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Zombies

Updated on February 9, 2014

Zombies and the Zombie Apocalypse

The Zombies are coming! They're ugly, they're hungry, and they're very motivated to that one and only purpose of consuming human brains. Zombies have enjoyed a resurgence in popularity, and are favorites among horror movie fans, and even some who aren't into horror movies. Zombies have an amazing way of becoming popular even with individuals who are otherwise not horror movie fans. This craze is only getting hotter, and a good search for great zombie movies on Amazon.com gives an amazing array of options. If you're a fan, you'll like this page.

So this lens is ALL about zombies, so enjoy!

The Rules For a Zombie Movie

Because too many film producers are breaking the rules of how to make a zombie film

Zombie Movies are among the most widely popular sub-genre of horror movies out there, if not the most popular. One thing that big zombie fans will tell you is that there are rules for making zombie movies.

So screw you 28 Days Later, Resident Evil Apocalypse, and Return of the Living Dead (see rule #2). Good, bad, or otherwise (and that's exactly how I feel about those movies, one good, one bad, one eh), they break the basic rules of zombie movies.

ZOMBIE MOVIE RULES:

1) Zombies have to be dead before becoming zombies. Coming back from the dead is mandatory, none of this instantaneous infection stuff, or animals becoming zombies by eating zombie flesh. Dead, then living dead. That's a zombie.

2) Zombies can only be killed by damaging the brain, and they ALWAYS die by damaging the brain. None of this re-animated skeleton stuff.

3) Zombies are not very smart or coordinated (this one can be altered a little bit on the coordination level since there are running zombies, but they shouldn't be able to scale ten ladders, fit through a crawl space, and leap down on unsuspecting victims).

4) To be a zombie movie, the main focus has to be zombies vs. the living.

Because of the above rules, I'm disqualifying "Return of the Living Dead," (I don't care if it's a satire, a zombie with a pick through its brain should die, see #2) "Return of the Living Dead II" (see #2 again), "Evil Dead" (#4-demon possession doesn't count), and "28 Days Later" (see #2-there is a very active argument over whether they are even zombies or not).

With those movies and other similar ones disqualified, let's move on to the list of top zombie movies.

Zombie Survival Gudies: They're a Must!

Max Brooks wants you to survive, so why won't you listen??

The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead
The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead

The Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks was the first book to record all the incidents of zombie attacks, and a guide for the common citizens to protect themselves from the impending invasion.

 
World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War
World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War

The world almost died, most people forgot when the zombies became too many...remember so history doesn't repeat itself.

 

Dead Alive (1992), Best Zombie Movie Ever?

Maybe the best zombie movie ever - also known as "Brain-Dead" in the United States

Dead Alive (1992). Believe it or not, this movie was made by the same Peter Jackson who directed "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy.

This movie also bragged about being the bloodiest in the history of cinema. The final scene was said to take over 300 liters of fake blood - still a record.

This film is gory on such a level that no one has managed to match it. In fact, the gore factor is so high that this movie remains banned in some countries, and was originally banned in Germany and Korea, only being released in a heavily edited version.

The movie starts fast and then doesn't let up. While the special effects are amazing, what really makes this a winner is the large doses of humor and weirdness in this film are what will remain with you.

Some of the things you will learn about zombies in this film include:

1) Zombies can get it on...and zombie dads do have to worry about child support (because apparantly they can have zombie babies)

2) Priests are awesome at totally kicking zombie ass because apparantly in their shady past they were all kung fu masters

3) Lawnmowers make great weapons against zombies (also something you learned if you played the video game Dead Rising

4) Zombies like to party, too. They throw one hell of a keggar.

This film is darkly funny, if not outright hilarious, and there are tons of quotable lines that will stay with you long after watching the film, and the final scene had fake blood pumping at over 5 gallons a second.

This gore, with the incredibly dark humor, and expert direction from Peter Jackson makes this arguably the best pure zombie movie of all time.

Arguments will surely remain, but if you take away the "legacy" value of Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead, then "Dead Alive" clearly comes out as king of them all, and deserves its rightful place on top of the throne.

Buy Dead Alive - One of the Best Zombie Movies, Ever!

"Dead Alive" was directed by Peter Jackson - That's right, the same Peter Jackson who directed The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Dead Alive
Dead Alive

To this day, this zombie movie has the world record for most fake blood used in one scene

 

Night of the Living Dead - The Movie That Created Modern Zombies

George Romero's vision comes to full light in this zombie movie

Night of the Living Dead (1968) is the original black and white zombie film by George Romero.

This was a pivotal film that changed how zombie movies would be filmed forever afterwards. Though not very scary by today's standards, you can still admire the skill of directing and acting (minus the ever screaming Barbara) in this film.

This also started the tradition of horror films that made major social commentary, and this is one of the earliest movies to have an African-American as the main star. This movie is the first in the Romero trilogy (I refuse to accept "Land of the Dead"), and is the beginning of the entire zombie infestation.

Every modern version of a zombie owes itself to this black and white film, which also shows how a quality movie can be made on a limited budget. In fact, the choice to shoot in black and white was in part to save money, and also because he found that in black and white, Hershey's chocolate syrup looked just like blood.

That's right - all the blood in the original classic is actually Hershey's cholcolate syrup. That's how the gore of zombie movies was born.

Night of the Living Dead - Own a Copy of the Original Classic!

Night of the Living Dead (Millennium Edition)
Night of the Living Dead (Millennium Edition)

The new milennium edition of this timeless zombie classic.

 

Original Dawn of the Dead - George Romero's Finest Zombie Movies

The zombie movie that set the bar for all other zombie movies

Dawn of the Dead (1978).

This horror film was George Romero's finest zombie movie and one that completely re-defined both the horror and the zombie genre (again).

