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Expressing milk

Updated on June 21, 2014

Expressing Milk - Who, Why and how!

Not every woman can breastfeed and not everyone wants to, but if you have milk and feeding from the breast isn't possible then full time expressing should be considered as an exclusive feeding option.

Unfortunately there is a lack of support for this type of feeding with many women encouraged to just go onto formula if they can't feed from the breast. It isn't by any means an easy option (although every type of feeding has its positives and negatives) but if you want your baby to get all the health and nutritional benefits of breastmilk then it is certainly possible to exclusively feed expressed milk for as long as needed.

I expressed for a whole year and learnt lots of things about breastmilk and making the most of what nature gave me.

Photo: Here is a picture of my cute boy at just over 3 months, fed exclusively on breastmilk.

My Expressing journey

Before my son was born I was determined I would breastfeed. It was important to me that he got all the health benefits of breastmilk and I really didn't want all the routines involved in making formula. When he was born he had other ideas though and would either fall asleep or scream when put to the breast. Despite help from several nurses and midwives, 6 hours after he was born we made the decision to give him formula. This felt like a massive failure to me.

As he was a caesarean section birth he had some fluids in his stomach still and he began to vomit up all the formula that was given to him. By day 3 he was screaming with a combination of hunger and reflux pain and was being fed just 10ml of formula every 4 hours through a tube in his nose, most of what went in came back out.

It was a very distressing time. What should have been the most natural thing in the world wasn't happening for us. We tried shields, various positions and tried to nurse at every feeding time with no success. We had midwives helping throughout my stay in hospital but despite everyone's best efforts he wasn't feeding well and wasn't thriving on either regular or lactose free formula.

So 3 days after his birth I decided to try expressing. I felt that breastmilk was what he needed and I spent a frantic afternoon searching the internet for advice and information on how to go about providing the breastmilk my baby needed without actually breastfeeding. It seemed I had missed the boat with most websites telling me I should have started pumping straight after the birth.

I found the task ahead extremely daunting. I bought a secondhand manual breast pump from a friend (an Avent Isis) and gave it a go. Manual breast pumps are not the most glamorous things to use, they squeak and fart and you feel like a dairy cow being milked. Despite no milk leaving my body for 3 days after the birth, I was hugely impressed with myself though as I managed to express 40ml of orangey-yellow colostrum in my first session.

For the next 3 days, I fed the baby 20ml of breastmilk every 2 hours, changed him, put him back to sleep then expressed again. I was making just enough milk to keep this up but It doesn't need to be said that I got pretty much zero sleep. The breast milk worked wonders and within a day he really began to pick up. He stopped losing weight, stopped screaming with pain (and hunger) and was not vomiting so much. By day 6 we were discharged from hospital.

I continued expressing at every feed. I was lucky that my husband had 5 weeks off work so I had a lot of support which allowed me to concentrate on establishing my milk supply. We did still top up with formula for the first few days but by the fourth week, I was starting to freeze excess milk. I continued to express and exclusively feed expressed breastmilk until we started weaning at 6 months. I then carried on expressing until 10 days after his first birthday.

Get the Avent Isis manual pump

My manual Avent Isis pump was my best friend in the early days.

How much milk will I need to make?

All babies are different and some will drink a lot more or less than others. I recorded how much milk my baby drank each day for the first 9 months and have listed the amounts at the bottom of this page.

Babies requirements for breastmilk are lower than if they were drinking formula, as breastmilk is more efficiently digested by the body. Most breastmilk fed babies will take around 90-150 ml (3-5 oz) in each feed whilst many formula fed babies will take over 200ml (7-8 oz). Breastfed babies demands for milk don't increase from 1-6 months so they should still want around the same amount at 5 months as they did at 2 months. The average intake for babies between 1 and 6 months old is 750 ml a day (25 oz)

The first few days after birth your milk will be almost yellowy orange in colour, this is colostrum and you will get only a small amount of this. Baby only has a very tiny stomach at this stage: the size of a marble so don't worry if it doesn't seem much. Around day 5 your milk should come in, you will know when this happens as your breasts will feel very full and heavy. At this stage your supply should increase to between 500ml-800ml per day.

Your milk will then go a more buttery colour and you will start to produce larger quantities. If by day 10 your supply is lower than 750ml you may need to take a supplement such as fenugreek, Metodopramide (reglan) or Domperidone (motilium). If your supply at 10 days is less than 500ml and you have tried all methods to increase supply then you may have to consider mix feeding or formula feeding. By around 3 weeks your supply should be established and fairly reliable, you may be able to pump less often or go longer between expressing sessions, although some people find they have to maintain a rigourous expressing schedule to maintain supply.

