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5+ Reasons Jurassic World Basically has the Same Plot as Jurassic Park

Updated on September 1, 2015

Spoiler Alert

In case you couldn't tell, I'm going to be comparing the plot of Jurassic Park to that of Jurassic World, so if you're planning on watching either of these films, go watch them and then come back. If you're wondering how Jurassic World was without spoilers however, you can read my review!

The Jurassics: Park vs. World

This is not a post about what is superior but more of a comparison of the two plots. I'm largely convinced that Jurassic World is a bit of a reboot/sequel. It largely pays tribute to the original film back to the premise of opening a literal park featuring dinosaurs and all the perils that happen with it, largely supported by hubris, genetic engineering, and a series of amusement park rides. What follows is a collection of evidence pieces that compare the two plots from the film.

Both films utilized red flares when drawing the attention of a T-Rex.
Both films utilized red flares when drawing the attention of a T-Rex. | Source

Red Flares

Mainly because it's my thumbnail image (and certainly not because it's not one of my strongest points), both films have their protagonists utilize red flares in order to draw the tyrannosaurus rex to them and send them in a specific direction. In Jurassic Park, Alan Grant (played by Sam Neil) uses a flare to draw the monster away from the trapped children, while in the sequel, Claire (played by Bryce Dallas Howard) lures it out to fight the Indominus Rex.

Both are predominant managers of the park, and both wear white. Coincidence?
Both are predominant managers of the park, and both wear white. Coincidence?

The Person in White

It's very clear who's running the show in both movies. Hammond is clearly the de facto boss in the original Jurassic Park. You can see it just in his attire. He fuels the park and every idea he's thought of is carried out. The only person to disagree with him the IT guy who's looking for a better buyer.

Sure, Claire isn't the owner of the Jurassic World amusement park, but it's undeniable she's the one in charge. Simon Masrani (the inheritor of Hammond's work) doesn't do much more than daydream and ask about the status quo, and by status quo we mean who the dinosaurs are feeling, not numbers in any form. Claire, like Hammond, also wears white and has their siblings' kids come to visit them at the worst possible time.

Hammond also doesn't wear heels, but whatever.

Both wear safari jackets, both are the only protagonists that really use firearms (to little effect), and both are connected pretty strongly to the raptors (for better, or worse).
Both wear safari jackets, both are the only protagonists that really use firearms (to little effect), and both are connected pretty strongly to the raptors (for better, or worse).

The Gamesmen

They're the guys you look towards when everything in the park falls to pieces. They warn all the legalistic management of the dangers surrounding the park and they're ignored until it's too late. Then, they have a plan and venture out with their contemporaries (and the audiences') full trust. Both wear slightly similar clothes, and both become very close with velociraptors.

A few differences sure. Owen Grady (played by Chris Pratt) gets a lackluster romance with the Person in White. Robert Muldroom (played by Bob Peck) has no such luck with Hammond, but does deliver one of the most memorable lines (hint, it's 'Clever Girl'). His interaction with the raptors is less than pleasant than Grady's.

B. D. Wong playing the character Dr. Henry Wu in both Jurassic Park and Jurassic World
B. D. Wong playing the character Dr. Henry Wu in both Jurassic Park and Jurassic World

Dr. Henry Wu

This one's a bit more obvious. Dr. Henry Wu (played by B. D. Wong) appears in both the original film and Jurassic World. While he seems little more than an exposition piece in the first film (discussing raptors and how the dinosaurs were made after Mr. DNA has had his turn), his role is expounded upon in Jurassic World where he was the lead scientist that allows everything to occur in both films, even becoming a bit of an antagonist (it was his manipulations that breaks containment in both films).

Velociraptors totally get him in the book though.

Both sets of 'niblings' protected from the Big Bad by a glass plate
Both sets of 'niblings' protected from the Big Bad by a glass plate | Source

The 'Niblings'

What are niblings? A collective term for nephews and nieces, the kids are relatives to the Person in White, someone who has some capacity of authority over the park. The kids are barely chaperoned and are usually in danger due to the Person in White's negligence.

That being said, one of the two (in this case, the younger sibling) has a fascination with the dinosaurs and knows a lot about them. The older sibling could even be argued (albeit loosely) to be in touch with technology. In Jurassic Park, the niece was computer-savvy, while the older brother in Jurassic World is definitely in-touch with his phone and earbuds.

The scenes shown above demonstrate both encounters the siblings have with the Big Bad. In Jurassic Park, the kids are the first to encounter the Tyrannosaurus Rex where it manhandles their transportation park vehicle before nearly squishing them with nothing but a glass plate in between them. In Jurassic World, the vehicle may be different but it's still a park transportation vehicle and they're pinned by the new apex predator in their first encounter.

Also while this isn't in the movie, the parents of the kids in Jurassic Park are also being divorced, same as the kids in this film are as well.

