ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How do You Survive Accident-Prone Children? How do your Children Survive being Accident-Prone (Part 1)

Updated on November 8, 2016
Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron is a retired Customer Service Rep. for Verizon. Colleges attended: Triton, Melrose Park, Illinois and Elgin, in Elgin, Illinois.

Are all Kids accident-prone?

How do you survive, and how do you help your children survive, whooping cough, cuts, bruises, getting lost and the everyday hazards of highly active children? I know, this sounds like all children go through this. But I felt like mine went through more than most.

Exposed to German measles

When Pregnant with my first son, I had a woman who came to visit me bringing her two children, both of whom had rubella also known as German measles. I did not know they had the disease, until a neighbor told me about the children having Rubella and thought measles are measles and still did not know the danger of being around this disease, especially for a pregnant woman.

While I did not know, I would like to think that my visitor did not know either:

  • Did not know that I was pregnant?
  • Did you know that pregnant women can contract German Measles from exposure, even if she had German Measles?
  • Did you know this disease can endanger and/or predispose the fetus to numerous disabilities?

Within a couple days of her visit, I broke out in a rash, with a fever. When I went to the doctor, I was asked if I was exposed to any children who were sick, when I told him that I had been. Doctor Dvorak informed me that I had Rubella (i.e. German measles) he also informed me of the danger to my unborn baby.

"Rubella in a pregnant woman can cause congenital rubella syndrome, with potentially devastating consequences for the developing fetus. Children who are infected with rubella before birth are at risk for growth retardation; mental retardation; malformations of the heart and eyes; deafness; and liver, spleen, and bone marrow problems."

Source: http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/skin/german_measles.html

My First Born Son

My Son Brett when he was first born
My Son Brett when he was first born | Source

All thoughts of any of the consequences of Rubella disappeared

When the beautiful little baby boy was placed in my arms all thoughts of any of the consequences of Rubella disappeared from my mind although he only weighed four pounds. He was born on his due date, and the doctor told me he could not find anything wrong with him, as he handed me a tiny little box with a gift from my son. He was born with a tooth. It was my son's tooth that was pulled. (I have that little box with the tooth, to this day.)


Whooping-cough

I see the TV commercial about the danger of infants getting whooping-Cough from their parents and I am reminded how serious this disease is. I never thought for one second that my baby could die, when at about two or three months old my little one got whooping-cough.

My Son Brett about 1 year Old

Brett about the time he was lost in the house
Brett about the time he was lost in the house | Source

How do you lose a baby in the house?

My son Brett got over the whooping-cough and at about nine months old, because he did not show any signs of trying to talk I made an appointment and took him for an audiology test, and was informed he was born deaf, as a result of the German measles.

Some days or week later, I let my son play on a mat on the floor, I looked away for only a moment and when I look back at the mat, he had vanished. In a panic I checked the doors they were still locked from the inside, I checked under everything, behind everything, anywhere he could hide.

He could climb upon the couch and onto chairs, but he was not on the couch or on any of the chairs. I could feel the tears welling up in my eyes, and then suddenly I heard a noise in the kitchen I looked but did not see him, then I saw one of the knick knacks on the floor that had been on the window seal.

A chair was pulled out from the table and the table was under the window, I ran to the window pulled the curtain back and there he sat grinning at me. He had climbed upon the chair, and from the chair upon the table then from the table upon the wide window seal.

The table got moved in a hurry. I could only imagine if he had fallen from up there. The Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) would never believe that this little boy could climb like that, when I couldn't believe it myself.


The Spider Monkey

Charles "Poochie" my then husband's best friend returned from vacationing in Florida with his wife and daughter and they brought a spider monkey back with them and told us he brought it for us as a gift. (Probably his wife did not want it and he was pawning it off on us.)

Bill was thrilled! We did not have a cage for him so we put him in a box for the night, but he got out of the box and the next morning he was on the shadow box (knack knack box that hangs on the wall) and had used the wall paper for toilet paper.

After he put the monkey back in the box, I told Bill, "when you come home from work take the monkey to the pet store" Bill said he would, but sometime before Bill got off work, the monkey got out of the box again, ran up to Brett and bit him on the finger.

I called Bill at work and told him I was taking the baby to the doctor because the monkey bit him, and the monkey better not be there when I come home.

I did not need this. I was about five or six months pregnant with my second baby and did not need this hassle.

