ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Midway! Midway! Midway!

Updated on November 18, 2019
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Midway 2019 Theatrical Release PosterMidway 1976 Theatrical Release PosterOfficial U.S. Navy photo 80-G-17054, taken during the Battle of Midway
Midway 2019 Theatrical Release Poster
Midway 2019 Theatrical Release Poster | Source
Midway 1976 Theatrical Release Poster
Midway 1976 Theatrical Release Poster | Source
Official U.S. Navy photo 80-G-17054, taken during the Battle of Midway
Official U.S. Navy photo 80-G-17054, taken during the Battle of Midway | Source

Movie Stats

The move “Midway” opened in theaters on November 8, 2019. The film had a $98 million budget. Starlight Media, a Chinese production company, contributed about $45 million to the movie’s production.[i] “Midway” grossed $17.5 million in its opening weekend. It was the highest grossing for that weekend by over $3 million.[ii] On the second week the earnings dropped to $8.8 million. That was still enough for a second-place finish.[iii]

In 1976 Universal Pictures and The Mirisch Corporation released “Midway”, a movie with an all-star cast. These movies depicted the 1942 battle of Midway. This battle is generally considered the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. These movies cover the battle of Midway, events leading up to the battle, and the times. This article covers the movies and the battle itself.


[i] Wall Street Journal, Hollywood Revisits Battle of Midway-With Backing from China by Erich Schwartzel, November 8, 2019. https://www.wsj.com/articles/hollywood-revisits-battle-of-midwaywith-backing-from-china-11573214401, last accessed 11/9/19.

[ii] International Movie Database, https://www.imdb.com/chart/boxoffice?pf_rd_m=A2FGELUUNOQJNL&pf_rd_p=99ed26bb-89a8-4157-8c78-3cd5b17286cd&pf_rd_r=FN397P33FGE0VKW0N3NZ&pf_rd_s=right-7&pf_rd_t=15061&pf_rd_i=homepage&ref_=hm_cht_sm, last accessed, 11/17/19.

[iii] International Movie Database, https://www.imdb.com/chart/boxoffice?pf_rd_m=A2FGELUUNOQJNL&pf_rd_p=99ed26bb-89a8-4157-8c78-3cd5b17286cd&pf_rd_r=TWQA3SYENNH8SHJG64PP&pf_rd_s=right-7&pf_rd_t=15061&pf_rd_i=homepage&ref_=hm_cht_sm, last accessed 11/17/2019.

Midway 2019

This movie begins in Tokyo 1937. Lieutenant Commander Edwin Layton (Patrick Wilson) U.S. Navy Attaché attends a formal dinner hosted by the Japanese Navy. He has a conversation with Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto points out the oil sanctions could make it difficult for the moderates in Japan to hold back the extremists. Admiral Yamamoto points out he stated Japan couldn’t win a long war against America.

The movie centers around Lieutenant Commander Layton and dive bomber pilots on the USS Enterprise (CV-6). The movie covers the attack on Pearl Harbor and the USS Enterprise dive bombers that were attacked during the Pearl Harbor attack. The movie covered other actions of the USS Enterprise prior to Midway. The movie also depicts the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo.

The movie shows how U.S. Naval intelligence confirmed Midway was the objective for the Imperial Japanese Navy’s next offensive. Midway sent an unencrypted message stating their fresh water condenser was broken. The Japanese navy alerted their invasion force to bring enough fresh water with them. Naval intelligence decrypted this Japanese traffic and took that as confirmation the objective was Midway.

The movie also showed in a Japanese simulation test of the battle plan the Japanese lose. The Japanese altered the test instead of the plan.

In the battle of Midway the film showed the Japanese bombing of Midway. The film depicted the ineffective attacks of the submarine USS Nautilus and the U.S. Army B-26 Marauders. The film showed the Navy bombers and attacking Japanese Zero fighters.

The film didn’t depict American fighters. The film depicted the sinking USS Lexington at the Battle of the Coral Sea and the stricken USS Yorktown at Midway. The film didn’t depict the Japanese bombing these aircraft carriers. The actual combat centered around two pilots, Lieutenant Dick Best (Ed Skrein) and Lieutenant Commander C Wade McClusky (Luke Evans).