This film paved the way for the great zombie movies to follow. "Dawn of the Dead," is the second part of the trilogy and begins with the zombie infestation being fought, but mass hysteria and the continuing spread shows that it is a losing effort. No matter how much the police, military, and beer drinking hillbillies try, the zombies keep multiplying.

A few heroes get together with a helicopter pilot, and land on a mall for supplies, only to find it has all they ever need. All they have to do is barricade it.

So they block it off from the outside, exterminate the zombies inside, and settle into a normal life, though one dies while trying to block off the outside doors with semi trucks.

The one day a biker gang shows up. Then, as with any good zombie movie, all hell breaks loose. The gore in this film set a new level for what was "allowed" in films, and helped to create the term "splatter film."

This movie is very political, epitomizing the mindless consumerism of America that "makes zombies" of us all, and of the always present danger of living humans not able to cooperate in a world where this is mandatory for survival, a theme that Romero loves to hit home with in every one of his movies.

The Original Dawn of the Dead - How Can You Not Have It??? - Maybe the most important zombie movie ever made

Dawn of the Dead [Blu-ray]
Dawn of the Dead [Blu-ray]

You can now get the original "Dawn of the Dead" on Blu-ray disc. It proves that zombies just won't die...

 
Dawn of the Dead - The Original Director's Cut (Collector's Edition)
Dawn of the Dead - The Original Director's Cut (Collector's Edition)

Get the original Romero classic on DVD, or they'll come for your brains...

 

28 Days Later--Zombie Movie, or Not?

I thought this was a good movie either way you cut it, but the argument continues...

Is 28 Days Later Really a Zombie Movie?

Yes! This is a great zombie movie!

Yes! This is a great zombie movie!

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    • Wildcard2007 7 years ago

      I think the poll itself has a hole in it. Yes! This is a zombie movie but not among my favorites. or something like that should be added. Your poll is basically saying if I think its a zombie movie I have to automatically love it.

    • anonymous 8 years ago

      You are all forgetting one important idea of an idealistic zombie, the bite. Throughout the 28 series it was a bite and a biological pathogen, just like every other zombie movie, do your homework boys. Here is a tip, look at the eyes

    • anonymous 8 years ago

      technically speaking, I suppose it isn't. But it meets the requirements of gore, apocalyptic setting (which it does better than any other movie in the genre, in my opinion), and humans v. "zombies". It also includes the cliches of utilizing a small band of survivors, other humans eventually becoming a more worrisome enemy, one of their own becoming a "zombie". So technically I'd say it isn't, but looking at it holistically, I'd definitely classify it in the genre.

    • anonymous 9 years ago

      it is but it isnt. ARG! it is. in all but biological phenomina. Phycologically, if someone didnt tell me it was rage id say they were zombies...hence zombie movie.

    No! They're not dead, so they're not really zombies!

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      • dryb0nz 4 years ago

        Great movie, but not a zombie movie. Zombies mean something very specific--in essence they are a reflection of modern humanity. The monsters in 28 Days Later function differently. One essential difference is that the zombie has no super-human qualities--this is important to what a zombie is and how it functions as a modern monster. More at my lens:http://www.squidoo.com/the-meaning-of-zombies2

      • cinefile 5 years ago

        It's a good argument!

      • FreakyV 5 years ago from Canada

        Gonna say no, infection is a valid way of becoming a zombie but "rage" didn't kill its host, only made it furious.

      • Dynomoose LM 8 years ago

        They're not dead. They're not really zombies. And the fact that these, supposedly enraged, people only go after the uninfected is a fatal plot hole.

      • EshanMonteath 9 years ago

        You have to die to become a zombie. They are really nasty human beings, but not zombies. This is the best "zombie movie" that's really not a zombie movie.

      Dawn of the Dead - 2004 Remake

      Dawn of the Dead remake - also a classic zombie movie

      Dawn of the Dead (2004).

      I know that 99 out of 100 times it is blasphemy to even compare a re-make to being as good as the original, but this is a great movie with what you would call "motivated zombies."

      No agile side stepping and accurate close range shooting is going to help you here. In fact, unless you’re a track star, you mine as well call yourself lunch because you can’t outrun any of these zombies. This re-make is not a complete re-make, since the beginning and ending are different, the zombies are fast, strong, and true predators.

      This is a terrifying film that brings fear of zombies to an entirely new level where it hadn’t gone before—to the forefront of a modern horror fan’s mind. It’s one thing to have ten zombies shuffling awkwardly towards the house when you have a hand gun.

      It’s something else completely to have ten zombies running at you full speed that would have a Marine Sniper screwed. The gore in this film is extremely realistic, and the opening sequences of the zombie attack are fantastic.

      The acting is great, and this is what can happen when a zombie flick finally gets a big budget. This film may not be as sharp as the original, but it still has had the effect of transforming the modern zombie genre by taking it to terrifying new places—just like Romero’s original visions.

      Besides, for a can’t miss memorable moment: “Jay Leno.” If you’ve seen the movie, you know exactly what I’m talking about. If not, it's a nice light moment in a scary and depressing film.

      As an interesting side note, this film's dark ending is more similar to what Romero wanted to do in the original "Dawn of the Dead," which initially had an ending where Peter shoots himself and Fran pushes her face into the back rotor of the helicopter.

      Zack Snyder's Dawn of the Dead - A Worthy Zombie Remake

      Dawn of the Dead [HD DVD]
      Dawn of the Dead [HD DVD]

      The new "Dawn of the Dead" zombie movie on HD DVD.

       
      Dawn of the Dead (Widescreen Unrated Director's Cut)
      Dawn of the Dead (Widescreen Unrated Director's Cut)

      The new "Dawn of the Dead" remake on DVD.