The monkey was gone when I returned home and we never mentioned it again.


Birth of my second son Wally

My second son Wally
My second son Wally | Source

Accepted in a school for deaf children

At the age of two and a half Brett was accepted at the Henner Hearing and Speech Center for young deaf and hard of hearing children, in down town Chicago and I was enrolled in a Sign Language class at the same center. I had no baby sitter so I had to take Wally with me, and no one seemed to mind.

At the ripe old age of three and a half Brett had a 'Bilateral Myringotomy' at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago. The nurse took him from my arms and placed him in a crib with high sides and told me to go home.

As I was walking down the long hallway to the lobby I heard a loud commotion behind me and turned around to see Brett running after me with the hospital gown flying in back of him like Superman's cape. I held him to sooth his fears and they let me stay with him until he fell asleep.

The next morning when I arrived Brett was sitting in the crib looking so sad and over the crib was netting. I asked "Why?" "Brett must feel like he is being tortured." The nurse told me that during the night Brett had climbed out of the crib and went looking for me several times and the netting was to keep him in the crib. And I cried for my precious little boy.

What is a Bilateral Myringotomy?

Myringotomy (from Latin myringa "eardrum")is a surgical procedure in which a tiny incision is created in the eardrum to relieve pressure caused by excessive buildup of fluid, or to drain pus from the middle ear. A tympanostomy tube is inserted into the eardrum to keep the middle ear aerated for a prolonged time and to prevent re-accumulation of fluid. Without the insertion of a tube, the incision usually heals spontaneously in two to three weeks.

Source: http://www.chp.edu/our-services/ent/patient-procedures/bilateral-myringotomy

Lost again, this time in a store

I had gone shopping with three year old Brett and one and a half year old Wally. I think it was a Zayre Store in Chicago.

And while putting Wally in the shopping cart, then when I turned around to put Brett in the cart also, he was gone and was nowhere in sight. I could not call out to him, he would not hear me. I went to look for a sales person to announce over the intercom that a little boy was lost in the store.

Before I could find a sales person, I saw a crowd of people around the counter where makeup and perfume was sold. The crowd was laughing at something behind the counter and then I saw a sales person there also, as I headed in that direction, It was then that I saw him.

Brett was perched on a high stool behind the counter, in front of a mirror and the crowd was watching. He was trying on sun glasses and making faces at the mirror and the crowd. It was such a comical sight the crowd was laughing and cheering him on.

What a fright that can give a young mother.

Getting feedback from a hearing-aid

Brett had not turned four, when he was fitted with a hearing-aid. Not that he could hear with it, I think it just amplified the sound, but I was told that he needed it because he had been accepted at a main stream school that had a special need class.

Bill, who loved animals, had found a Doberman Pincher, and it seemed friendly, so he brought it home. He said it would be protection for me and the boys, until he could find out who the dog belonged to.

The Doberman had a light chain hooked onto a collard Bill bought and he left him in the wide hallway between the kitchen and living room where he made a bed for him when he left him to go to the store. I was not afraid of the dog, but did leave the chain on the collar with the loose end around a chair leg in the kitchen.

The boys had pulled toys into the living from their bedroom and were busy playing while I made breakfast, when suddenly Brett made a move that caused feedback from his hearing-aid. The dog started to growl and was getting up from where he was laying. I grabbed the chain and the sudden jerk by the dog caused me to sat down on the floor.

He was dragging me toward the door; I put one foot on each side of the door frame. I could feel my fingers getting numb from the grip on the chain. Then the Doberman relaxed a bit and as I was letting the chain go slack, there was another screech from the hearing-aid and I had to grip the chain again.

I don't know how long I sat there, praying that neither of my babies would come into the hallway, it seemed an eternity, before Bill came home, he took the Doberman to the service station where he worked and found the 'Lost Dog' post on a bulletin board.

Bill returned the Doberman to his owner.


"We can't sew up a tongue, lady"

Things went relatively normal for a few months, Wally did not crawl much, by nine months he was already running. Despite constant efforts to keep him from running the house, it was as if he could not slow down to a walk.

Wally always had his tongue hanging out. And, on one early afternoon he zoomed through the house and tripped and when he came down his chin hit the corner of the coffee table. There was so much blood, I thought he bit his tongue off. I gave him ice chips and called the hospital.