The Plot Comparison

Source

Jurassic World

  • Builds new theme park on old theme park
  • Creates (hybrid) Dinosaur by splicing Dinosaur DNA with other animal(s)
  • Dr. Henry Wu creates dinosaur whose genetic engineering (a hodgepodge of animal traits) allows it to break specified containment
  • Game Warden (Raptor Trainer) warns this is a bad idea
  • Park's Owner is a powerful idealist, Manager wears white
  • Employee (whatever D'Onofrio is) wants to use dinosaurs for a different purpose (as weapons of war)
  • Dinosaurs are not 'exciting' (hence the need to reveal new hybrid dinosaur)
  • Containment is breached, the Big Bad (Indominus Rex) begins eating people before venturing away
  • Kids run about, adults look for them
  • Ineffectual efforts are made to contain the situation
  • Things get worse (repeat this ad nauseum)
  • By worse, I mean raptors. Things get raptors and that's bad for the humans (many proportionally)
  • Kids are safe and reunited with adults before everyone is cornered by raptors
  • Raptors and Rex engage in battle and main protagonists get out alive

Jurassic Park

  • Creates Dinosaurs by splicing dinosaur DNA with other animal
  • Dr. Henry Wu creates dinosaur(s) with genetic engineering (with sex-changing frogs) that allows them to break specified containment (by mating)
  • Game Warden (Raptor Trainer) warns this is a bad idea
  • Park's founder/overseer wears white and is a powerful idealist
  • Employee (lawyer/IT guy) wants to use dinosaurs for a different purpose (make loads of money)
  • Dinosaurs are not 'exciting' (hence the need to put out goat-bait)
  • Containment is breached, the Big Bad (Tyrannosaurus Rex) begins eating people before venturing away
  • Kids run about, adults look for them
  • Ineffectual efforts are made to contain the situation
  • Things get worse (repeat this ad nauseum)
  • By worse, I mean raptors. Things get raptors and that's bad for the humans (many proportionally)
  • Kids are safe and reunited with adults before everyone is cornered by raptors
  • Raptors and Rex engage in battle and main protagonists get out alive

Not a fan of the original intent, but the comparison does have some interesting scene side-by-sides

Honorable Mentions

Some of these instances and pictures don't really deserve a paragraph. Some are just artistic nods of recognition. Those follow hereafter:

Both sets of main protagonists come across an ill herbivore, the dinosaurs no one's afraid of but everyone feels sorry for. One's ill by poisonous vegetations, the other is wounded by the Big Bad.
Both sets of main protagonists come across an ill herbivore, the dinosaurs no one's afraid of but everyone feels sorry for. One's ill by poisonous vegetations, the other is wounded by the Big Bad. | Source
Both major female protagonists apparently knot their shirts. Frankly, I didn't realize this until I saw this photo myself.
Both major female protagonists apparently knot their shirts. Frankly, I didn't realize this until I saw this photo myself. | Source
Source

Closing Thoughts

Sure, some of this might be willfully seen, and many of them on their own are easily dismissable, but do you agree that the film team made a strong effort to reference the original film that started it all throughout their film? Do you see the plot similarities, the artistic moments? Feel free to disagree in the comments below, or if you have anything else to add to what I've said here, feel free to say so!

Convinced of the Plot Similarities?

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Further Reading

You can read my full review of Jurassic World if you'd like, or check out some of my other reviews of summer films in 2015. Also, you can read about the adaptation of Crichton's book to Spielberg's film.

© 2015 Travis Wood

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    • rjbatty profile image

      rjbatty 

      2 years ago from Irvine

      You are being too kind. Jurassic World is a total reboot of Jurassic Park. I guess Universal was counting on the fact that Jurassic Park was old material and could be re-released with a slightly different veneer. Universal soaked up as much as it could by re-releasing Jurassic Park in 3D, and some people gravitated toward this -- mostly people who had seen the original but were easy hooks for a newly brandished version.

      I actually enjoyed watching Jurassic World -- even though I kept being reminded that this was a re-write of the original. It didn't grab me the way Jurassic Park did -- and this is the flaw with Hollywood do-overs or trilogies (or beyond ... think Star Wars).

      I suppose if someone were clever enough, they could reduce all motion pictures into 50 repeating categories/themes. Nothing is left dead in Hollywood, if it made a profit. Thus the executives keep green-lighting scripts we've seen before in slightly different guises. If they go so far as to do a new depiction of Gone With the Wind, I'll have to turn in my badge because, for me, that would be a step too far.

      We have both read, I'm sure, about the coming collapse of the comic book-related film franchise(s). I guess the industry will string this out as long as the films still earn more than they took to create. You can only do so much in this genre -- and we've probably already seen the best attempts to bring incredibly fictional characters to life. When you get to the point where you have to kill off some characters -- just to make things unpredictable -- you are at the altar of self-defeat.

      There were a few special things that made Jurassic Park unique: Michael Crichton, the author of the whole idea, Stephen Spielberg for having the guts to bring Crichton's concepts to the screen, John Williams for creating an outstanding musical score (as always), the casting -- especially using Richard Attenborough as the guy who wanted to turn a flea circus into something inspiring, and I think Industrial Light and Magic for its advancement in computer-generated cinema. Whoever thought about lighting one of the raptors with digital code was definitely missing his lunch break.

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