       

      Movie Trailer to the Original Dawn of the Dead - Trailer to the original Dawn of the Dead zombie movie

      Shaun of the Dead - A New Classic Zombie Movie!

      Shaun of the Dead, a great zombie comedy

      Shaun of the Dead (2004). I can hear the screams and hate mail now, but quite frankly, this is a great zombie movie.

      This zombie movie makes fun of the genre while still paying heed to the blood and gore that makes up a zombie film. In addition, it makes reference or pays homage to virtually every major zombie movie before it, takes a hilarious swing at "28 Days Later" at the end, and addresses the fact that early on no one believes in zombies, so no one realizes what's going on.

      "Shaun of the Dead" is a great zombie movie that is enjoyed by both long time fans of the genre, and also by many movie fans who aren't usually horror movie fans.

      This is a top notch comedy, but it also takes the zombies seriously and there is a lot of blood and a lot of death. Despite this (or because of this) the humor works through out the movie.

      This is a very unique film that serves as a great bridge to get new fans to zombie movies. If you have a friend who wants to get into zombie movies, but has never seen one, no question this should be first on the list to bridge the gap.

      Shaun of the Dead - A Fantastic Comedy/Satire

      Shaun of the Dead
      Shaun of the Dead

      Shaun of the Dead on DVD

       
      Shaun of the Dead [HD DVD]
      Shaun of the Dead [HD DVD]

      Shaun of the Dead on HD DVD, a great zombie movie and satire

       

      Favorite Zombie Movie Ever?

      Judging zombie movies can be very difficult, but which one is your favorite?

      Which zombie movie is your favorite?

      See results

      Top 10 Zombie Movie List - Do you agree or disagree with his list?

      Unfortunately YouTube (or the creators) removed my favorite homemade zombie movies, there were some great ones, so enjoy this list

      "Zombie" or "Zombi 2," Either Way It's a Great Zombie Movie!

      Who would win: zombie or shark?

      Zombi 2 (1980). A great Italian zombie film, this Lucio Fulci film is known for the gory effects. The degree of gore in this film keeps it from being for those with weak stomachs, and has helped to catapult this movie to most zombie lovers’ top five list.

      The zombies that come out of these graves actually look like decomposing corpses that should be staying in their graves, as opposed to normal bloodied people.

      Much of the action takes place on an island, focusing on a doctor who wants to be "logical" and wants to refute all voodoo.

      But the walking dead aren't cooperating, and while he tries to find a cure, the walking dead continue to increase. In addition, this movie has the classic mixes of a beautiful woman, a doctor in completely over his head, and the gore that comes with zombie movies.

      Also there is a pretty famous scene with a zombie taking on an irritated shark.

      Zombi 2, A Great Italian Zombie Movie - Zombies versus sharks, what a match up!

      "Zombies Ate My Neighbors" YouTube video game review

      "Zombies Ate My Neighbors," video game for the SNES system is reveiwed by The Irate Gamer in this hilarious review.

      Cemetery Man - A One of a Kind Zombie Movie

      "Cemetery Man" (1994). This is an Italian movie that was released in the United States under the title "Cemetery Man." This is an extremely strange and romantically dark film.

      The caretaker of the cemetery finds himself in an intense sitation as he struggles every single Sunday because the dead keep waking up and prepare to attack the living. So he takes it upon himself every week to kill the zombies in order to prevent them from assaulting the town.

      This movie the caretaker is constantly trying to find love, and his first time falling in love is with the widow at a funeral. They decide to show their new found love for each other by "coming together" over the grave of her former husband.

      He has an issue with this, as he comes back as a zombie and kills her. Amazingly enough, this scene is not even the weirdest part of the movie.

      This film was very popular in Italy, but with only a small cult following in the United States. This movie is one of the most overlooked and underrated zombie films out there, but as a warning if you have kids who like horror movies: this film does have an awful lot of sex scenes, so be aware of everyone in the room before viewing.

      Cemetery Man - The Cult DVD Classic on Amazon

      One of the least known classic zombie films.

      Cemetery Man (1994)
      Cemetery Man (1994)

      Explicit and gory, this is a smartly written film that is incredibly unique and one of a kind.

       

      Links All About Zombies

      All the Zombie info you could want!

      Day of the Dead - Great Zombie Film by Romero, the Master

      The 3rd movie of the George Romero Trilogy

      Day of the Dead (1985). How could a zombie movie website exist without all three movies of the Romero Dead Trilogy (once again, keep in mind I refuse to acknowledge the existance of Land of the Dead because it was too over the top political and don't get me started on zombies and tools).

      "Day of the Dead" is the third of the original zombie trilogy by George A. Romero, all three movies of which make this list. The beginning wastes no time in revealing that zombies outnumber humans 400,000 to 1 (basically us breathers are screwed).

      This movie introduces the most famous single zombie, "Bub," who is being experimented on in an underground bunker. The head scientist ends up being off his rocker, and after a horrifying discovery of him feeding dead soldiers to his "pet zombie," the military takes over and all hell breaks loose.

      The end result is that the zombies overrun the compound and the few survivors having to flee for their lives. Filled with gore, guts, and a nearly heart attack causing opening scene (truly one of the best opening scenes in a horror movie ever), this film is well deserving of its place among the hearts of zombie fans.

      Day of the Dead DVD - the Classic Zombie Movie Is Available

      Day of the Dead [Blu-ray]
      Day of the Dead [Blu-ray]

      The newest release of "Day of the Dead," on Blu-ray for optimal horror.

       

      What Makes a Great Zombie Film?

      What makes a great zombie movie great?

      See results

      Great Zombie Stuff on eBay

      Zombie costumes? Zombie movies? Zombie survival guides? They're all for sale on eBay!

