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Superman vs. Thor, the god of thunder

Updated on February 18, 2012

The Ultimate Battle

Superman
Superman
Thor
Thor

Who Would Win?

I've taken a survey of the previous Superman vs. Thor opinions (mostly from YouTube), and the outcome is that Thor could best Superman in a one-on-one contest. The contest revolves around Thor being a magical being and the fact that Superman has two weaknesses, i.e., kryptonite and magic. Since Thor is an entirely a magical being, Superman would be at an immediate disadvantage. Whether any of Superman's powers would be effective against Thor is pure guess-work. Most probably his powers would be rendered useless. In a sense this would be like a contest against Superman against Dr. Fate. Superman is the supreme being on earth, but he is susceptible to the supernatural. Characters like Dr. Fate or Dr. Strange could simply put Superman in another dimension (like the Phantom Zone) from which he would be powerless to combat. The decisive point in a collision between Thor and Superman is the extent to which Thor's supernatural abilities would effect those of the man of steel. If Thor were any other mortal, Superman could slice him into two with his heat vision or create a vortex around him using super-speed, but Thor originates from another dimension and none of these tactic would be effective. Superman would be powerless against Thor's hammer, and that alone would be enough to render Superman stupefied. The good news is that Superman and Thor belong in different publications, and unless DC and Marvel decided to try a cross-over, both heroes have nothing to fear except their usual adversaries. Secondly, a contest between Thor and Superman is unlikely to take place since they both fight on the side of good against evil.

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      azure 5 years ago

      thor would break supes in half

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      mr D 5 years ago

      Superman is faster than the speed of light..that's how he reversed the earths rotation by flying around it..Thor wouldn't even know what hit him!..also, superman could push the earth into the sun..I saw the hulk beat Thors ass..superman beat the hulk easily three times..those are the facts...

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      randaljbatty@gmail.com 5 years ago

      Mr D: I would just remind you that Superman has at least two weaknesses. One, obviously is kryptonite. The other is magic. Thor is a magical being, so Superman would have No advantage.

      In the classic (Silver Age) of comics, Thor was more powerful than the Hulk. In more recent days, the writers have decided to reduce Thor's powers -- just as DC has reduced the strength of Superman.

      Nice try though.

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      spr mn 4 years ago

      the avangers movie kinda made thor look weak just by watching iron and thor's fight made me think that thor would be smashed to death by superman

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      Arcturius 4 years ago

      Both Superman and Thor are beings of absolutely staggering power. Each is the ultimate hero of his respective universe. But Superman is the original and greatest superhero icon, explaining why he "had to" win in his battle with Thor in JLA/Avengers. However, remember that Superman was exhausted at the end of that fight; it took everything he had just to slow Thor down; and Superman admits that Thor is without a doubt the single toughest opponent he's ever faced. I think, though, that in a completely objective matchup, Thor would most likely emerge the victor, for all the reasons stated above, for sheer brute strength, and for uncounted millennia of combat experience. Superman may be the icon of all superheroes, but Thor is the icon of all heroes.

    • rjbatty profile image
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      rjbatty 4 years ago from Irvine

      The situation with Thor has always been a bit awkward for Marvel. There are actual legends about Thor from ancient Nordic life. The Norsemen had a term for the "twilight of the gods," termed Ragnarök. That was when everything was destroyed in a cataclysmic battle, and even the gods would die. If you're a modern comic book writer, you have to kind of forget this preordained end for Thor. But, for those who have read "The Prose Edda," Thor and the rest of the gods would ultimately perish in a war to end all wars. Thus, if the belief or prophecy were true, nothing that happens to Thor on Earth is going to kill him. He might get battered, but the time of his death can only happen at the time of Ragnarök. Also, according to the "Prose Edda" poem, Thor would eventually marry Sif and have several sons (sorry Jane Foster).