To work out how much milk you need you can multiply the number of feeds your baby has per day by the amount of milk in each feed. Breastmilk digests quickly so feeds would normally be between 1.5 - 3 hours apart. Breastmilk is digested efficiently and so each feed is generally smaller than the equivalent in formula.

A baby's stomach capacity is tiny. At 1 day old, it can hold around 5-7ml. By 3 days it can hold around 22-27ml. This increases to 45-60ml by 1 week and 80-150ml by 1 month old.

Trick your body into making more milk

Many people will tell you that a pump is never going to be as efficient as getting breastmilk out as a baby is. This may be true if you breastfeed and also express but if you exclusively express then the pump is your baby. Ugly as it may be, don't hate your pump. You need to be producing love hormones to make lots of milk so think nice thoughts about your pump. Keep your baby nearby, or even look at a picture of it to keep the hormones flowing while you pump.

I used 2 pumps. A manual Avent Isis pump and an electric Mothercare Innosense pump. I believe that by using the two different pumps at different times of the day I tricked my body into thinking it was feeding 2 babies. I stopped using the manual pump after about 5 months and my supply dropped quite sharply at this point. The manual is tiresome compared to the electric and is hard going on the forearms but it is useful to have a back up pump for when you haven't had chance to sterilise your pump since the last session, or when you need to pump quietly. If you are in a public place a manual pump is often easier and more discreet to operate.

Figures on how much milk I produced each day and how many times a day I expressed can be found at the bottom of this page.

How to choose a breast pump

There is a huge variety of breastpumps on sale these days. It is actually a daunting and complicated prospect trying to choose which is best. I already had my manual pump when the baby was born but wasn't expecting to use it. As I was confined to hospital when my son was born it was left to my husband to go and buy me an electric one to make the job easier.

From advice I found on-line, Medela seemed to be the most recommended brand and the "swing" model the most popular. So I sent my husband off to find out prices and what was available. The Medela models were priced between 150-180 Euro which was an expense we hadn't budgeted for and really was beyond what I wanted to spend. So my husband chose a Mothercare own model pump from their Innosense range.

At that time the Innosense range had only recently been launched and so there were few reviews available online, but the price (around 85 Euro) was reasonable and so we gave it a go. Like all pumps it has it's plus points and negatives but overall I was pleased with the pump and it served me well for a year. It could also be run on battery power as well as mains electric which I found very useful on long car journeys.

The improvements I would make to it would be to change the body from frosted to clear plastic so you could easier see what was coming out, and to improve the valve which often got overwhelmed by fast flow of milk.

I found I would generally spend around 10-15 minutes on each breast to empty it fully. Double breast pumps can do the job quicker than a single, but do give more of a dairy cow feel to the whole process. Electric pumps are generally quicker but may not empty the breast fully if they don't vary in speed or pressure, a good pump will gradually increase in pressure or allow you to control the pace, simulating a baby's sucking. A manual pump can allow you to vary the pace and pressure and is much quieter, although will probably take longer to empty the breast.

I found it best to have both a manual and an electric pump and this certainly made keeping on top of the sterilising easier. If you need to pump every 3-4 hours, sometimes the time to clean and sterilise your pump isn't available so having a back up was a lifesaver at times.

Did you express milk?

How long did you express for?

See results

Increasing and maintaining milk production

Top tips for top milk!

Empty each breast as thoroughly as possible each time. Continue expressing for a couple of minutes after the last drops. Pumping for 2-5 minutes after the flow stops tells the breasts to produce more next time. Some people recommend hand expressing to finish, I never did this but I found squeezing whilst pumping effective.

Massage breasts before and during expressing. A good 5 minute massage before you start will encourage the milk ducts to start flowing. In the early days you may not get more than a few seconds of massage before the milk leaks out. collect as much as you can, don't waste any.

Skin to skin with baby and bringing baby to your breast will increase your output. The hormones needed to produce milk are released when you are close to your baby.

Express while looking at the baby or are close to it, or even looking at a picture of it to raise your hormone levels. If you pump in a room away from your baby, especially in the early days, you may find you will produce less milk. Don't worry about the sound of the pump waking the baby. The hum of the pump is great background noise and may actually send the baby to sleep.

Express every 2-3 hours round the clock until supply is established. Prolactin (the hormone that makes milk) is at its highest between 1am and 5am so try to pump at least once between these hours. You need to mimic a newborn's feeding pattern to train your body to produce regularly enough.

Once your supply is established take a break of 4-5 hours at least once in every 24 period (to simulate baby's night time sleep), but don't go more than 6 hours without expressing.