      "Re-Animator" Is A Low Budget Cult Classic Zombie Flick

      Shows what some creativity by independent film directors can do

      Re-Animator (1985). This movie is very loosely based on an H.P. Lovecraft story, and while most translations of a Lovecraft story have been terrible. This one may have been one of the best.

      "Re-Animator" is a very unconventional horror movie that opens with a strange and gory scene and keeps on punching all the way through. This is a great movie that succeeds with horror fans by still fulfilling all the conventions of a good horror flick, even while showing some hilarious scenes that are unconventional.

      Herbert West is a young med student who creates a serum that re-animates the dead when you inject it into their brains. He uses this to make zombies, and even after a few people are murdered, he’ll sometimes re-animate the heads, separate from the bodies.

      This type of bizarreness leads to an original story that is utterly strange, and full of the gratuitous violence, and yes, nudity, that many "classic" horror movies are known for.

      This is a one of a kind film that will always have its fans, and often times is often liked even more than the later movies in Romero's trilogy.

      The Re-Animator on DVD: See What the Fuss Is All About

      Re-Animator (The Millennium Edition)
      Re-Animator (The Millennium Edition)

      Re-Animator remains a classic decades later, and any want to be horror movie maker should watch this film to see what can be done.

       

      Sequels to "The Re-Animator"

      There were 2 seqels made to "The Re-Animator"

      Though not nearly as good as the first Re-Animator zombie movie, there are two sequels that weren't nearly as bad as one might suspect.

      Bride of the Re-Animator was made in 1990 and follows the main doctors who were experimenting with the undead in the original movie, and managed to survive. This is a pretty good movie, and is the direct sequel to the first movie.

      Beyond Re-Animator was made in 2003 and is a comedy/horror flick that continues along the same lines as the first two.

      Re-Animator Sequels

      Bride of Re-Animator
      Bride of Re-Animator

      The sequel to the highly popular original Re-Animator zombie movie.

       
      Beyond Re-animator
      Beyond Re-animator

      The final movie in the Re-Animator trilogy.

       

      Flint Zombie Walk Michael Jackson's Thriller - Hey, zombies dancing are still zombies!

      How can you have a zombie website without the famous dancing zombies from Michael Jackson's original video to "Thriller?" Nice work from the Flint Zombie Walk adding the sign language - I think that's really cool stuff.

      Survive the Zombie Onslaught

      The zombie apocalypse is going to happen, let no one kid you...

      We should all thank Max Brooks for the great service he is doing humanity. Not only is he collecting the stories of World War Z so we don't forget the time humanity almost perished, but he published the best selling Zombie Survival Guide.

      These are well written books, going over the gambit of important details from avoiding zombies in travel, to good and bad close quarter weapons, to the important details like why not to use a fire or wear a pony tail. A large section of recorded zombie attacks teaches you to be weary and ever vigilant.

      If you want to be prepared to survive the oncoming onslaught, these books are must reads!

      Max Brooks on Amazon

      Survive the zombies, read Max Brooks.

      The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead
      The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead

      Max Brooks wrote this survival guide for the good of us all. If you don't buy it, don't blame us when the zombies are munching on you...

       

      New Amazon Voting (Plexo)

      Cemetery Man (1994)
      Cemetery Man (1994)

      If you think you hate your job, think again. Francesco Dellamorte (Rupert Everett), the titular Cemetery Man, lives a lonely life with a dead-end career. He works and resides in a cemetery that holds a dark, hidden secret. You see, those who are buried in Dellamorte's cemetery have the tendency to rise from the dead. Francesco's job is to make sure the dead remain dead. When they rise, he must hunt them down and ensure they get their eternal rest. Since his strange career takes up most of his time, there is no room in his life for romance or friendship. His sole companion is his mute, Igor-like assistant Gnaghi (François Hadji-Lazaro). Not surprisingly, Francesco has grown weary of the dull drum and repetitive routine his job and life have become. It is not until he meets the girl of his dreams (Anna Falchi), who happens to be a widow attending her husband's funeral, that Francesco realizes that there may be more to life than this. Sound a bit odd? Well, it is. But fans of the zombie and the "twentysomething disgruntled worker" genres will feel right at home with this Michele Soavi cult favorite. At its center, Cemetery Man is a black comedy/existential mediation on loneliness and career disappointment. But where Fight Club is entrenched in an action/buddy-flick setting and Office Space is a strict black comedy, Cemetery Man is staged deep in the Italian zombie genre, giving it extra points for originality. --Rob Bracco

       
      Shaun of the Dead
      Shaun of the Dead

      British horror/comedy Shaun of the Dead is a scream in all senses of the word. Brain-hungry zombies shamble through the streets of London, but all unambitious electronics salesman Shaun (Simon Pegg) cares about is his girlfriend Liz (Kate Ashfield), who just dumped him. With the help of his slacker roommate Ed (Nick Frost), Shaun fights his way across town to rescue Liz, but the petty concerns of life keep getting in the way: When they're trying to use vinyl records to decapitate a pair of zombies, Shaun and Ed bicker about which bands deserve preservation--New Order they keep, but Sade becomes a lethal frisbee. Many zombie movies are comedies by accident, but Shaun of the Dead is deliberately and brilliantly funny, while still delivering a few delicious jolts of fear. Also featuring the stealthy comic presence of Bill Nighy (Love Actually) and some familar faces from The Office. --Bret Fetzer

       
      I Am Legend (Widescreen Two-Disc Special Edition)
      I Am Legend (Widescreen Two-Disc Special Edition)