      Superman is an alien, not a god. The yellow sun in our solar system gives him fantastic powers. (And I've always felt that the various Superman writers over the years have had to weaken him -- just to give a story some element of tension. But, if you discard kryptonite, magic, and red suns, he is virtually indestructible. Since Thor comes from a magical realm, Superman would immediately be at a disadvantage. Could Thor kill Superman? Perhaps, but it's difficult to imagine a scenario in which two protectors of Earth would take a fight to that level.

      It's just a good thing that these two ultimate personifications of power exist in different universes. It's a fun mental game to imagine the match up. Marvel/Disney holds the copywrite on Thor (the comic book character), but they cannot hold a copywrite on the folklore of a god once worshiped long, long ago. So, DC (theoretically) could come up with their own version of Thor and do with him whatever they might conceive. But, that wouldn't be quite the same, would it. Perhaps someday the two publishers would do a cross-universe series, and we might see a clash between these ultimate heroes. Somehow, I doubt that the writers would do the story justice.

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      Arcturius 4 years ago

      I agree that the battle in JLA/Avengers did not completely do them justice, but space was limited. It is interesting how Superman's "powering down" has run a trajectory roughly parallel with Thor's "ramping up" so that they are now (unintentionally) pretty evenly matched. I think we can all agree that Silver Age Superman's powers were just ridiculously beyond absurd, to the point that you could hardly even take the character seriously at all any more. John Byrne, I think, managed to salvage (or even resurrect) the integrity and "believability" of the character from totally pointless to relevant again.

      Side note -- does anyone else think that the lack of red briefs on Superman's costume in "MAN OF STEEL" just somehow doesn't look right? We make fun of the red underpants but when they're absent you sure do notice that something essential is missing -- at least for me.

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      Arcturius 4 years ago

      And another thing....the ultimate wild card always seems to come up in this conversation, that being none other than....the Hulk. Speculation has always run rampant over where the Hulk places in all this. In the DC vs. Marvel series of the mid-90's, where the readers got to vote and pick the "winners" of the various match-ups, Superman beat the Hulk (barely). However, I'll explain why this is wrong and why nobody -- and I mean NOBODY -- could EVER beat the Hulk.

      The longer a human being physically exerts him or herself, fatigue acids eventually saturate muscle fibers and cause that person to slow down, becoming tired and weaker, until spent. This is also true to a lesser extent with most metahumans and superheroes, to varying degrees: even Captain America and Wolverine, for instance, can "tire" over time. With the Hulk, though, the process works in the EXACT REVERSE -- the longer he remains the Hulk, the longer he rages, the longer he battles and bashes in fury, the greater the concentrations of gamma-irradiated amino acids saturating his body expotentially increase, meaning he only becomes STRONGER the more he exerts himself, with conceivably NO LIMIT. In short, the Hulk CAN"T get tired and CAN"T get weaker -- he can ONLY become more and more powerful. This explains the progression of his battle with the Abomination in the second Hulk film. The Abomination BEGAN the fight stronger than the Hulk and took him by surprise. But as the fight wore on, it became clear that the Hulk's strength was steadily and rapidly increasing, a unique feature not shared by the Abomination, until by the end of the contest the Hulk completely dominated Blonsky, very nearly killing him in the process (and you have to admit the victory stance the Hulk took in which he stomped and crushed Blonsky's sternum was priceless). Although Superman cannot really get "tired" in the literal sense due to his molecular structure being a constantly replenishing solar battery, he also cannot experience his strength expotentially increasing like the Hulk's either. It would be quite a contest, and likely a very long one, but in the end the Hulk would inevitably emerge the winner, for the reasons stated above, probably by just smashing and battering Superman into unconsciousness or worse. By the same token the Hulk would also eventually defeat Doomsday, again for the same reasons. That's the whole point of the Hulk -- he is literally "the strongest one there is", Superman's Kryptonian physiology and Thor's hammer notwithstanding.

    • rjbatty profile image
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      rjbatty 4 years ago from Irvine

      Arcturius: You have raised some really good points. I'll have to think about a Hulk vs. Superman match-up. I tend to lean toward Superman. If he could sustain a choke hold on the Hulk, he could take him into outer space. As far as I'm aware the Hulk needs oxygen just as any other living creature. Superman could leave him in a high orbit, send him to the moon, toss him toward the sun or a very vacant spot in the cosmos. Since Superman can move at near light-speed, he could accomplish this task within seconds.

