens from Mom's House
View of Mt. St. Helens from Mom's House | Source

© 2014 Brice A Matson

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)