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Pollinators

Updated on September 18, 2013

A Little Tribute to Nature's Army of Pollinators

Busy little bees, lady bugs, butterflies, hummingbirds. You see them flitting from one blossom to the next. We all know what they're doing - pollinating! But it's one of those automatic systems nature has in place that we take entirely for granted. This lens was inspired by a challenge, the strikingly beautiful photo of a bumblebee at work, and my own curiosity to learn more about nature's many pollinators. Did you know that bats are major pollinators? I didn't. That led me to think there are many more things I don't know about the magnificent pollination process going on all around us and all around the world.

Photo: Naples News

The Pollinators

NAPPC Logo
NAPPC Logo

North American Pollinator Protections Campaign

Showcasing the World's Five Most Prominent Pollinators

The NAPPC Logo showcases the five most prominent pollinators: bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, ladybugs and bats, which are only representatives of the many varieties of their species involved in pollination. For me it was a starting place to learn about the major pollinators of the world. As I delved deeper into the subject, I even changed my attitude about some creepy crawlers that I felt didn't have much of a useful purpose other than to make some of us feel uncomfortable.

NAPPC Logo: NAPPC

Pollinator Poster

Pollinator Poster
Pollinator Poster
Pollination
Pollination

Butterfly Pollinators

Beautiful, Graceful, Elegant

Butterflies flutter and float, carrying pollen on their legs. They travel long distances and their job is to pollinate over larger areas. They also live relatively long insect lives. Their long legs can reach down into flowers, but can only hold small amounts of pollen.

Learn About Butterflies

Butterflies of the World

Butterflies of the World
Butterflies of the World
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Hummingbird Pollinators

Amazing Powerhouses

Nature seemed to design hummingbirds with specific features to pollinate specific plants and flowers. Their long bills are custom made sipping straws to reach deep down into flowers harder to reach for other pollinators. Their unique ability to hover gives them the the combined capabilities of bees and butterflies when traveling from plant to plant.

Photo: soulseasons

Hummingbirds of North America

Hummingbirds of North America
Hummingbirds of North America
Lady Bug
Lady Bug

Ladybug Pollinators

Cute as a Bug!

Ladybugs serve an important dual purpose in pollinating plants. They eat more pollen than they transfer, so they are suited for pollinating plants that produce a lot of pollen. They also eat plant-damaging insects. Since they are clumsy, they are more suited to wide, open flowers.

Photo: cityfarmer

Ladybug Pollinators

Ladybug Chart

Ladybug Chart
Ladybug Chart
Bee Flower
Bee Flower

Bee Pollinators

Busy and Organized

Bees are considered the most important and well-known of the pollinators. As they seek nectar to nourish their young, they go from one blossom to another in order to gather enough. In this way they naturally carry pollen from plant to plant. They usually pollinate plants within a small area, although they can cover up to a five-mile radius.

Photo: slyvanveterinary

Learn About Bees

Native Bee Pollinator Poster

Native Bee Pollinator Poster
Native Bee Pollinator Poster
Bat
Bat

Bat Pollinators

Who knew?

Bats tend to pollinate larger more exotic blooms, which makes sense since bats are larger pollinators. Bat-pollinated flowers have more nectar to feed the bats. Blooms also tend to be open at night, which also makes sense.

Photo: batcon

Bats of the Western United States

Bats of the Western United States
Bats of the Western United States
Frogs Pollinators
Frogs Pollinators

Other Pollinators

Out of Sight and Out of Mind

My apologies to the lesser known or not as photogenic pollinators. You have to dig deeper to find them. They do not grace the covers of the books on the subject, but are certainly covered on the inner pages. It's fascinating to know that frogs, mice, lizards, flies and even humans are important pollinators of the world.

Photo: davesgarden

The Forgotten Pollinators

How Pollination Works

How Pollination Works
How Pollination Works

Photos used with permission are credited in individual modules. Every other photo on this lens resides in original form in my personal collection.

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    • Anne Dollin1 profile image

      Anne Dollin1 4 years ago

      An attractive presentation of a very important subject! Pollination is a vital process for the ecosystem.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      i dont find what im searching!!!

    • artbyrodriguez profile image

      Beverly Rodriguez 5 years ago from Albany New York

      Pollinators are so important, and don't get much attention. Great subject!

    • Mary Crowther profile image

      Mary Crowther 5 years ago from Havre de Grace

      Love this lens! Blessed!

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 5 years ago

      We have lots of bats in our neighborhood. I knew they were mosquito eaters, but had no idea they were pollinators. It makes sense now, though. There are many shrubs with large, fragrant flowers to attract them. We attract bees with a hedge of trailing rosemary. They love it.

    • iamraincrystal profile image

      Rosyel Sawali 5 years ago from Manila Philippines

      What a lovely lens! I've learned much about pollinators today! ^_^

    • Expat Mamasita profile image

      Expat Mamasita 5 years ago from Slovakia

      Cool lens. I have a regukar hummingbird visitor in my garden

    • Markstuffnmore profile image

      Markstuffnmore 5 years ago

      This is a very informative lens, I new bats where pollinators but I had no idea frogs where!

    • profile image

      Terrie_Schultz 5 years ago

      Beautiful and informative lens!

    • TheBLU26 profile image

      TheBLU26 5 years ago

      This is a great lens! Love all the charts and posters!