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      Arcturius 4 years ago

      Well - argued, point taken -- but a choke-hold that would be retaliated against by a reverse or side-punch to Superman's head that would crack a mountain or an elbow to the ribs that could rupture a tectonic plate. I doubt the Hulk would cooperate with a choke-hold, even by Superman. So again -- Superman try, but Hulk smash.

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      rjbatty 4 years ago from Irvine

      Arcturius: I can see that you are a big Hulk affection-ado. In these theoretical games, we mustn't lose sight of how caprice-full we are being. But, it's fun. I see the Hulk as a mortal being -- super-strong but not invulnerable. I see Superman (over the years) as being invulnerable regardless of the amount of energy generated against him (kryptonite and magic being his only vulnerabilities). I also see the Hulk as a brute force, not clever or beguiling -- distinct disadvantages. You can not slug your way out of every battle. Where an artillery shell could cause a flesh wound in the Hulk, the same would have zero effect on the Man of Steel. Regardless of the Hulk's strength, he would not be able to inflict a scratch on Superman. Superman would not need to even touch the Hulk but merely create a vacuum around him by circling him at super-sonic speed. The vortex could be created to lift the Hulk into the nothingness of space. Once he arrived in the troposphere, his lungs would start to collapse, and his body start to freeze. The further out he was sent, he would probably simply explode. You can't smash something you cannot grab, and you can't fight against an extremely adverse environment.

      Some of the ambiguity about the Hulk's limitations is due to the writers who keep changing their minds about his capabilities. The same could be said about Superman.

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      Arcturius 4 years ago

      Then how do you explain that Doomsday "killed" Superman -- and with nothing but brute force? Given the Hulk's ability to only increase in strength, power, and energy, theoretically surpassing Doomsday and really anybody else, how could he not win? And as for invulnerability, it seems to me that it has been long established that the Hulk is at least as invulnerable as Superman. Again, Hulk smash. Hulk win. Infinity. Infinity times infinity. Forever and ever. Amen.

    • rjbatty profile image
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      rjbatty 4 years ago from Irvine

      Arcturius: I cannot explain how Doomsday killed Superman. I took the idea as a ploy by DC to simply sell more comics ... and get a lot of free publicity. I thought the whole story line was absurd and bogus. Over the years the publisher has fooled around with the strength limits of Superman. Sometimes he's strong enough to move planets from their orbits; while other times some villain is able to beat him pretty good. It's this inconsistency in comic (in general) that drives me nuts.

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      Arcturius 4 years ago

      You're right -- the whole Doomsday storyline also struck me as semi-lame and gimmicky. And I am guilty of digressing from the central theme of this thread, Superman vs. Thor. (Hammer + magic + fighting prowess = Superman defeated). And I also admit a soft spot in my heart for the Hulk. I just think that logically, Superman's other vast array of powers notwithstanding, in a contest of sheer brute force, strictly limited to brute force, the Hulk wins every time.

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      Flash 4 years ago

      thor wins most of the time. Magic on his side, with a hammer that's enchantered by odin, strength about equal to SM. Fighting skills. Always able block blast mostly laser type blast (silver surfer & gladiator) Thor Only lose interm of speed against an alian who's faster then speeding bullet.

      Just want to tell you all. superman moving a planet is just a PIS. Like how Hercules was ticked by Atlas. **If I'm not mistaken ATLAS was his name** Atlas told hercules that he need to catch his breath, so herculese accept the offer. but Atlas lied to herculese he just vanish after that. Hercules take his place lifting planet earth ever after. After that, Thor meet Hercules and agree to help him for a while. So Thor lift the earth while hercules is taking a rest.

      Another Thor lift a Midgard serpent that's bigger then the Midgard (earth). It's just the plot is written stupidly some time that's all.

      If we take a feats of somthing crazy as that, it means 1hit from thor's hammer turns "planet earth" to a "pancake earth."

