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Creative Photography Ideas From Simple Things

Updated on August 2, 2015
LuisEGonzalez profile image

I enjoy photography and have been doing so professionally and independently for over 30 years. Hope you enjoy my hubs!

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https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ | Source
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ | Source

When was the last time that you simply stopped and looked at the most simple of things, especially around your home and started noticing some things that may perhaps make good photo subjects.

There are basically a few little things that you can do that will expand your horizons and start opening up opportunities for things to photograph.

First of all start by slowing down. Just observe everything around you and take a long hard look at even the most mundane of things. Pretty soon you may even start developing images in your head.

When you look at something, no matter how simple this item is, you can start to see the possibilities. It is then that you should get your gear and start snapping pictures.

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Pay attention to how colors blend, how to best use any shadows, how the texture can be capture in an interesting way. In other words look at the subjects in a way that it is seldom looked at.

We tend to look at things straight on and rarely focus on anything that strays from our eye's vantage point (line of sight).

By looking at all portions of it you may begin to see how you can compose a good image by only changing how you look at it and the vantage point (high or low) you use.

The best approach to do this right is to follow these three simple steps:

  • Look at everyday objects from a completely different and unusual angle.
  • Slow down and take the time to look long and hard at an everyday object.
  • Move around to compose an image in a way that is different from its normal viewing angle and pay attention to the difference.

Willing to give this a try?

See results

Pay attention to the colors and where you find them. The picture of the steel drums would have probably been overlooked by 90% of photographers.

Yet they have some striking colors that also work well with each other since each color complements another color within the scene.

Even the brick wall adds interest and even more color saturation to the shot.

The fact that they are present in simple rusted steel drums makes no difference but actually helps add interest and a possible story to the shot.

You can also digitally play with the image and convert it into a HDR (high definition) picture which enhances the overall color scheme.

Source

The idea is to make your subconscious stop and analyze the image further.

If you look at anything the way you normally do, then your brain recognizes, stores the information and typically moves on to the next visual cue.

By using a different approach, thus a different perspective, you are now forcing your brain to stop and try to make sense of what it is seeing.

You will still recognize the image in front of you but because you are now looking at it in a way that you are not probably used to, your mind has to re-focus on it.

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Try different lenses especially ones that allow you to take close ups like a macro. Macro shots almost fall in a class all by themselves.

They offer a view that is rarely seen and often reveal attributes of the subject that most of us might not even be aware of, especially when it comes to textures and minute details.

Do not concentrate solely on one location like the inside or outside of your home.

Your house can offer a multitude of subjects but by venturing outside you can double the number of photogenic opportunities that are available for you to compose your shots.

Abandoned buildings and things can often reveal quite nice images if you look at them with a photographic mindset.

Look for subjects around your house, inside and in the patio. Malls, churches, many facades of buildings, iron works, wooden structures, playgrounds, machinery, and vehicles can often feature interesting shapes and details.

Source

© 2015 Luis E Gonzalez

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    • LuisEGonzalez profile imageAUTHOR

      Luis E Gonzalez 

      3 years ago from Miami, Florida

      alancaster149: Thanks. On rainy days or when I don't feel like venturing out I tend to just take pictures around the house or neighborhood.

    • alancaster149 profile image

      Alan R Lancaster 

      3 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

      Handy, Luis. Back in the days of film I used high speed GAF film (400ASA) for photography on rainy days, using the reflections rather than the actual subject as the 'chosen image'. These days I'll take a picture and maybe 'play' with it on the laptop (including changing the image to black and white or even sepia, as the wife's done).

      I like the choice of images here, particularly the front cinema seats and the brickwork vs lamp in the top image.

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