You may find it handy to keep a chart of your schedule to keep track of times and number of sessions. From the research I did online, the suggested number of expressing sessions per day was 8. I only expressed 8 times for the first week or so, I was down to 7 times by week 3 then dropped down to 5 times by 3 months. I continued at 4 times a day until 7 months, when I dropped to 3. My supply dropped gradually as I pumped less times.

You will produce more milk if you rest so if you need to, skip a pumping session and sleep. You will produce more if you are relaxed and rested and look after your own health.

Keep drinking lots of fluids, you will feel thirsty and will dehydrate easily. Breast milk has a high water content as it is also a drink for your baby so several litres of water each day are needed or your supply will drop.

Avoid sugar free and diet drinks as most contain phenylalanine which lowers prolactin levels.

Eat oats, jumbo rolled oats you cook on the hob are best but you could also try snacking on muesli, flapjacks, oatcakes or cereal bars. You will feel hungry as milk production can burn 500-800 calories a day. Eat well. Take iron and calcium supplements if your diet isn’t high in these.

Don’t set alarms to wake up and express in the night, you will produce more if you wake naturally. Rely on your baby to wake you and express when they wake (after they've fed or while someone else feeds is best)

Add shorter less productive sessions to raise supply by telling your body to make more. An extra expressing session can encourage it to make a little more. It takes 1-4 days for breasts to respond to changes in demand though so just one extra session probably won't do a great deal.

Don’t take decongestants or medicines containing pseudoephedrine, as it lowers supply.

La Leche League Sleep Nursing & Maternity Bra, Black Jacquard, Large
La Leche League Sleep Nursing & Maternity Bra, Black Jacquard, Large

Good comfortable nursing bra's make life much easier.

 

My flirtation with formula feeding.

Expressing full time is mentally as well as physically challenging. You have to stay positive about expressing and stay focused on why you chose to do it. If you can't remember why you are doing it or don't want to do it anymore, then nothing is stopping you from going and buying formula.

Mix feeding is considered to be a "best of both worlds" situation for many with both formula and breastmilk being fed at different times. Some women choose to top up with formula, especially at night as it takes longer for the baby to digest and so can make them sleep a little longer through the night. If you choose to include formula in your baby's diet then there is a good chance your milk production will rapidly decline unless you continue to express as much as before. You would have 2 options at this point, either go with formula feeding full time or attempt to increase milk production, which isn't always possible once it drops.

Switching to or supplementing with formula isn't always easy. At 5 months and again at 8 months I tried to introduce formula. Apart from during his first week, my baby had had only breastmilk and by 5 months I was finding expressing very hard going. The baby was more active and was sleeping less. The time I had in between feeds was minimal, I was exhausted from lack of sleep and my husband was working 7 days a week at that time. My milk supply was dropping, and I was only expressing 4 times a day by then but despite the tiredness I tried to increase to 5 or 6 times a day. This really wasn't sustainable and didn't produce much more milk for the extra effort.

I tried to introduce formula, just one feed a day to take the pressure off myself. At 5 months though, the baby is starting to know what it likes and what it does not like. Formula smells very different, personally I think it stinks so maybe he picked up on my negative thoughts, it's also a lot thicker and obviously tastes different. He took maybe 50ml - 80ml of formula here and there but wasn't enthusiastic and within a week it was outright refused, despite trying 3 different brands of formula and 3 different types of bottles, a sippy cup, hot milk, cold milk etc.

We decided to start weaning at 5 and a half months and muddled through with what I was expressing, some frozen milk, and introduced a range of solids which combined provided enough food for him. At 8 months I wanted to give up expressing. He had taken well to solids and was enjoying a range of new tastes so I tried again to introduce formula. My milk supply had dropped yet again but it was way too early for him to wean off milk completely. I was producing around 300-400ml a day which was less than the recommended amount that he should have been drinking.

It didn't work out and he once again refused any attempts to get him to drink formula. He was drinking less and less breastmilk though and much preferred eating solids. He was drinking a lot less milk than I expected at this stage and compared to other babies so I did worry whether he was getting enough calcium and other nutrients. Around 11 months I started to mix the little milk I was producing with cows milk and this was generally accepted but only when he was sleepy. He quickly reduced to one small milk feed a day. I was expressing first thing in the morning and last thing at night only and the freedom to go all day without having to pump was lovely.

By his first birthday I decided to drop to expressing just once a day, in the morning to match his one milk feed a day. My milk supply was virtually non existent at this point, around 100ml a day so within a couple of weeks I decided to stop altogether. We continued offering a cows milk feed but he wasn't very keen and never finished a bottle.