      Same gose to superman more powerful then locomotive (easily class 100 matchable those tye likes of hulk,herculese,silver surfer,sentry & thor's lv. Of strength). faster then speeding bullet (surely slower then lightning).

      He's Able to move a planet. Wait a sec.! More powerful then locomotive can push a planet? Really? Can 2-3 locomotives move a planet? Not even a moon can move the earth.

      If Thor is more powerful then the earth, and he can make pancake earth. Same gose to superman if he had a power to move a planet, A single strong fick of his finger able to send Doomsday to outerspace.

      Nobody says that most of superman's comic book (his strength easily could lift 100 tones) is written stupidly, while saying a very rare occurrence like moving planet is his real strength.

      Just incase if anyone thinks moving a planet is SM real strength, well I'm sorry to dissapoint you, that Is just a PIS. It's just the plot is just written stupidly

      Peace.

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      Arcturius 4 years ago

      Again, it all goes back to my original points about Superman eventually accruing powers that were just flat-out, ridiculously silly. What is the point of wearing a costume and fighting crime if you can play marbles with entire solar systems? With that level of power just blinking your eyes would cause the earth's magnetic poles to shift. Idiotic. What is the need to be in a "Justice League" if you could just kill all its members just by winking at them? Stupid. This is what turned me off to Superman many years ago -- how could a character like that possibly sustain any level of interest? Where could you possibly go -- what could you possibly do -- with a character like that?? You might as well just have God as a superhero fighting bank robbers and mad scientists.

    • rjbatty profile image
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      rjbatty 5 months ago from Irvine

      Someone asked Stan Lee about the outcome of a fight between the Hulk and Superman. He responded wisely by saying it was all left up to the writer. I'm sure he'd say the same about a Thor vs. Superman match. The outcome would be up to the individual writer -- thus there is no true answer to this question. These are fictional characters whose powers wax and wane with time and with the discretion of the particular writer. I tend to give Thor a lot of credit because he was worshipped for centuries in Northern Europe. It took a long time for Christianity to blot out the "pagan" ideas of the Norsemen. So, in a sense, my blog and many others like it, are like asking who would win in a contest between Jesus and Superman. It's ridiculous, right? Marvel grabbed Thor from what we now term "mythology" and turned him into a comic book figure who then also became some other iteration in the film industry. Stan Lee probably figured, well, Hercules has been grist for the grind for a long time, so why not Thor? I don't see anything tremendously sacrilegious about that. So Marvel grabbed Thor and did whatever they wanted with him -- just as the film industry is showing us their own version of Thor. In the beginning, I believe Stan wanted Thor to be the mightiest hero in Marvel's lineup -- even over the Hulk. But, as he stated, as writers come and go, so do the powers and abilities of our favorite characters. If someone wanted, they could make the Wasp the most powerful being in the universe. The good/bad thing about comic books is that there is really no consistency. The Silver Age was the last period where there was any kind of prolonged or sustained consistency of powers endowed to the characters (for better or worse). Thereafter, everything was subject to the interpretation of the individual writer, and any kind of consistency flew out the window. I'd actually like to see DC/Marvel publish a directory about their characters and focusing in on their strengths/weaknesses. Then I'd like whoever writes the next comic to adhere to this index so that we can critique them against an established standard. But of course this will never happen because it is too limiting. You can sell more comics by having Superman die at the hands of someone like Doomsday, and so it means the demise of an American icon so be it if you can increase sales. Like so many things in life, it always comes down to $$, and the comic book industry is more concerned about the bottom line than the integrity of Superman, Thor, or the Hulk. You can always bring them back to life, so what's the fuss? For me, the fuss is that there is no solid line, no declaration that this is the limits of any given character's power. Without such a reference, anything goes (and does), and it all becomes nonsense. Enjoy a single comic/film or arc and just let it stand on its own. There is no carry-over to the next phase because the next writer might decide to make Thor a woman,, kill-off Captain America, have Spider-Man get married, etc., etc.

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