All the major American characters were white males. There was Mrs. Dagne Layton (Rachael Parrell Fosket) who told Lt. Cmdr. Layton he needed more sleep. The big moment for Mrs. Ann Best (Mandy Moore) was when she curtly asked Lt. Cmdr. McClusky why her husband wasn’t yet a squadron commander. When Lt. Best stepped away Lt. Cmdr. McClusky told Mrs. Best her husband gives the impression, he either didn’t care if he died or didn’t think he could die. McClusky pointed out either impression doesn’t instill confidence in subordinates.

The film asserts the Japanese murdered ¼ million Chinese civilians in retaliation for the assistance the Chinese gave to the downed Doolittle Raiders. In one scene a Japanese destroyer has two downed U.S. Navy flyers on the deck. The Ship’s captain threatens to throw them overboard if they don’t tell him what ship they came from. A flier asks for a cigarette. He takes a puff from the cigarette then curses at the Japanese captain.

“Midway” gives the reasoning of both Rear Admiral Raymond A. Spruance and Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto for not continuing the battle. Admiral Spruance won a major victory. He felt continuing the battle could result in a defeat. Admiral Yamamoto saw no sense in capturing Midway simply to save face.

Wall Street Journal writer Erich Schwartzel points out “Midway” isn’t exactly franchise material.[i] While this is true there were subsequent naval battles in the Pacific that could be made with a similar style. While “Midway”, “Coral Sea”, and “Pearl Harbor” were covered in many movies, other naval battles haven’t been depicted in major Hollywood productions.


[i] Wall Street Journal, Hollywood Revisits Battle of Midway-With Backing from China by Erich Schwartzel, November 8, 2019. https://www.wsj.com/articles/hollywood-revisits-battle-of-midwaywith-backing-from-china-11573214401, last accessed 11/9/19.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Film footage used in Midway, 1976, Film was stock footage from the Japanese movie "Storm Over the Pacific".Some cast members of Midway, 1976, pose on the USS Lexington in front of an F4F Wildcat.
Film footage used in Midway, 1976, Film was stock footage from the Japanese movie "Storm Over the Pacific".
Film footage used in Midway, 1976, Film was stock footage from the Japanese movie "Storm Over the Pacific". | Source
Some cast members of Midway, 1976, pose on the USS Lexington in front of an F4F Wildcat.
Some cast members of Midway, 1976, pose on the USS Lexington in front of an F4F Wildcat. | Source

Midway 1976

This movie used the docudrama format of the 1970 movie “Tora! Tora! Tora!”. The movie was not well received by critics. “Midway” runs 132 minutes and is clearly inferior to “Tora! Tora! Tora!”. “Midway” used some film clips from “Tora! Tora! Tora!”. “Midway” also used stock footage that amuses and annoys aviation buffs, people who are most likely to watch the film. The stock footage was often of the wrong type of aircraft. The most egregious example was an exploding F9F Panther. The Panther was a jet fighter-bomber that didn’t make its first flight until 1947. The F9F film footage was of a crash, ironically on the USS Midway, on June 23, 1951. Unlike the pilot in the movie, Commander George Duncan survived the crash. The footage was also used in the movies “Men of the Fighting Lady” and “The Hunt for Red October”.[i]

The movie begins just before the Battle of the Coral Sea. It covers the battle in detail. After the battle the Japanese proceed with their plans for capturing Midway. The concept is Midway was so important to America the U.S. Navy would have to send their remaining carriers against Midway. This would enable the Japanese Navy to sink the two available carriers. The Japanese believed the USS Yorktown was so heavily damaged at Coral Sea it wouldn’t be ready for combat for months.

The American intelligence is trying to figure out where the Japanese Navy will strike next. Intelligence believes the target is Midway but the evidence is flimsy. Intelligence decides to use the freshwater condenser ruse to prove the target is Midway. The ruse works and the Navy decides to perform makeshift repairs on USS Yorktown so three carriers would be ready for the battle.

A subplot is Captain Matt Garth’s (Charlton Heston) son, Lieutenant Tom Garth (Edward Albert), is in love with Haruko Sakura (Christina Kokubo), a woman whose parents are Japanese. The Sakura’s are at risk of being sent to internment camps. Haruko points out they aren’t sending German or Italian Americans to internment camps. Captain Garth had a friend check the files on Sakura’s family. She belonged to some Japanese nationalist organizations and her father subscribed to a paper that was Japanese propaganda. Haruko explained to Garth she was enrolled into these organizations as a child and wasn’t active in them. Her father was once indebted to the man who owned the paper so he subscribed to the paper even though her father believed the paper was just Japanese propaganda.