Some days will feel like this

Photo: Scott Bauer courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Public Domain, via Wikimedia Commons
Photo: Scott Bauer courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Public Domain, via Wikimedia Commons

The bad points about expressing

You have to feel happy and confident in your decision to express otherwise you will quickly start to feel like a slave to the pump and restricted in your day to day life. Many women will give up inside 1 month.

Feeling like a slave to the pump is common. It may seem that you're constantly attached to your pump like a dairy cow. Negative feelings towards your pump will result in a lower output of milk so try and remain positive. Think of your pump as a baby you have to feed. Remember why you decided to express in the first place and be determined to stick to your regime however hard it may seem. This time will pass quicker than you know.

You will find yourself in a grey area with little support from breastfeeding women and little from formula feeding women. Most people will not understand why you make things harder for yourself and create work by expressing.

You will worry endlessly about dwindling milk supply. Are you making enough, is the baby getting all it needs, should I express more, What if my milk dries up. There isn't much you can do about the worrying.

You may find you prefer to stay at home rather than go anywhere due the equipment you have to carry around and the inconvenience of finding somewhere to express whilst out in public places. It is possible to express almost anywhere, especially if you have a manual or battery operated pump. Bring along a cool bag and ice pack for the milk or feed it as needed.

Expect to not have a huge amount of free time, especially in the early days. A supportive partner, family members or home help is essential. A baby's routine is usually repetitive every 2 to 3 hours and once you add expressing into your timetable you will need to be super efficient. Catching up on sleep or housework while the baby naps may not be possible. You will be sleep deprived anyway with a newborn plus milk production burns up a lot of energy (as well as calories). Once you factor in expressing and then cleaning and sterilising equipment you will not get much rest.

Having someone else feed the baby whiles you express may be the easiest way to manage in the early days after birth to get your supply established and produce enough milk but this can mean lack of bonding time with baby.

As with breast feeding, you can expect sore and cracked nipples and heavy full breasts.

You will need quite a lot of equipment. Pumps, storage cups, freezer bags, bottles, teats, steriliser, bottle brush and nursing bra's are the basics.

Storing your milk

Expressing on demand for each feed is highly impractical and so you will need to store your expressed milk. Breastmilk can be stored in the fridge until it's needed or can be frozen for up to 6 months. Try and put only as much as your baby will drink at each feed into each container to avoid waste and contamination.

You can express directly into the bottle you will feed with, however it is more practical and efficient to use storage containers in the fridge and then transfer the right amount into feeding bottles when needed. Otherwise you will need lots of bottles and a large fridge! Avent and other companies do storage containers which can also be connected to their pumps for expressing and teats for feeding. Milk storage bags are ideal for the freezer as you just pour the milk into them, seal them and they stand upright. Always leave space at the top of the bag or container as the milk will expand when it freezes. Remember to mark the date on each storage bag.

Different sources state different guidelines on the amount of time milk is good for when refrigerated. If in doubt, smell it. It gets pretty funky when it's off. Human milk smells a little like cows milk. It smells nothing like formula. You can usually keep the milk at room temperature for an hour if you are coming up to feeding time, some sources suggest up to 4 hours. In the fridge, it is usually ok for 2-3 days but personally I tried to always use expressed milk within 24 hours and freeze any excess.

As breastmilk has a high water content, when stored it will separate into a thin, watery blue/green layer at the bottom and a thick cream layer on the top. Do not shake breastmilk, just swirl gently. The fat will separate from the whey on storage, so standing the storage cups upside for a few minutes or warming (if using straight away) will mix the milk.

Milk storage essentials

To express full time you need to be efficient so having your milk storage systems organised is essential.

Lansinoh Breastmilk Storage Bags, 25-Count Boxes (Pack of 3)
Lansinoh Breastmilk Storage Bags, 25-Count Boxes (Pack of 3)

The best thing for storing excess milk in the freezer.

 

Using refrigerated and frozen milk

Most babies won't take milk straight from the fridge and cold milk can make some babies vomit it straight back up so warm expressed milk by standing the bottle or storage cup in a jug or pan of hot water for a couple of minutes. Alternatively it can be ran under the tap until warm enough. Test the temperature of the milk on the inside of the wrist as you would with formula.

Frozen breastmilk needs to be used straight away once it's defrosted. It goes off a lot quicker than when it's fresh. Either thaw under a running tap or in the fridge. Frozen breastmilk tends to separate and can smell almost soapy compared to fresh breastmilk.

It isn't recommended to microwave breastmilk or to thaw frozen breastmilk in the microwave as it can cause hotspots.

Don't mix freshly expressed milk with that which has been previously cooled or frozen unless you are about to feed it straight away as the warmer fresh milk with raise the overall temperature of the milk and increase the speed it will spoil.