      Will Smith stars in the third adaptation of Richard Matheson's classic science-fiction novel about a lone human survivor in a post-apocalyptic world dominated by vampires. This new version somewhat alters Matheson's central hook, i.e., the startling idea that an ordinary man, Robert Neville, spends his days roaming a desolated city and his nights in a house sealed off from longtime neighbors who have become bloodsucking fiends. In the new film, Smith's Neville is a military scientist charged with finding a cure for a virus that turns people into crazed, hairless, flesh-eating zombies. Failing to complete his work in time--and after enduring a personal tragedy--Neville finds himself alone in Manhattan, his natural immunity to the virus keeping him alive. With an expressive German shepherd his only companion, Neville is a hunter-gatherer in sunlight, hiding from the mutants at night in his Washington Square town house and methodically conducting experiments in his ceaseless quest to conquer the disease. The film's first half almost suggests that I Am Legend could be one of the finest movies of 2007. Director Francis Lawrence's extraordinary, computer-generated images of a decaying New York City reveal weeds growing through the cracks of familiar streets that are also overrun by deer and prowled by lions. It's impossible not to be fascinated by such a realistically altered cityscape, reverting to a natural environment, through which Smith moves with a weirdly enviable freedom, offset by his wariness over whatever is lurking in the dark of bank vaults and parking garages. Lawrence and screenwriters Mark Protosevich and Akiva Goldsman wisely build suspense by withholding images of the monsters until a peak scene of horror well into the story. It must be said, however, that the computer-enhanced creatures don't look half as interesting as they might have had the filmmakers adhered more to Matheson's vampire-nightmare vision. I Am Legend is ultimately noteworthy for Smith's remarkable performance as a man so lonely he talks to mannequins in the shops he frequents. The film's latter half goes too far in portraying Smith's Neville as a pitiable man with a messianic mission, but this lapse into bathos does nothing to take away from the visual and dramatic accomplishments of its first hour. --Tom Keogh

       
      Dawn of the Dead [Blu-ray]
      Dawn of the Dead [Blu-ray]

      Anchorbay Dawn Of The Dead (Blu-ray) In 1968, director George A. Romero brought us "Night Of The Living Dead." It became the definitive horror film of its time. Eleven years later, he would unleash the mostshocking motion picture experience for all times.As modern society is consumed by zombie carnage, four desperate survivors barricade themselves inside a shopping mall to battle the flesh-eating hordes of the undead. This is the ferocious horror classic, featuring landmark gore effects by Tom Savini, that remains one of the most important and mostcontroversial horror films in history.

       
      Dawn of the Dead [HD DVD]
      Dawn of the Dead [HD DVD]

      Are you ready to get down with the sickness? Movie logic dictates that you shouldn't remake a classic, but Zack Snyder's Dawn of the Dead defies that logic and comes up a winner. You could argue that George A. Romero's 1978 original was sacred ground for horror buffs, but it was a low-budget classic, and Snyder's action-packed upgrade benefits from the same manic pacing that energized Romero's continuing zombie saga. Romero's indictment of mega-mall commercialism is lost (it's arguably outmoded anyway), so Snyder and screenwriter James Gunn compensate with the same setting--in this case, a Milwaukee shopping mall under siege by cannibalistic zombies in the wake of a devastating viral outbreak--a well-chosen cast (led by Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames, Jake Weber, and Mekhi Phifer), some outrageously morbid humor, and a no-frills plot that keeps tension high and blood splattering by the bucketful. Horror buffs will catch plenty of tributes to Romero's film (including cameos by three of its cast members, including gore-makeup wizard Tom Savini), and shocking images are abundant enough to qualify this Dawn as an excellent zombie-flick double-feature with 28 Days Later, its de facto British counterpart. --Jeff Shannon

       
      Night of the Living Dead (Millennium Edition)
      Night of the Living Dead (Millennium Edition)

      We can hardly imagine how shocking this film was when it first broke into the film scene in 1968. There's never been anything quite like it again, though there have been numerous pale imitations. Part of the terror lies in the fact that it is shot in such a raw and unadorned fashion that it feels like a home movie, and is all the more authentic because of that. It draws us into its world gradually, content to establish a merely spooky atmosphere before leading us through a horrifically logical progression that we hardly could have anticipated. The story is simple: Radiation from a fallen satellite has caused the dead to walk, and hunger for human flesh. Once bitten, you become one of them. And the only way to kill one is by a shot or blow to the head. We follow a group holed up in a small farmhouse who are trying to fend off the inevitable onslaught of the dead. The tension between the members of this unstable, makeshift community drives the film. Night of the Living Dead establishes savagery as a necessary condition of life. Marked by fatality and a grim humor, the film gnaws through to the bone, then proceeds on to the marrow. --Jim Gay

       
      Dead Alive
      Dead Alive

      If you're not a connoisseur of graphic horror and gruesome gore, you'd better steer clear of this wicked 1992 horror-comedy from the demented mind and delirious camera of New Zealand-born writer-director Peter Jackson. However, if nonstop mayhem and extreme violence are your idea of great entertainment, you're sure to appreciate Jackson's gleefully inventive approach to a story that can judiciously be described as sick, twisted, and totally outrageous. The movie's central character is a poor schmuck named Lionel who's practically enslaved to his domineering mother. But when ol' Mum gets bitten by a rare and poisonous rat monkey from Skull Island and is turned into a flesh-eating zombie, Lionel has the unfortunate task of keeping Mama happy while fending off all the other zombies that result from her voracious feeding frenzies. If you've read this far, you'll either be crying out for censorship or eagerly awaiting your first viewing (or second, or third...) of this wildly clever and audaciously uninhibited movie. And while director Jackson would later achieve critical success with his fact-based drama Heavenly Creatures, his talent is readily evident in this earlier effort. If you find this kind of thing even remotely appealing, consider Dead Alive a must-see movie. --Jeff Shannon