The movie depicts the reconnaissance aircraft spotting the opposing fleets. The movie covers the Japanese bombing of Midway, including the air battle between the U.S. Marine fighters and the Japanese Navy aircraft. It gives a blow by blow depiction of attacks on the aircraft carriers.


[i] This is the Most Famous Ramp Strike in (Movie) History by Dario Leone, November 11, 2017, https://theaviationgeekclub.com/famous-ramp-strike-movie-history/, last accessed 11/10/19.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Midway Island, 1941The USS Yorktown at Pearl Harbor 1941.The Japanese Carrier Akagi, April 1942.The Japanese carrier Hiryu under attack from B-17s, June 4, 1942.Ensign George Gay, right, poses in front of a Devastator, May 1942.VT-6 Devastators preparing for takeoff from the USS Enterprise during the Battle of Midway.The USS Yorktown struck by a torpedo dropped by a Nakajima B5N.The Japanese carrier Hiryu on fire, June 5, 1942.The Japanese cruiser Mikuma sinking, June 6, 1942.A US Airman rescued by a PBY during the battle of Midway.Japanese sailors from the Hiryu rescued by the USS Ballard.An SBD-2 that was heavily damaged during the attack on the Hiryu at the Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida.The Midway Memorial
Midway Island, 1941
Midway Island, 1941 | Source
The USS Yorktown at Pearl Harbor 1941.
The USS Yorktown at Pearl Harbor 1941. | Source
The Japanese Carrier Akagi, April 1942.
The Japanese Carrier Akagi, April 1942. | Source
The Japanese carrier Hiryu under attack from B-17s, June 4, 1942.
The Japanese carrier Hiryu under attack from B-17s, June 4, 1942. | Source
Ensign George Gay, right, poses in front of a Devastator, May 1942.
Ensign George Gay, right, poses in front of a Devastator, May 1942. | Source
VT-6 Devastators preparing for takeoff from the USS Enterprise during the Battle of Midway.
VT-6 Devastators preparing for takeoff from the USS Enterprise during the Battle of Midway. | Source
The USS Yorktown struck by a torpedo dropped by a Nakajima B5N.
The USS Yorktown struck by a torpedo dropped by a Nakajima B5N. | Source
The Japanese carrier Hiryu on fire, June 5, 1942.
The Japanese carrier Hiryu on fire, June 5, 1942. | Source
The Japanese cruiser Mikuma sinking, June 6, 1942.
The Japanese cruiser Mikuma sinking, June 6, 1942. | Source
A US Airman rescued by a PBY during the battle of Midway.
A US Airman rescued by a PBY during the battle of Midway. | Source
Japanese sailors from the Hiryu rescued by the USS Ballard.
Japanese sailors from the Hiryu rescued by the USS Ballard. | Source
An SBD-2 that was heavily damaged during the attack on the Hiryu at the Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida.
An SBD-2 that was heavily damaged during the attack on the Hiryu at the Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida. | Source
The Midway Memorial
The Midway Memorial | Source

The Battle of Midway – June 1942

While the Japanese ships were on their way to Midway Admiral Yamamoto received intelligence there were American carriers in the area. Admiral Yamamoto decided not to break radio silence to inform Admiral Nagumo, the head of the carrier fleet. The Japanese suspected, correctly, the Americans were listening in on Japanese transmissions.

The U.S. Navy sent out PBY Catalinas on reconnaissance missions. At 09:04 a PBY Catalina, piloted by Ensign James P.O. Lyle, spotted the minesweepers “Tama Maru No. 3” and “Tama Maru No. 5”. These minesweepers were part of the invasion force. Ensign Jack Reid, a Catalina pilot, spotted Japanese ships at 09:25. These ships were of the Japanese invasion force, commanded by Admiral Nobutake Kondo. Midway launched 9 United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) B-17s. The B-17s attacked the invasion force but caused no damage or casualties. Admiral Knodo didn’t inform Admiral Nagumo of the B-17 attack.[i] That night 4 U.S. Navy PBY-5A Catalina bombers attacked the invasion force. A torpedo struck the oiler “Akebono Maru” with a torpedo. The “Akebono Maru” was able to stay with the invasion fleet.[ii]

