ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Helping Young Adults Prepare to Leave Home

Updated on June 4, 2018
denise.w.anderson profile image

Denise speaks from her own experience. She has had many trials and difficulties in her own life and seeks to help others through theirs.

It is a long way down from the cliff to the water, and we had better be ready, because there is no turning back!
It is a long way down from the cliff to the water, and we had better be ready, because there is no turning back! | Source

Ready, Set, Go!

The ages of 17-20 are the launching years. The teen is ready to move on. High School is no longer the end goal. It is either already under the belt or soon will be. The past few years have been filled with learning and discovery, and there is a plan in place for the future. Whether college, work, the military, or marriage, ongoing structure is necessary to provide guidance and direction. Specific career plans are not necessary at this point, but during the next few years, they will materialize.

Youth in this age group continue to need family support. They haven't gotten their feet under them financially, and have continued needs for health insurance, transportation, advice, counsel, and love. Even when they leave home, they need frequent contact to give them encouragement and hope for their own future. They will run into things that may be difficult and with their limited experience, they will feel frustrated.

Some youth rejoice so much in their freedom that their first year away from home, they contact very little while others call or text every day. The changing relationship between them and their parents may leave both a little unsettled, but more often than not, they will re-establish connects as they find their own identity and purpose.

Parents would do well at this stage to have patience and let go of the apron strings. Young adults need to make their own way in the world. They need to grow in their understanding of how things work. Helping them establish their own connections with financial institutions, communications providers, and insurance agencies is wise and will help them in the future.

Leaving home is like jumping off a cliff into a pool of water that we have never been swimming in before.
Leaving home is like jumping off a cliff into a pool of water that we have never been swimming in before. | Source

Plans to Make

  • Enter the job market. Temporary summer jobs are a starting place. Getting to know people who have their own businesses brings possibilities.Keep records of past jobs, supervisors, hourly wages, addresses, and phone numbers. Obtain letters of recommendation from mentors and teachers.
  • Compile a working file. Vital information including birth certificate, social security number, passport, driver's license, medical records, and insurance information will be needed when away from home. Keep a file of high school transcripts, and a current resume.
  • Access financial resources.Tap into grant and scholarship funds for continued schooling with the assistance of parents and the school counselor.
  • Learn life skills of caring for oneself, the house, clothing, and food before leaving the comfort of home. A recipe file is wise, a list of addresses for close friends and family, and needed passwords and phone numbers. Be prepared for bouts of home sickness and the occasional illness. A first aid kit for both physical and emotional needs is a great help.

Once we reach the water, the temperature may not be what we expect. We may go down further than we anticipated, and we have to get back on the top before we can breathe again.
Once we reach the water, the temperature may not be what we expect. We may go down further than we anticipated, and we have to get back on the top before we can breathe again. | Source

Tests to Pass

  • Relationships - friendships are tested when distance is placed between them. Some friends will remain faithful and last a life-time. Others may not and that is okay. Those that last will become cherished memories and perhaps future family or business partners. Time will tell. Communication keeps these friendships alive, however; goals, experiences, and people change. Some may need to be let go as they do not prove to be a positive influence. Having the courage to let go when it is time is a sign of maturity.
  • Sharing talents - talents may turn into employment opportunities or make wonderful hobbies that enrich future life. Being comfortable sharing is the key. Life is much too short to hide one's abilities. Those not used will eventually be lost in the shuffle. Outlets may be available at college or in the local community. Remember, success comes from hard work, persistence, and wise choices, and brings peace of mind in the long run.
  • Spirituality - feelings of self worth come from remembering who you are, both your family, and your spiritual heritage. Accomplishments and success may fade into the distance, but you will always be of worth if you have kept your family and spiritual ties strong. There is no substitute for the good feelings that come from making positive choices and giving service to others. Make it a regular part of life's journey.

Thankfully, once we get our bearings, we find that there are others in the same pool with us, and we can pull ourselves back together again.
Thankfully, once we get our bearings, we find that there are others in the same pool with us, and we can pull ourselves back together again. | Source

Enjoy the Journey

In spite of all the planning and preparation, there are times when its best just to enjoy the journey. The young adult is always the parent's child, but as they reach adulthood, there are moments where they seem more like a sibling, or a good friend. Their insight into the family, their own abilities and learning, and the prospects for the future are theirs alone. They come from a different perspective than that of the parent. There may be times of disagreement, and even down right anger and frustration. That is okay. They are adults now. They need to live their own life. Yes, they will come back home. They always do.

© 2011 Denise W Anderson

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • denise.w.anderson profile imageAUTHOR

      Denise W Anderson 

      7 years ago from Bismarck, North Dakota

      Thanks for your comments. What I did with my children is set up a joint account that required my signature for withdrawals when the children were young. Once they were old enough to take care of the account themselves, I took that contingency off. I remained as joint on the account while they were at college or working away from home so that I could have access while they were away. Once they were on their own for good, we closed the account and they opened their own at a bank where they were located.

    • zanin profile image

      zanin 

      7 years ago from London, England

      I think that opening a savings account and banking is so very important for young adults; this should be encouraged from an early age, as teenagers need to get into the habit of saving and managing finances. The filing system you mentioned is also a great idea. I will take your advice and , with their help, set one up for my sons, and they can maintain it. An inspiring hub. Thanks Nina

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)