       
      28 Days Later (Widescreen Special Edition)
      28 Days Later (Widescreen Special Edition)

      The director/producer team that created Trainspotting turn their dynamic cinematic imaginations to the classic science fiction scenario of the last people on Earth. Jim (Cillian Murphy) wakes up from a coma to find London deserted--until he runs into a mob of crazed plague victims. He gradually finds other still-human survivors (including Naomie Harris), with whom he heads off across the abandoned countryside to find the source of a radio broadcast that promises salvation. 28 Days Later is basically an updated version of The Omega Man and other post-apocalyptic visions; but while the movie may lack originality, it makes up for it in vivid details and creepy paranoid atmosphere. 28 Days Later's portrait of how people behave in extreme circumstances--written by novelist Alex Garland (The Beach)--will haunt you afterward. Also featuring Brendan Gleeson (The General, Gangs of New York) and Christopher Eccleston (Shallow Grave, The Others). --Bret Fetzer

       
      Re-Animator
      Re-Animator

      Stuart Gordon's adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft's Herbert West: Re-Animator puts a Night of the Living Dead spin on the classic Frankenstein story. Jeffrey Combs furrows his brow and bugs his eyes as the preternaturally intense Herbert West, a maverick medical student whose gory, gooey experiments cause bloody corpses and body parts to jerk to life. Bruce Abbot is the studious roommate drawn into his extracurricular experiments, which soon involve the dean's daughter (the frequently naked Barbara Crampton) and the college's cadaverous, calculating star professor (David Gale), who literally loses his head over a battle for West's discovery. In this world, that's only a minor setback. Charged with sick gallows humor and a ghoulish gallery of undead beasties, Re-Animator, like Evil Dead II, is one of the most inspired and inventive--and funniest--horror films of the 1980s. Combs, Abbot, and Gale reunite for the almost-as-entertaining sequel Bride of Re-Animator. --Sean Axmaker

       
      Beyond Re-animator
      Beyond Re-animator

      After causing the Miskatonic University Massacre, Dr. Herbert West has been serving a prison sentence for the past 14 years. Far from overcoming his scientific obsession with bringing dead organisms back to life, he has had no choice but to continue his experiments on the only specimens he can find in his cell: rats. When Howard, a new young doctor, comes to work as the prison MD and requests his assistance, Dr. West discovers the young prot g has something he left behind 14 years ago...Features:Director CommentaryMaking-Of FeaturetteMusic VideoTrailersSystem Requirements: Running Time 95 Min Format: DVD MOVIE

       
      Bride of Re-Animator
      Bride of Re-Animator

      The mad Dr. Herbert West (Jeffrey Combs), the tormented Dr. Dan Cain (Bruce Abbott), and the beheaded Dr. Carl Hill (David Gale) return in this terrifying sequel to Re-Animator, the most deliriously outrageous horror movie of the decade. It's been eight months since the Miskatonic Massacre stained the halls with blood-and Dr. West and Dr. Cain's experiments have taken a bizarre turn. Now they have gone beyond re-animating the dead...into the realm of creating new life. The legs of a hooker and the womb of a virgin are joined to the heart of Dr. Cain's dead girlfriend-and the bride is unleashed upon her mate in a climax of sensual horror. Features: Full Screen Version 2.0 Dolby Stereo Surround Scene AccessInteractive MenusSystem Requirements:Run Time: 99 MinFormat: DVD MOVIE

       
      Night of the Living Dead
      Night of the Living Dead

      We can hardly imagine how shocking this film was when it first broke into the film scene in 1968. There's never been anything quite like it again, though there have been numerous pale imitations. Part of the terror lies in the fact that it is shot in such a raw and unadorned fashion that it feels like a home movie, and is all the more authentic because of that. It draws us into its world gradually, content to establish a merely spooky atmosphere before leading us through a horrifically logical progression that we hardly could have anticipated. The story is simple: Radiation from a fallen satellite has caused the dead to walk, and hunger for human flesh. Once bitten, you become one of them. And the only way to kill one is by a shot or blow to the head. We follow a group holed up in a small farmhouse who are trying to fend off the inevitable onslaught of the dead. The tension between the members of this unstable, makeshift community drives the film. Night of the Living Dead establishes savagery as a necessary condition of life. Marked by fatality and a grim humor, the film gnaws through to the bone, then proceeds on to the marrow. --Jim Gay

       
      Zombi 2 (25th Anniversary Special Edition 2-Disc Set)
      Zombi 2 (25th Anniversary Special Edition 2-Disc Set)

      In Lucio Fulci's genre classic Zombi 2, the dead rise once again to terrorize and consume the flesh of the living, this time Caribbean style! Those new to Fulci should note Island of the Flesh-Eaters, Zombi 2, and the more commonly known Zombie all refer to the same film. Though there is no Zombi 1, Fulci's film was titled Zombi 2 to capitalize on the commercial success of Romero's Dawn of the Dead. Though marketed as a sequel in Italy, the only similarities to Romero's classic are the title and the fact that the dead rise to eat the flesh of the living. Instead of being a metaphor for consumerism, Zombi 2 is a straight-out adventure story that ends in a horrific, apocalyptic nightmare. The plot is fairly straightforward, and more or less exists simply as a structure to hang scenes of extreme gore and terror on. Dr. Bowles's boat floats into New York Harbor missing its crew and carrying an undead passenger. The doctor's daughter (Tisa Farrow), dead set on finding out what happened to her father, teams up with journalist Peter West (Ian McCulloch) and heads to the cursed island of Matool, where a zombie epidemic is growing and Dr. Bowles's friend, Dr. Menard (Richard Johnson), is desperately trying to find a cure. Will Anne find her father? Will Dr. Menard find a cure? Will our heroes escape? In all honesty, who really cares? Because those in the "know" already know you don't come to a Fulci film looking for Shakespeare. What Zombi 2 lacks in plot development and continuity, it more than makes up for in atmosphere, intensity, and of course the trademark Fulci gore. Some of the unique high points are the never-duplicated zombie-versus-shark vignette, the rising of the Spanish zombie conquistadores, and Fulci's trademark eye shot. Fans of Italian/apocalyptic/cannibal/zombie films should not miss Zombi 2. Along with The Beyond, it defines the genre. --Rob Bracco