The next morning 15 USAAF B-17s from Midway are sent out on an armed reconnaissance mission. Shortly after the B-17s flee from Midway the Japanese carrier force launched 108 aircraft to attack Midway Island. The U.S. launched 6 U.S. Navy TBF Avengers, 4 USAAF B-26 Marauders, 16 United States Marine Corps (USMC) SBD-2 Dauntlesses, and 11 USMC SB2U Vindicators. The Japanese aircraft reach Midway Island at 05:56. Midway launches its USMC F2A Buffalo and F4F Wildcat fighters. These fighters engage the Japanese aircraft at 06:16. The Japanese shot down 17 American fighters. The USMC fighter squadron’s commanding officer, Major Floyd B. Parks, was among those shot down and killed. The Japanese attack ends at 06:43. The attack set some oil tanks and buildings on fire.[iii] The Japanese lost 11 aircraft and another 14 were damaged enough to keep them out of the fight. At 07:05 the Japanese attack commander, Lieutenant Joichi Tomonaga, radioed that another attack is needed on Midway Island. Six U.S. Navy TBF Avengers and 4 USAAF B-26 Marauders from Midway attack the Japanese carrier fleet at 07:10. The Japanese shot down 5 Avengers and 2 Marauders. One B-26 was damaged and may have attempted to crash into the Akagi. The Japanese lost two Zero fighters. The Japanese spot a submarine, the USS Nautilus. At 07:15 Admiral Nagumo decided to rearm his aircraft for a second attack on Midway. At 07:28 a Japanese reconnaissance aircraft, Tone No. 4, spots and reports seeing 10 American ships. Admiral Nagumo reverses his rearm order. The U.S. carriers USS Enterprise and USS Hornet launch 116 aircraft to attack the Japanese carrier fleet. At 07:53 the Japanese spot a force of 16 USMC Dauntless dive-bombers. Nine Japanese Zeros attacked the dive-bombers. The attack scored no hits. The Japanese shot down 8 dive-bombers for the loss of 1 Zero. At 08:10 15 B-17s attacked from high altitude. There were no hits on either side. At 08:20 Admiral Nagumo receives confirmation there is at least one American aircraft carrier in the area. Admiral Yamamoto also receives word of the American carrier sighting but chooses not to interfere. At 08:27 11 USMC Vindicator dive-bombers attack the battleship Haruna. They made no hits and the Japanese shot down two Vindicators. The submarine USS Nautilus fired a torpedo at the battleship Kirishima at 08:25. The torpedo missed. The Japanese sortied the destroyer Arashi to deal with the Nautilis.[iv]

At 09:17 the Japanese aircraft that bombed Midway return to their carriers and are ordered to rearm and attack the only confirmed carrier, the USS Yorktown. At 09:18 15 Devastator dive bombers attack the Japanese carriers. The Japanese shot down all of the Devastators. Ensign George H. Gay was the only Devastator aviator to survive the attack. At 09:40 14 Devastators attack. The Devastators scored no hits. The Japanese shot down 9 Devastators for the loss of one Zero. Another Devastator had to ditch. At 10:10 12 Devastators with 6 escorting Wildcats attacked. The leader of the Wildcats was Lieutenant Commander John Smith Thach. His Wildcats would use a tactic he devised for the first time in combat. It was a tactic named the “Thatch Weave”.[v] The Wildcats shot down 4 Zeroes for one loss. The Zeros and anti-aircraft shot down 10 of the Devastators. The Japanese lost a total of 7 Zeros. The Devastators scored no hits. At 10:26 48 U.S. Navy Dauntless dive bombers attack the Japanese carriers from two different directions. The attack mortally damages the Japanese carrier Kaga. At 10:25 U.S. Navy aircraft strike the Japanese carrier Soryu and set it on fire. At 10:26 U.S. Navy fighters strafe the carrier Akagi’s deck. The Akagi is also set on fire.