I could see his bottom teeth on top of his tongue and lifted it off the teeth, and continued to feed him ice chips, while I talked to the attendant at the hospital, who told me, "We can't sew up a tongue, lady" and click, he hung up. He didn't even tell me about the ice, I don't know why I just kept thinking 'ice chips keep the swelling down.'

The Shiner for Christmas

Christmas Day - L to R: Wally, Dad, Brother Darrell, Shyron, Mom, Brother Tony, Minnie (Bill's mother), and Niece Tina.
Christmas Day - L to R: Wally, Dad, Brother Darrell, Shyron, Mom, Brother Tony, Minnie (Bill's mother), and Niece Tina. | Source

A Shiner for Christmas

It was Christmas Eve and unusually warm for Chicago, my boys wanted to go outside, so I took them outside to play.

Anyone who thinks they know how fast a little kid can run, never met my Wally.

Brett and Wally were running and suddenly they are on a collision course and both looking in the opposite direction. I yelled Wally and they both turned just as they hit head-on. Brett's cheek bone struck Wally in the eye, and on Christmas day it was black (see picture above).

Bill's mother Minnie, was having Christmas Dinner at her house. My mom and dad and both my brothers were there. Before Dinner we had a family picture made and you could see Wally's shiner.

My brother Tony picked Wally up and pitched him up in the air, when he came down his feet hit Tony in the chest and he did a flip and landed on his head which knocked him out. Tony did CPR while I called for an ambulance.

He was conscious at Walther Memorial Hospital and they wanted to keep his for observation overnight. They had me wait outside the room while they were questioning him.

The questioning went something like this:

Q. "What happened to you tonight?"

A. "First I was up, and then I was down."

Q. "How did you get a black eye?"

A. "I ran into my brother"

Walther Memorial Hospital closed in 1987.

How do You Survive Accident-Prone Children? How do your Children Survive being Accident-Prone (Part 2)

Coming soon, Part 2.

Appendectomy

The Concussion

The Dirt Bike

Swinging from the Monkey Bars

Broken Foot

Not all bumps and bruises lead to sore endings

Cycling

Maybe a few other things I might remember as I write part 2

© 2013 Shyron E Shenko

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 12 months ago from Texas

      My dear friend, thank you again for the compliment, comment and for sharing. Praying all is well with you.

      Blessings and hugs.

      Did not get the grass cut yesterday so I have to do it today.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 12 months ago from North Texas

      Been a while since I read this hub. Going to share it again and pin it to Awesome Hubpages. Hope all is well there . . .

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 21 months ago from Texas

      Thank you for the comment and sharing. I don't know about girls being easier. As my son says If you have a boy, you worry about one little boy, if you have a little girl you worry about all the little boys.

      Blessings and hugs my dear friend

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 21 months ago from North Texas

      Back to read this and be glad I didn't have so much to go through. I think girls are easier. Wanted a boy, too, but it was not to be. Sharing . . .

      Hugs . . . take care . .

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago from Texas

      Au fait, thank you for the comments. I put New Skin

      (i. e. liquid Bandage) on the cut, it is amazing stuff.

      Little cooler? You mean not quite so hot?

      Blessings and Hugs and you take care also.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      I was tested and had German measles long ago now. Well anyway, thought this article might be helpful since school is out for the summer and parents must deal with their own kids for a while.

      So sorry you got hit so hard by that branch. Life isn't fair. Seriously. I hope you're better now. You maybe should see the doc if you haven't already. Sounds like you may have been hurt worse than you thought.

      Little cooler at night, but still too hot. Take better care of yourself. Easier said than done, I know, but if something really awful happened, who would do these things in your place?

      Blessings and hugs. Take care . . .

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago from Texas

      Lady Guinevere, I am happy for her, I prefer boys. My granddaughter is expecting her second baby, she feels it is a boy but does not know yet. Please forgive me for taking so long to get back to you.

      Blessings and hugs to you dear friend.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago from Texas

      Au fait, thank you for sharing this again and for the comments and up votes.

      Yes, the weather was nice, so to take so long to get back to you.

      Blessings and hugs dear friend.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago from Texas

      Patricia, thank you for the Angels always, thank you for the comment.

      I am glad you dad got his miracle.

      Blessings and hugs to you dear friend.