       
      Day of the Dead [Blu-ray]
      Day of the Dead [Blu-ray]

      Chapter three of George Romero's mighty zombie trilogy has big footsteps to follow. Night of the Living Dead was a classic that revitalized a certain corner of the cinema, and Dawn of the Dead was nothing short of epic. Day of the Dead, however, has always been regarded as a comedown compared to those twin peaks--and perhaps it is. But on its own terms, this is an awfully effective horror movie, made with Romero's customary social satire and cinematic vigor--when a "retrained" zombie responds to the "Ode to Joy," the film is in genuinely haunting territory. The story is set inside a sunken military complex, where Army and medical staff, supposedly working on a solution to the zombie problem, are going crazy (strongly foreshadowing the final act of 28 Days Later). Tom Savini's makeup effects could make even hardcore gore fans tear off their own heads in amazement. --Robert Horton

       
      Resident Evil: The High-Definition Trilogy (Resident Evil / Resident Evil: Apocalypse / Resident Evil: Extinction) [Blu-ray]
      Resident Evil: The High-Definition Trilogy (Resident Evil / Resident Evil: Apocalypse / Resident Evil: Extinction) [Blu-ray]

      Sony Pictures Resident Evil 1-3 (Blu-ray) Collection includes: "Resident Evil" - Something rotten is brewing beneath the industrial mecca known as Raccoon City.Unknown to its millions of residents, a huge underground bioengineering facility known as The Hive has accidentally unleashed the deadly and mutatingT-virus, killing all of its employees. To containthe leak, the governing supercomputer, Red Queen,has sealed all entrances and exits. Now a team ofhighly-trained super commandos including Rain (Michelle Rodriguez - "The Fast And The Furious," "Girlfight"), Alice (Milla Jovovich - "The Fifth Element") and Matt (Eric Mabius - "Cruel Intentions") must race to penetrate The Hive in order to isolate the T-virus before it overwhelms humanity. To doso, they must get past the Red Queen's deadly defenses, face the flesh-eating undead employees, fight killer mutant dogs and battle The Licker, a genetically mutated savage beast whose strength increases with each of its slain victims. "Resident Evil: Apocalypse" - After narrowly escaping the horrors of the underground Hive facility, Alice (Milla Jovovich) is quickly thrust back into a war ragingabove ground between the living and the Undead. As the city is locked down under quarantine, Alice joins a small band of elite soldiers, led by Valentine (Sienna Guillory, "Love, Actually") and Carlos (Oded Fehr, "The Mummy Returns"), enlisted to rescue the missing daughter of Dr. Ashford, the creator of the mutating T-virus. It's a heart-poundingrace against time as the group faces off against hordes of blood - thirsty zombies, stealthy Lickers, mutant canines and the most sinister foe yet. "Resident Evil: Extinction" - Milla Jovovich is back to kill more zombies in the third chapter of thehit "Resident Evil" franchise! An action/horror film filled with huge special effects and edge-of-your-teat terror! Survivors of the Raccoon City catastrophe travel across the Nevada desert, hoping to make it to Al

       
      Resident Evil / Resident Evil: Apocalypse
      Resident Evil / Resident Evil: Apocalypse

      Resident Evil: Something rotten is brewing beneath the industrial mecca known as Raccoon City. Unknown to its millions of residents, a huge underground bioengineering facility known as The Hive has accidentally unleashed the deadly and mutating T-virus, killing all of its employees. To contain the leak, the governing supercomputer, Red Queen, has sealed all entrances and exits. Now a team of highly-trained super commandos including Rain (Michelle Rodriguez - The Fast and the Furious, Girlfight), Alice (Milla Jovovich - The Fifth Element) and Matt (Eric Mabius - Cruel Intentions) must race to penetrate The Hive in order to isolate the T-virus before it overwhelms humanity. To do so, they must get past the Red Queen's deadly defenses, face the flesh-eating undead employees, fight killer mutant dogs and battle The Licker, a genetically mutated savage beast whose strength increases with each of its slain victims. Resident Evil Apocalypse : After narrowly escaping the horrors of the underground Hive facility, Alice (Milla Jovovich) is quickly thrust back into a war raging above ground between the living and the Undead. As the city is locked down under quarantine, Alice joins a small band of elite soldiers, led by Valentine (Sienna Guillory, Love, Actually) and Carlos (Oded Fehr, The Mummy Returns), enlisted to rescue the missing daughter of Dr. Ashford, the creator of the mutating T-virus. It's a heart-pounding race against time as the group faces off against hordes of blood- thirsty zombies, stealthy Lickers, mutant canines and the most sinister foe yet. Written and produced by the visionary director of Resident Evil, Paul W. S. Anderson (Alien Vs. Predator) and directed by Alexander Witt, Resident Evil Apocalypse is a superior sci-fi suspense sequel.