The Hiryu launches 18 dive bombers and 6 fighters to attack the USS Yorktown. U.S. Navy fighters engage the Japanese and shoot down 8 Japanese aircraft. At 12:00 the Japanese aircraft attack the USS Yorktown. The Japanese planes set the USS Yorktown on fire. At 13:20 the Hiryu launched a second wave of aircraft. American fighters attack these aircraft. Five Japanese dive bombers attack the Yorktown. The sailors on the USS Yorktown are given the order to abandon ship. At 15:40 another wave of 42 U.S. Navy Dauntless dive bombers are launched to attack the Hiryu. At 17:01 these aircraft attack and disable the Hiryu.[vi] The U.S. lost 2 Dauntless dive bombers the Hiryu sank the next day.

The Japanese attempted to turn the situation around. The Japanese sent four heavy cruisers and two destroyers to attempt a night surface engagement with the American Fleet. When the force was 80 miles (125 km) from Midway Admiral Yamamoto reversed his decision and ordered the cruiser force to retreat. On June 5 the Japanese heavy cruiser force spotted the U.S. submarine USS Tambor. While taking evasive action the Japanese heavy cruisers Mikuma and Mogami collided. At 03:00 on June 6 the USS Tambor, commanded by Lieutenant Commander John W. Murphy reported the Japanese ships. B-17s and PBYs from Midway searched for the ships. At 06:30 a PBY found the two damaged cruisers. VSMB-241, commanded by Captain Marshall Tyler, took off at 07:00. It was a force of 12 SBD Dauntless and SB2U Vindicator bombers. Anti-aircraft struck Captain Richard Fleming’s Vindicator. Captain Fleming crashed his aircraft into the Mikuma. The explosion and fire killed some of the Mikuma’s crew and greatly reduced its speed. At 08:30 B-17s made an attack but did no damage. Dive bombers from the USS Enterprise and USS Hornet carried out sporadic attacks on the damaged cruisers. The dive bombers hit the Mikuma at least 5 times. The Mikuma sank and 650 of the 890 sailors on board died. The dive bombers hit the Mogami and both escorting destroyers.[vii]

On June 6, the Japanese submarine I-168 struck the USS Yorktown and the destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412) with torpedoes. The torpedoes sank both ships. The Yorktown sank on June 7.

The Japanese lost 4 aircraft carriers, 1 heavy cruiser, 292 aircraft, and about 2,500 sailors. The U.S. lost 1 aircraft carrier, 1 destroyer, 145 aircraft, and 307 service members. [viii]


[i] History Channel, Battle of Midway Tactical Overview, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kipF5zoCGAk, last accessed 11/11/19.

[ii] Department of the Navy – Naval History and Heritage Command, Scouting and Early Attacks from Midway, 3-4 June 1942, https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/photos/events/wwii-pac/midway/mid-1m.htm, last accessed 11/12/19.

[iii] Department of the Navy – Naval History and Heritage Command, Japanese Air Attack on Midway, 4 June 1942, https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/photos/events/wwii-pac/midway/mid-2.htm, last accessed 11/12/19.

[iv] The Battle of Midway 1942: Told from the Japanese Perspective, https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=midway+the+japanese+side&view=detail&mid=D1F66013E519E3FC59C3D1F66013E519E3FC59C3&FORM=VIRE, last assessed 11/14/19.

[v] In the Thatch Weave fighter elements would fly abreast of each other. When an element is attacked the elements would turn towards each other.

[vi] History Channel, Battle of Midway Tactical Overview, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kipF5zoCGAk, last accessed 11/11/19.

[vii] Compounding Disaster: The Loss of the Mikuma at Midway, https://padresteve.com/2012/06/05/compounding-disaster-the-loss-of-the-mikuma-at-midway/, June 5, 2012, last accessed, 11/14/19.

[viii] History Channel, Battle of Midway Tactical Overview, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kipF5zoCGAk, last accessed 11/11/19.

Should Hollywood attempt to make films about other naval battles?

See results

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2019 Robert Sacchi

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      13 months ago

      The short answer to your question is "no". There have always been ne'er do wells. Some of them end up with armed forces at their disposal.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      13 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Too bad movies like this about the Battle of Midway cannot be fiction like sci-fi movies. There have been so many wars over the centuries. Will humanity ever learn to live peacefully?

      Somehow when I see what is happening in Minneapolis and elsewhere because of the needless killing of an unarmed and handcuffed black man, I doubt it. It is inexcusable what happened!