      Shyron

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 2 years ago from West By God

      She is 36 now and has two boys. The odest boy is just like her....the mother's curse, Hahahaha!

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago from Texas

      Lady Guinevere, thank you so much for the comments. I do appreciate you.

      How is your daughter now? My younger son's last accident was last year and he is a grandfather.

      Blessings and Hugs my friend.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      My Daddy used to say that if we lived to be 21 it was a miracle since so many accidents happened to us kids.

      My own child and her children not so much on the accidents but other things made up for it.

      Angels are on the way to you ps

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 2 years ago from West By God

      Never a dull moment at your house. Good golly miss molly you have had some times there with the boys. I thought my daughter was accident prone but you take the cake.

      My oldest backed up inot a nail sticking out of a board in the hallway...twice. We don't know how that happened. Then going to bed one night there was a wasp in her sheets and she got stung three times before she made it out of the bed. When she was in second grade she fell on the monkey bars...the one that is a dome and landed between her legs. She got strept throat once but would not tkae the meds. Got her to get them in her mouth and she wpit them out all over the sheets. That was grape flavored. The ER was getting used to us bringng her in all the time.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      Giving this another share. I'm thinking there must be other women out there who had or are having similar experiences and who would be comforted to know they aren't alone.

      Voting this up and UI, also sharing as I said.

      We're to have some really nice weather this weekend. Hope they got that right, because they sure missed it yesterday and las' hight. Take care . . .

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Just thought I would come back and give this interesting article another share and pin to AH.

      Hope all is well with you and John and that you aren't out in this awful heat. It's so bad that my a/c won't keep up. By late afternoon it's 80 some degrees in here and didn't cool off until well after midnight. Chilly in here now, but in a few hours it will be hot. Yesterday's high was said to be only 97 F., but I find that hard to believe. Today is again supposed to be 100. It will be even hotter where you are so I hope you're planning to stay inside. Blessing to you dear friend. I just want you to be comfortable and stay healthy -- both of you.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Peg, thank you so much for your comments. I did not think much about all the accidents until I started writing the stories, I know there are several I missed.

      I am glad your friend's son got the treatment he needed to recover.

      Blessings

      Shyron

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      You really survived some incredible things with your children, Shyron. That incident with the German measles was awful, along with the spider monkey and the Doberman. Wow.

      I had a friend who had four boys, one of which was terribly accident prone. He was hit by a car in the school crossing zone due to a motorist's neglect of obeying the speed limit and ignoring the crossing guard's instructions. He was dragged several feet and suffered severe tissue loss to his leg. To see him afterward you'd never have known it. He recovered nicely after a few surgeries.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Blond Logic, I would love to read about your experiences, and adventures. I hope things have calmed down by now.

      I would love to see the picture of your son when he looked like a raccoon.

      It makes me happy that you daughter did not have German measles.

      I guess that is what makes life interesting. My son is a grandfather and he still has not slowed down. He was in the hospital March 5th 2014. Sure hope that is the last time.

      Thank you Blond Logic for reading, commenting and sharing.

      Blessings.

      Shyron

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 3 years ago from Brazil

      I can relate to the clumsiness of children, my son has dyspraxia and he was always falling over things. He is beginning to look like a patchwork quilt with all the stitches he has had over the years.

      Just like your family photo, I have one of my son eating birthday cake with both eyes black and blue. He looked like a raccoon.

      I can relate to the uncertainty of coming into contact with measles whilst pregnant. My daughter, although immunized, developed measles when I was carrying my second. I was so worried as you were about possible complications. Hers were in fact, not German measles but the emotional upheavel it caused was awful.

      Your hub is a wonderful slice of the ups and downs of family life. Shared.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Au fait, I am sorry you are stressed, but happy you came back to read this again. Thank you for the comment, votes, pin and for sharing.

      Blessings my dear friend.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      I think it's good to read this when life gets too complicated or stressed if only to see that other people in the world must face challenges sometimes too. Voted up and AUI. Pinned to AH and shared.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Peggy, thank you for reading about my boys. I am glad we got rid of the monkey and found owner of the doberman also. I did not know how contagious German measles were, so the woman probably did not know either, but everything happens for a reason.

      Thank you dear friend for your comments.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      You certainly had some adventures in rearing your young boys. Glad you got rid of that monkey before it did more damage and glad the rightful owner of that doberman dog was found. It was a shame you were exposed to the German measles when you were pregnant. Did that person not realize how contagious it was?

