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'Ghostbusters' reboot: Breaking down the frustrations of fans

Updated on June 15, 2015
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In case you missed it, Chris Hemsworth, also known as the Mighty Thor, recently signed on to play the receptionist in the upcoming Ghostbusters reboot. The film, which will feature Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, and SNL cast members Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones in the lead roles, has drummed up a significant amount of buzz since its announcement.

The buzz in question has been both positive and negative, with the more disapproving views of the reboot (which hasn't even begun filming yet) concerning the casting choices and lack of connection with the first two movies. The announcement of Hemsworth's involvement has refueled the fire burning inside some detractors, and, as per usual, they've taken to social media to express their displeasure.

The thing is, the common complaints I've read online don't make a whole lot of sense to me, considering the fact we're a ways away from the movie being released. Some of the comments people have made the past few days include:

"So instead of it being the daughters of the originals, they are just going to remake the entire film and ruin another childhood film?"

I've never really understood the whole "ruining childhood" argument when it comes to remakes and reboots. Sure, a lot of re-imaginings of classic films and TV shows fail to do the source material justice (i.e. Total Recall), but the fact that the reboot is being made won't just eliminate the existence of the original.

You'll still be able to purchase the first two Ghostbusters movies from stores and the internet, they'll continue to be in heavy rotation on television, and you can still stream them online. Plus, your childhood memories of watching the movies won't be tarnished or stained because you checked out the new one.

As for the lack of connection with the original characters and story, you know you don't have to go see the reboot if that upsets you so much. Not only will you save yourself from becoming frustrated, but it'll spare the rest of the internet from having to hear about said frustration.

"I take it he's [Hemsworth] going to serve as eye candy for the female Ghostbusters? They're trying to make this into a chick flick."

If anything, Hemsworth's role seems to be an ironic response to this common casting practice, as opposed to making the reboot a "chick flick." How many movies do we see feature an attractive woman in a similar, relatively minor role? To go along with that, how many movies fail to utilize those characters in ways outside of focusing on their looks?

Think of Alice Eve in Star Trek Into Darkness: Her only contributions to that film were to serve Captain Kirk's love interest and to randomly show off her lingerie in a scene that was heavily promoted in trailers and commercials, but ultimately had nothing to do with the plot. That's what we tend to refer to as "exploitation."

If a male actor being cast as eye candy bothers you, make sure it's equally as bothersome when the same is done to a female actress. I mean, after all, embracing double standards isn't really a cute look in any situation, so why do it?

"This movie will be s***. 4 horrible female actors filling 3 legendary (and one nobody) male actors' roles. Doomed to fail."

First off, referring to Ernie Hudson as a "nobody" is beyond disrespectful to an actor who has appeared in a plethora of films and TV shows since the 1970's. Secondly, Wiig, McCarthy, and McKinnon have racked up an notable number of major awards nominations and wins among each other, and Jones' rapid rise from writer to cast member on SNL has been impressive.

Long story short, it's apparent that these leading ladies are more than qualified to fill those legendary jumpsuits.

"Is an all female 'Ghostbusters' reboot even necessary?"

Would another sequel with the original cast (minus Harold Ramis, sadly) be necessary? Personally, I don't think so. In fact, the first movie stands alone just fine, and the only reason Ghostbusters II exists is because of its success.

The upcoming reboot is a result of the years of clamoring from fans, and while it may not be exactly what some people wanted, it's a great way to introduce the Ghostbusters to a new, more diverse audience. It's also a stellar opportunity for four talented, funny women to take part in a massive global phenomenon and continue to pave the way for other women in Hollywood to do the same.

So again, you can either go see the movie or you can skip it. That's your decision. But whatever you do, don't knock it it until you try it.

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      Evelyn Williams 2 years ago

      Another great article by Jalyn Cook! Keep those articles coming, love them!

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