       
      Resident Evil: Extinction (Widescreen Special Edition)
      Resident Evil: Extinction (Widescreen Special Edition)

      The third installment in the massively popular film series based on Capcom's zombie horror/science fiction games, Resident Evil: Extinction brings the world to an end, not with a whimper but a bang, as Milla Jovovich's Alice pits her bio-organic superskills against armies of the undead in a post-apocalyptic Las Vegas. Also on hand is a more grown-up version of the games' Claire Redfield (played by Heroes' Ali Larter), who leads a convoy of humans (among them Resident Evil vets Oded Fehr and Mike Epps, who reprise their roles as Carlos and LJ, as well as newcomers Ashanti and Spencer Locke) in search of sanctuary; meanwhile, sinister Umbrella Corporation scientist Dr. Sam Isaacs (Iain Glen) seeks a cure for the zombie virus outbreak via Alice's blood, which he taps via a lab full of clones. Subtlety has never been the Resident Evil series' strong suit, but it's hard to argue against Extinction's breakneck pace and impressive CG special effects; director Russell Mulcahy (the Highlander series) lends a lot of verve to the proceedings, and the script by producer Paul W.S. Anderson pulls in agreeable touches from The Road Warrior and Day of the Dead. A hit during the summer of 2007, Extinction should please series devotees and action-horror fans alike; the DVD includes commentary by Mulcahy, Anderson, and co-producer Jeremy Bolt, as well as several making-of featurettes, and a glimpse at the next entry in the Resident Evil franchise, the CG-only Degeneration. -- Paul Gaita

       
      Kung Fu Zombie
      Kung Fu Zombie

      You're not interested in a kung fu zombie? Really? Not at all?

       
      Land of the Dead (Unrated Director's Cut) (Combo HD DVD and Standard DVD)
      Land of the Dead (Unrated Director's Cut) (Combo HD DVD and Standard DVD)

      Bolstered by the success of 28 Days Later, Shaun of the Dead, the Resident Evil movies and the hit remake of his own Dawn of the Dead, George A. Romero returns to the horror subgenre he invented with Land of the Dead. The fourth installment in Romero's zombie cycle (and the first since 1985's Day of the Dead) presents a logical progression of events since 1968's horror classic Night of the Living Dead: Zombies (also known as "stenches" for their rotting odor) are the dominant population, and they've begun to show signs of undead intelligence and gathering power. The wealthiest survivors live comfortably in a luxury high-rise within a barricaded safe zone, ignoring the horrors of the outside world while armed scavengers stage raids in the zombie-zone to gather much-needed food and supplies. Simon Baker and John Leguizamo play mercenaries-for-hire; Dennis Hopper is their nefarious boss; and horror favorite Asia Argento (daughter of Suspiria

       
      The Last Man on Earth
      The Last Man on Earth

      Vincent Price gives an atypically restrained performance as the sole survivor of a worldwide plague that revives its victims as bloodthirsty vampires. During the day, he canvasses his abandoned hometown, tracking down and stalking his former friends and neighbors, always making sure to return before nightfall, when the dead rise to assault his fortified house. Hope arrives in the form of an apparently normal young woman (Franca Bettoia), but her agenda proves to be even more sinister than that of the vampires. Based on the 1954 novel by coscripter Matheson (whose displeasure with the final product spurred the use of a pseudonym), this Italian-made production is best known for its influence on George Romero's Night of the Living Dead. The similarities between the two films go beyond the presence of shuffling zombies and housebound heroes; both feature taboo-breaking scenes of interfamilial murder, and both end on bleak, dystopian notes. While The Last Man on Earth lacks the political and darkly satirical shadings (and graphic gore) that make Night of the Living Dead a more memorable experience, the combination of Bava-esque Gothic atmosphere and bleak, documentary-style camerawork by directors Ragona and Salkow (the brother of Price's agent Lester Salkow) lend themselves to moments of pure frisson that compare laudably to Romero's film. Matheson's novel also provided the source material for the awkward 1971 Charlton Heston vehicle The Omega Man. A planned third version, helmed by Ridley Scott and starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, was shut down in its earliest stages due to skyrocketing budget costs. --Paul Gaita

       

      Did I get everything? What am I missing? What else do you want to see?

      Zombie Fans Sound Off!

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        • profile image

          anonymous 4 years ago

          Cool lens, I like Shaun of the Dead

        • LabKittyDesign profile image

          LabKittyDesign 4 years ago

          Because of the above rules, I'm disqualifying "Return of the Living Dead"...

          But, but.. LINNEA QUIGLEY!!11!!

          PS: Rule 0: No fast zombies. Ever. It's what makes zombies zombies. Someone needs to sit Zack Snyder down and explain mitochondria to him.

        • cinefile profile image

          cinefile 5 years ago

          Love me some zombies

        • FreakyV profile image

          FreakyV 5 years ago from Canada

          What an amazing collection of zombie information, going to link it to my zombie lens. Hope you don't mind. Love it.

        • Michelle77 LM profile image

          Michelle77 LM 6 years ago

          Awesome! I love Shawn of the Dead!! great lens :)

        • booluck profile image

          booluck 6 years ago

          i like to watch adaptation movies from the novels..

          wait and still wait more movies from novel editor..

          tq for your info..

          got more review about this legend movies..

          I thought my updated and interesting Squidoo lens was worth sharing with you guys

          |Medical Movies The Andromeda Strain

        • Dynomoose LM profile image

          Dynomoose LM 8 years ago

          Awesome Zombie lens. I just started working on mine and thought it was good until I saw this one! http://www.squidoo.com/zombiefic

          I'll be lensrolling you when my Zombie lens is no longer work in progress.

        • LethalDos profile image

          LethalDos 8 years ago

          Excellent run down! Lensrolled. You might like to check out my Zombie Movie write up!

          http://www.squidoo.com/zombie_movies

        • BetsiGoutal1 profile image

          BetsiGoutal1 8 years ago

          Nice! Lensrolling it. :)

        • profile image

          anonymous 8 years ago

          Well you forgot Xombie, which is a great Flash cartoon and the tons of ombie novels out there that arn't max brooks if you want some good ones try the rising while not a TRUE zombie book according to your rules its a great book none the less,