Cleaning your pump and equipment

Breast pumps need to be kept clean and it is best to sterilise all the parts after each use. Breastmilk is greasy and sticks to bottles and pumps. A sturdy bottle brush is need to scrub everything with hot soapy water before sterilising. Choose a steriliser with space for all your pumping equipment and not just bottles.

Munchkin Steam Guard Electric Sterilizer
Munchkin Steam Guard Electric Sterilizer

Make sure your steriliser has space for your pump, suction pad and storage cups as well as bottles.

 
Chicco 00069189200000 3-In-1 Bottle Brush 0 M+
Chicco 00069189200000 3-In-1 Bottle Brush 0 M+

I found this brush to last longest against vigorous cleaning

 

Milk Output vs Milk Consumption

I recorded how much milk I expressed and how much the baby drank from one week after he was born for 9 months.

The records below show how much milk I produced each day, How many times each time I expressed milk and how much milk the baby drank each day.

My Milk Productiion

How much milk I made!

10-Mar525ML

11-Mar635ML

12-Mar640ML

13-Mar730ML

14-Mar780ML

15-Mar940ML

16-Mar820ML

17-Mar800ML

18-Mar1050ML

19-Mar880ML

20-Mar1090ML

21-Mar1010ML

22-Mar990ML

23-Mar1100ML

24-Mar1110ML

25-Mar1060ML

26-Mar1180ML

27-Mar1210ML

28-Mar1000ML

29-Mar1270ML

30-Mar1320ML

31-Mar1140ML

01-Apr1250ML

02-Apr1140ML

03-Apr1260ML

04-Apr1140ML

05-Apr1320ML

06-Apr1230ML

07-Apr1130ML

08-Apr1270ML

09-Apr1270ML

10-Apr1190ML

11-Apr1160ML

12-Apr1260ML

13-Apr1260ML

14-Apr1240ML

15-Apr1390ML

16-Apr1300ML

17-Apr1260ML

18-Apr1140ML

19-Apr1380ML

20-Apr1160ML

21-Apr1390ML

22-Apr1260ML

23-Apr1310ML

24-Apr1370ML

25-Apr1200ML

26-Apr1350ML

27-Apr1240ML

28-Apr1200ML

29-Apr1300ML

30-Apr1380ML

01-May1230ML

02-May1340ML

03-May1240ML

04-May1260ML

05-May1320ML

06-May1230ML

07-May1230ML

08-May1330ML

09-May1260ML

10-May1170ML

11-May1280ML

12-May1250ML

13-May1290ML

14-May1050ML

15-May1250ML

16-May1220ML

17-May1180ML

18-May1280ML

19-May1130ML

20-May1260ML

21-May1260ML

22-May1220ML

23-May1060ML

24-May1270ML

25-May1290ML

26-May1210ML

27-May1230ML

28-May1180ML

29-May1270ML

30-May1150ML

31-May1150ML

01-Jun1200ML

02-Jun1150ML

03-Jun1120ML

04-Jun1170ML

05-Jun1150ML

06-Jun1100ML

07-Jun1150ML

08-Jun1060ML

09-Jun1110ML

10-Jun1160ML

11-Jun1140ML

12-Jun1070ML

13-Jun1060ML

14-Jun1070ML

15-Jun1130ML

16-Jun1060ML

17-Jun1060ML

18-Jun990ML

19-Jun1140ML

20-Jun1190ML

21-Jun1180ML