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      16 months ago

      Good point. Pearl Harbor gave Americans a lesson in the price of not preparing for war. Japan could have been an advanced and prosperous country if they chose a peaceful route in the 30s. Unfortunately for everyone they chose a different route.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      16 months ago from Houston, Texas

      The Battle of Midway is well known to history buffs. I have not seen this movie, but thanks for writing about it. Too bad people around the world cannot dwell on peace and improving the lots of their citizens instead of preparing for war, and in too many instances, waging warfare.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      19 months ago

      Thank you all for reading and commenting.

      Jonard Langanson - I was worried it might be like Pearl Harbor. I was pleasantly surprised it wasn't.

      Mary Norton - It opened in Canada on November 8. It has a big worldwide release. Noticeably absent is Japan.

      Lynne Samuel - I don't see a release date for Malaysia.

    • dailytop10 profile image

      dailytop10 

      19 months ago from Davao City

      At first glance it looks like another remake of Pearl Harbor.. Good move though, seen it already.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 

      19 months ago from Ontario, Canada

      I would like to watch this movie. I hope wars no longer happen in our world.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      19 months ago from UK

      I just checked. It seems to be on wide release. I hadn't noticed because I was out of the country at the time of its release.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      19 months ago

      Thank you all for reading and commenting:

      Luis G Asuncion - You may want to look around for it. According to IMDB it was released in The Philippines on November 6. It doesn't say how widely distributed.

      FlourishAnyway - It will be interesting to see if Hollywood is satisfied enough with the results to embark on similar projects.

      Liz Westwood - According to IMDB it was released in the UK on November 8. Wonder if it is a wide release?

      Pamela Oglesby - The numbers of casualties in World War II are hard to fathom. The UK & France lost more in WWI but overall the WWII deaths were in the 50 million range.

      Alan R. Lancaster - Passing on technology to an ally has its own risks. They might not be so careful with it or switch sides. Italy, which as not given radar either, and Finland both switched sides. Overall the Zero was superior to the American fighters in 1941. The Navy boasts the Thatch Weave tactic as a way of dealing with the Zeros. The tactic had a good debut at Midway. Americans like to boast about their aircraft being sturdier than the enemy aircraft, especially the Japanese. There is some truth to that. The U.S. found a crashed Zero in good shape and were able to use what was learned to develop the F6F Hellcat, which did very well against the Japanese fighters.

    • lynnes75 profile image

      Lynne Samuel 

      19 months ago from Malaysia

      Great review, and now I feel like watching it. WW movies are some of my favorites. Maybe I'll give this one a watch as well.

    • alancaster149 profile image

      Alan R Lancaster 

      19 months ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

      Comprehensive overview, Robert. The Media uses the old mantra "Never let the facts get in the way of a good story". I've seen an array of US battle scenarios on the Yesterday channel here in the UK. Considered to be factual, presented by teams of commentators and sometimes with retrospective views by participants (by now mostly deceased). Midway has been featured several times, and I've always wondered, that as allies the Germans never passed on their radar trechnology, or maybe they tried and the Japs' attitude was fatalistic. And it's just as well, as early on their planes knocked the spots off the US navy's slower machines (so the commentaries go - not being expert I wouldn't know. What's the US angle?)

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      19 months ago from Sunny Florida

      My husband is a WWII buff and might like to see this movie despite its f flaws. You wrote a good, detailed account of this film. I am always a bit appalled at the massive loss of life. I appreciate the interesting facts of the Pacific battles.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      19 months ago from UK

      I hadn't realised that there had been another version recently, but in my defence I was away and not near tv for 2 weeks in November! You give a good resume of both versions as well as interesting facts about the original battle.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      19 months ago from USA

      There’s definitely a market for this and it’s not just current and former service personnel. My husband loves anything WWI or WWII and we have seen a number of films in the theater and on Netflix. Just today we watched part of the series on Ivan the Terrible and his trial. He will definitely want to see this movie so thanks for the heads up. You are very thorough in your descriptions.

    • Luis G Asuncion profile image

      Luis G Asuncion 

      19 months ago from City of San Jose Del Monte, Bulacan, Philippines

      wow, great... hoping so, that I can watch that movie. However, that movie is not showing here in the Philippines.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)