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you Mighty Mom, sorry the picture of the boys making mud pies are in chapter 3.

      You are welcome, will go and read yout other hubs.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you Mighty Mom, sorry the picture of the boys making mud pies are in chapter 3.

      You are welcome, will go and read yout other hubs.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you Mighty Mom, sorry the picture of the boys making mud pies are in chapter 3.

      You are welcome, will go and read yout other hubs.

    • Mighty Mom profile image

      Susan Reid 3 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

      Hi Shyron,

      I could go read Chapter 2 and 3 -- more likely places, as the boys are just toddlers here:-).

      I haven't written a personal hub in some time.

      "How to find a rehab for your teen" should give you a clue...

      But there are other related topics I could expound upon that might be useful to other parents struggling to understand/cope with kids who are "out of the mold."

      Thanks for the suggestion!!

      MM

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      vandynegl, Thank you for reading and commenting on this article. I don't know how I missed your comment from 3 weeks ago, but I did. I am sorry.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Mighty Mom, I do appreciate you reading and commenting on this hub.

      I thought the picture of the boys making mud-pies was on this on, I am glad to know where it is now I have to go get it from chapter 3 and put it on here. It may belong on chapter 2.

      I hope you will write about your son's exploits, children's adventures are always interesting.

      Shyron

    • Mighty Mom profile image

      Susan Reid 3 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

      Hi Shyron,

      Thank you for commenting on my Mud Pie Poetry hub and inviting me over to read about your accident-prone children.

      My heart is in my mouth reading about these early episodes.

      These do seem well beyond the usual childhood bumps and scrapes.

      Although, I only raised one boy, not two.

      He got through his young years pretty much unscathed.

      But MORE than made up for it from 12-18:-)!

      Thanks for sharing your family's exploits. Good reading!

      MM

    • vandynegl profile image

      vandynegl 3 years ago from Ohio Valley

      Very interesting! Despite the setbacks from being hearing impaired, your boys sound like mine! It is always something.....Thank you for sharing your stories!

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Au fait, thank you for reading this again, and for commenting, for your awesome vote and pinning. I do appreciate you so much.

      I don't remember waking up and wondering/dreading what the day might bring.

      The boys were early birds and I remember listening for sounds, so I would know when they got up. Then I would be much to busy to worry about what might happen.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Stopped by to read this again. This past week has been pretty challenging for me and will continue to be until the bank makes their decision. I know they are different kinds of challenges than you faced with your sons, but they are challenges that must be met just the same.

      How did you get through all that time when at a certain point you must have awakened some mornings wondering, and perhaps almost dreading, what that day might bring?

      Voted up and awesome! Sharing again. Also pinning to 'Awesome Hubpages.'

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you Au fait for reading this again, vote up, and sharing. You are right I would not trade my sons for anything, not even a girl.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      I'm sure you wouldn't trade your sons for anything in the world, but after reading this I'm so glad I had a daughter! :) My daughter's father kept telling me boys were a big headache -- he was the youngest of 3 sons.

      Voted up and awesome again and also shared again.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you Mary, (tillsontitan) for reading, commenting, votes up. You are so appreciated.

      When I started this hub, I thought it would be one, then it was 'Chapter 2' and Chapter 3 is almost done and it may turn out to be Chapter 4.

      I was on the phone with son Walter yesterday and my house phone rang.

      My son said if you want to get that, I will call you back in a few minutes. I answered the other phone and talked with Au fait for an hour. I told her "Walter was suppose to call me back, I hope he did not have an accident or something." Walter answered with "I'm ok mom, I just had someone come to visit. That is how in tune he is.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      I think all boys are accident prone. Having had two sons I (or they) have weathered stitches in their chin, over the eye, a broken elbow, salmonella, chicken pox (one son had them twice), convulsions, cuts and bruises, and more...I guess that's the price they pay for being boys. However, it sounds like you certainly had a run for your money!

      Voted up, useful, funny, and interesting.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you craftytothecore for reading and commenting. These are the minor accidents, the bigger ones came later.

      I hope that your son is accident free now, and I hope mine are too. I know about autism, my grandson is autistic. 'Why Don't We Have Inline Skating In The US Olympic Games?'