22-Jun1100ML

23-Jun1140ML

24-Jun1110ML

25-Jun1110ML

26-Jun1020ML

27-Jun1100ML

28-Jun1070ML

29-Jun1090ML

30-Jun1020ML

01-Jul1020ML

02-Jul1070ML

03-Jul1020ML

04-Jul980ML

05-Jul1040ML

06-Jul960ML

07-Jul960ML

08-Jul970ML

09-Jul930ML

10-Jul930ML

11-Jul980ML

12-Jul920ML

13-Jul980ML

14-Jul950ML

15-Jul900ML

16-Jul960ML

17-Jul980ML

18-Jul960ML

19-Jul970ML

20-Jul990ML

21-Jul910ML

22-Jul1000ML

23-Jul940ML

24-Jul910ML

25-Jul960ML

26-Jul930ML

27-Jul940ML

28-Jul910ML

29-Jul920ML

30-Jul960ML

31-Jul940ML

01-Aug930ML

02-Aug920ML

03-Aug930ML

04-Aug870ML

05-Aug880ML

06-Aug920ML

07-Aug840ML

08-Aug830ML

09-Aug880ML

10-Aug780ML

11-Aug780ML

12-Aug770ML

13-Aug770ML

14-Aug790ML

15-Aug730ML

16-Aug760ML

17-Aug730ML

18-Aug670ML

19-Aug710ML

20-Aug730ML

21-Aug630ML

22-Aug760ML

23-Aug760ML

24-Aug720ML

25-Aug770ML

26-Aug820ML

27-Aug740ML

28-Aug780ML

29-Aug850ML

30-Aug820ML

31-Aug830ML

01-Sep830ML

02-Sep780ML

03-Sep800ML

04-Sep810ML

05-Sep810ML

06-Sep790ML

07-Sep800ML

08-Sep790ML

09-Sep840ML

10-Sep810ML

11-Sep830ML

12-Sep780ML

13-Sep770ML

14-Sep830ML

15-Sep810ML

16-Sep790ML

17-Sep810ML

18-Sep750ML

19-Sep740ML

20-Sep830ML

21-Sep740ML

22-Sep800ML

23-Sep810ML

24-Sep?ML

25-Sep720ML

26-Sep720ML

27-Sep710ML

28-Sep670ML

29-Sep720ML

30-Sep650ML

01-Oct670ML

02-Oct650ML

03-Oct640ML

04-Oct590ML

05-Oct540ML

06-Oct600ML

07-Oct560ML

08-Oct540ML

09-Oct540ML

10-Oct540ML

11-Oct530ML

12-Oct510ML

13-Oct380ML

14-Oct450ML

15-Oct420ML

16-Oct450ML

17-Oct480ML

18-Oct400ML

19-Oct560ML

20-Oct520ML

21-Oct530ML

22-Oct520ML

23-Oct490ML

24-Oct510ML

25-Oct470ML

26-Oct500ML

27-Oct560ML

28-Oct440ML

29-Oct480ML

30-Oct410ML

31-Oct420ML

01-Nov470ML

02-Nov410ML

03-Nov640ML

04-Nov410ML

05-Nov430ML

06-Nov420ML

07-Nov400ML

08-Nov410ML

09-Nov470ML

10-Nov360ML

11-Nov480ML

12-Nov390ML

13-Nov490ML

14-Nov460ML

15-Nov410ML

16-Nov450ML

17-Nov460ML

18-Nov450ML

19-Nov450ML

20-Nov440ML

21-Nov390ML

22-Nov420ML

23-Nov390ML

24-Nov380ML

25-Nov380ML

26-Nov400ML

27-Nov400ML

28-Nov410ML

29-Nov400ML

30-Nov420ML

01-Dec360ML

02-Dec390ML

03-Dec370ML

04-Dec360ML

05-Dec350ML

06-Dec370ML

07-Dec350ML

08-Dec340ML

09-Dec350ML

10-Dec310ML

11-Dec330ML

12-Dec300ML

13-Dec320ML

14-Dec300ML

15-Dec270ML

16-Dec300ML

17-Dec300ML

18-Dec270ML

19-Dec280ML

20-Dec270ML

21-Dec280ML

22-Dec250ML

23-Dec270ML

How many times a day I expressed milk

My pumping routine!

10-Mar6times

11-Mar6times

12-Mar6times

13-Mar6times

14-Mar5times

15-Mar7times

16-Mar7times

17-Mar5times

18-Mar7times

19-Mar6times

20-Mar6times

21-Mar5times

22-Mar5times

23-Mar6times

24-Mar6times

25-Mar5times

26-Mar6times

27-Mar6times

28-Mar4times

29-Mar5times

30-Mar6times

31-Mar5times

01-Apr5times

02-Apr5times

03-Apr5times

04-Apr5times

05-Apr6times

06-Apr5times

07-Apr5times

08-Apr5times

09-Apr5times

10-Apr5times

11-Apr5times

12-Apr5times

13-Apr5times

14-Apr5times

15-Apr5times

16-Apr5times

17-Apr5times

18-Apr5times

19-Apr5times

20-Apr5times

21-Apr5times

22-Apr5times

23-Apr5times

24-Apr5times

25-Apr5times

26-Apr5times

27-Apr5times

28-Apr5times

29-Apr5times

30-Apr5times

01-May5times

02-May5times

03-May5times

04-May4times

05-May4times

06-May4times

07-May5times

08-May4times

09-May5times

10-May4times

11-May4times

12-May5times

13-May4times

14-May4times

15-May4times

16-May4times

17-May4times

18-May4times

19-May4times

20-May4times

21-May4times

22-May4times

23-May4times

24-May4times

25-May4times

26-May4times

27-May4times

28-May3times

29-May3times

30-May5times

31-May4times

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13-Jun5times

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19-Jun5times

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22-Jun4times

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12-Jul5times

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23-Jul5times

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26-Jul4times

27-Jul5times

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30-Jul5times

31-Jul4times

01-Aug4times

02-Aug5times

03-Aug4times

04-Aug4times

05-Aug4times

06-Aug4times

07-Aug4times

08-Aug3times

09-Aug4times

10-Aug3times

11-Aug4times

12-Aug4times

13-Aug4times

14-Aug4times

15-Aug4times

16-Aug4times

17-Aug4times

18-Aug3times

19-Aug4times

20-Aug4times

21-Aug5times

22-Aug5times

23-Aug6times

24-Aug5times

25-Aug5times

26-Aug6times

27-Aug6times

28-Aug4times

29-Aug4times

30-Aug4times

31-Aug4times

01-Sep3times

02-Sep4times

03-Sep4times

04-Sep4times

05-Sep4times

06-Sep5times

07-Sep5times

08-Sep5times

09-Sep5times

10-Sep5times

11-Sep4times

12-Sep4times

13-Sep4times

14-Sep4times

15-Sep4times

16-Sep4times

17-Sep4times

18-Sep4times

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21-Sep4times

22-Sep3times

23-Sep3times

24-Sep3times

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27-Sep3times

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30-Sep3times

01-Oct3times

02-Oct3times

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19-Oct6times

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22-Oct4times

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27-Oct3times

28-Oct4times

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03-Nov3times

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How much milk my baby drank

Milk consumption of my baby from birth to 9 months

10-Mar530ML

11-Mar575ML

12-Mar585ML

13-Mar450ML

14-Mar620ML

15-Mar580ML

16-Mar480ML

17-Mar560ML

18-Mar680ML

19-Mar470ML

20-Mar630ML

21-Mar650ML

22-Mar580ML

23-Mar620ML

24-Mar620ML

25-Mar680ML

26-Mar570ML

27-Mar560ML

28-Mar620ML

29-Mar540ML

30-Mar600ML

31-Mar540ML

01-Apr730ML

02-Apr740ML

03-Apr700ML

04-Apr750ML

05-Apr740ML

06-Apr700ML

07-Apr740ML

08-Apr820ML

09-Apr575ML

10-Apr780ML

11-Apr750ML

12-Apr880ML

13-Apr755ML

14-Apr750ML

15-Apr780ML

16-Apr830ML

17-Apr860ML

18-Apr960ML

19-Apr910ML

20-Apr910ML

21-Apr870ML

22-Apr800ML

23-Apr750ML

24-Apr940ML

25-Apr770ML

26-Apr850ML

27-Apr820ML

28-Apr850ML

29-Apr850ML

30-Apr840ML

01-May840ML

02-May890ML

03-May860ML

04-May770ML

05-May810ML

06-May800ML

07-May700ML

08-May720ML

09-May820ML

10-May830ML

11-May690ML

12-May800ML

13-May830ML

14-May860ML

15-May790ML

16-May840ML

17-May740ML

18-May790ML

19-May630ML

20-May800ML

21-May720ML

22-May730ML

23-May730ML

24-May820ML

25-May850ML

26-May690ML

27-May820ML

28-May780ML

29-May830ML

30-May790ML

31-May910ML

01-Jun900ML

02-Jun780ML

03-Jun820ML

04-Jun930ML

05-Jun720ML

06-Jun700ML

07-Jun890ML

08-Jun730ML

09-Jun820ML

10-Jun930ML

11-Jun920ML

12-Jun880ML

13-Jun790ML

14-Jun820ML

15-Jun860ML

16-Jun820ML

17-Jun800ML

18-Jun930ML

19-Jun840ML