      I did not write about his autism, but gets banged-up a lot speed skating. He is in college right now. Sometimes I think we are all autistic, at different degrees.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you craftytothecore for reading and commenting. These are the minor accidents, the bigger ones came later.

      I hope that your son is accident free now, and I hope mine are too. I know about autism, my grandson is autistic. 'Why Don't We Have Inline Skating In The US Olympic Games?'

      I did not write about his autism, but gets banged-up a lot speed skating. He is in college right now. Sometimes I think we are all autistic, at different degrees.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you moonlake for reading and commenting, voting up and sharing. I sure hope things have calmed for you.

      These are the minor accidents, the bigger ones came later.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you craftytothecore for reading and commenting.

      I hope that your son is accident free now, and I hope mine are too.

      These are the minor accidents, the bigger ones came later.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      So interesting. Your real-life stories are so touching. My son has Autism so I can totally relate to an accident-prone child. My son loves wrapping himself up in blankets. He was an early walker. He walked around 10-11 months. One day while sitting on the couch, he had his blanket wrapped around him and suddenly jumped off to the hard-wood floor. I didn't even have time to respond, but I was sitting right there next to him. Next thing I know he slides across the floor in to the corner of a wooden cabinet. He hit face first on his forehead. I was in panic mode. I called the doctor. They said if an egg pops out on his forehead, he'll be fine. It did. But then I had to explain that one everywhere I went. Another time he came running across the floor and crashed in to my hand. I was wearing jewelry. It rips a gash in his forehead. Luckily he didn't need stitches, but I took him to the doctor to get him looked at.

      This was all before he was diagnosed too!

      I totally feel for you and thank you for writing about this.

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 3 years ago from America

      I have an accident prone son, our oldest. One of our son's also had German measles when he was young and my friend was pregnant at the time. Luckily she had the measles at some time in her life. The doctors were very upset that she had been exposed to them but we didn't know. Sorry

      There were some kids that came over and played with us when I was young kept coughing. My mother had a fit she was positive they had whopping cough. Their mother said they didn’t have whopping cough. Well they did and all four of us got it. I remember it and how awful it was.

      Great hub voted up and shared.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Thank you DDE for your comment and complements and up votes. I really appreciate you.

      This hub covers the mild stuff, more to come that is not so mild.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image
      Author

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Au fait, thank you for your comments, the up-votes and sharing an pinning.

      Thanks for researching the information on here also. I know that Red Measles and Rubella are different. I know that I got Rubella when I was pregnant, and you are probably correct that I had Red Measles when I was a child. I was never vaccinated against anything when I was a child and had Whooping Cough, Mumps, Chicken Pox, and Rheumatic Fever. (Mom did not believe in vaccinations.)

      The spider monkey: I believe that Poochie, wanted it and when they found how nasty it is in the house, they passed him off on us.

      Yes, Walter matured and did not want to be called Wally anymore. You told me about losing your daughter in the store. I am so glad you found her and she was/is alright.

      Thanks again, my dear friend for your loyalty.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Wow! this is one of your best hubs so interesting to know more about your experiences. lovely family photo with a well written hub voted up, interesting and is certainly worth reading

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      What an interesting life you have had!

      Red Measles and Rubella (German Measles) are two different diseases. Nearly everyone in my age group had Red Measles as a child. Some people get the two confused and think they are the same disease and therefor immune to German Measles when in fact they may only be immune to the Red Measles. I had both before age 14, and as a result I am immune to both.

      If you have been vaccinated against Rubella, or if you have had that disease, you cannot get it again, pregnant or not, and pass it on to your child. I verified this before writing this comment.

      I also had Whooping Cough, Mumps, and Chicken Pox, as well as Scarlet Fever and pneumonia. All my siblings had these diseases except for Scarlet Fever, and one of my brothers had pneumonia for a long time -- that's where I got it.

      I can't believe someone brought you a spider monkey without first asking if you wanted one. It's not the same as perfume or candy, ya know?

      Very interesting hub. (I didn't know Walter was Wally.) I lost my daughter in the Disney Store in the Boston area when she was 4. That was awful for both of us even though it was only for about 5 minutes. Terrible things went through my mind before I heard her yell "Mommy" in the most horribly frightened voice you can imagine. It was a fairly small store and that was helpful.

      Voted up, AI, pinned, and will share.