20-Jun880ML

21-Jun730ML

22-Jun750ML

23-Jun720ML

24-Jun920ML

25-Jun960ML

26-Jun840ML

27-Jun750ML

28-Jun940ML

29-Jun730ML

30-Jun900ML

01-Jul770ML

02-Jul860ML

03-Jul840ML

04-Jul910ML

05-Jul940ML

06-Jul820ML

07-Jul840ML

08-Jul790ML

09-Jul930ML

10-Jul930ML

11-Jul810ML

12-Jul910ML

13-Jul900ML

14-Jul950ML

15-Jul880ML

16-Jul940ML

17-Jul860ML

18-Jul980ML

19-Jul960ML

20-Jul880ML

21-Jul780ML

22-Jul800ML

23-Jul880ML

24-Jul860ML

25-Jul760ML

26-Jul880ML

27-Jul660ML

28-Jul760ML

29-Jul880ML

30-Jul850ML

31-Jul790ML

01-Aug720ML

02-Aug850ML

03-Aug880ML

04-Aug770ML

05-Aug930ML

06-Aug760ML

07-Aug840ML

08-Aug820ML

09-Aug660ML

10-Aug740ML

11-Aug620ML

12-Aug600ML

13-Aug670ML

14-Aug670ML

15-Aug680ML

16-Aug560ML

17-Aug720ML

18-Aug710ML

19-Aug630ML

20-Aug710ML

21-Aug690ML

22-Aug570ML

23-Aug700ML

24-Aug640ML

25-Aug730ML

26-Aug620ML

27-Aug740ML

28-Aug710ML

29-Aug690ML

30-Aug820ML

31-Aug760ML

01-Sep710ML

02-Sep740ML

03-Sep800ML

04-Sep800ML

05-Sep720ML

06-Sep710ML

07-Sep690ML

08-Sep690ML

09-Sep690ML

10-Sep570ML

11-Sep730ML

12-Sep720ML

13-Sep700ML

14-Sep680ML

15-Sep690ML

16-Sep690ML

17-Sep680ML

18-Sep650ML

19-Sep710ML

20-Sep570ML

21-Sep560ML

22-Sep540ML

23-Sep610ML

24-Sep550ML

25-Sep580ML

26-Sep540ML

27-Sep670ML

28-Sep660ML

29-Sep600ML

30-Sep670ML

01-Oct620ML

02-Oct540ML

03-Oct450ML

04-Oct450ML

05-Oct520ML

06-Oct490ML

07-Oct510ML

08-Oct530ML

09-Oct450ML

10-Oct330ML

11-Oct550ML

12-Oct240ML

13-Oct390ML

14-Oct420ML

15-Oct410ML

16-Oct440ML

17-Oct460ML

18-Oct430ML

19-Oct300ML

20-Oct320ML

21-Oct360ML

22-Oct340ML

23-Oct330ML

24-Oct350ML

25-Oct340ML

26-Oct390ML

27-Oct410ML

28-Oct410ML

29-Oct420ML

30-Oct380ML

31-Oct420ML

01-Nov410ML

02-Nov420ML

03-Nov420ML

04-Nov300ML

05-Nov260ML

06-Nov410ML

07-Nov410ML

08-Nov350ML

09-Nov260ML

10-Nov130ML

11-Nov290ML

12-Nov170ML

13-Nov340ML

14-Nov320ML

15-Nov240ML

16-Nov410ML

17-Nov330ML

18-Nov320ML

19-Nov300ML

20-Nov360ML

21-Nov350ML

22-Nov390ML

23-Nov380ML

24-Nov390ML

25-Nov140ML

26-Nov350ML

27-Nov400ML

28-Nov400ML

29-Nov390ML

30-Nov490ML

01-Dec340ML

02-Dec400ML

03-Dec390ML

04-Dec310ML

05-Dec340ML

06-Dec300ML

07-Dec260ML

08-Dec300ML

09-Dec310ML

10-Dec290ML

11-Dec300ML

12-Dec330ML

13-Dec310ML

14-Dec270ML

15-Dec270ML

16-Dec290ML

17-Dec280ML

18-Dec260ML

19-Dec240ML

20-Dec270ML

21-Dec270ML

22-Dec260ML

23-Dec240ML

Read more about it!

Want to read more about expressing? Get in depth advice and insights into different women's experiences with expressing milk.

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    • Tnoskoguy profile image
      Author

      Terri Guy 3 years ago from Connemara, Ireland

      @Lynn Klobuchar: It's terrible that some people get so little support in breastfeeding, well done for working through it and breastfeeding 3 babies, it's great you didn't give up.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image

      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      Impressive!!!I was told by the nurse who brought my first baby in to me just minutes after his birth that he would never latch on or nurse so I should just give up. This was after 3 minutes of fumbling. I had an easy birth and was devastated, so I cannot even imagine what you went through.Both of us figured it out, however! I breast fed all three of my boys until they self weaned. It was very easy for me and I just ignored all the naysayers.How courageous and loving of you to persevere. This is a great resource for breast feeding families. Well done.

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 3 years ago

      I never had the pleasure of children nor breastfeeding, but it sure is a bit of a miracle of life! I've been watching mommy cat feeding her six little ones several times a day and I marvel at the miracle of it. I surely couldn't handle those six little ones without mommy.

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 3 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Whew, you make me even more thankful that I was able to breastfeed both of my children "normally" so I didn't have to express, supplement, or use formula at all with either of them. What a treasure of information for those who do have to express, though. I'm sure many will find it very helpful.