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20th Century Sweets

Updated on October 14, 2016
Elsie Hagley profile image

Elsie has been cooking for sixty years and has many recipes. I'm sharing some with you, some are my mothers recipes, hope you enjoy baking.

Sweet Dish - Junket

Sweets - Puddings From The Twentieth Century

These recipes are just right for the changing seasons, as they cover hot or cold desserts. In the middle twentieth century, a pudding was something that was always on the table for every mid-day meal, seven days a week, which was normal in those days. A good solid meal was meat and vegetables, followed by a pudding. In the winter it was usually a steamed, boiled or baked pudding.


How to make sponge pudding

Foundation Steamed Pudding.

  • 2 ozs butter
  • 2 tablespoon sugar
  • 6 ozs flour
  • 1 good teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch salt
  • 1 egg
  • about 2 tablespoons milk

Method:

  1. Cream butter and sugar.
  2. Sift and add the flour, baking powder, salt.
  3. Add the egg and milk and mix.
  4. 4. Steam for 1 1/2 hours to 2 hours in a buttered basin.
  5. Serve with sweet sauce. (recipe above).
  6. VARIATIONS.
  7. Raspberry Pudding. Add 1 teaspoon raspberry flavoring to creamed butter and sugar, and put a tablespoon (or desired amount) at the bottom of the basin.
  8. Or use strawberry essence and strawberry jam.
  9. Chocolate Pudding. Sift 1 tablespoon cocoa ( or desired amount), with the flour and add 1 teaspoon vanilla essence to the creamed butter and sugar. Use an extra dessertspoon milk.
  10. Coffee Pudding. Add 1 dessertspoon coffee essence (or desired amount), to creamed butter and sugar, and only 1 1/2 tablespoons milk.
  11. Spice Steamed Pudding. Add 1 dessertspoon mixed spice to sifted flour, and sprinkle a tablespoon of chopped walnuts over the bottom of the basin.

Peach Chiffon Pie

  • one cup pureed peaches
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons powdered gelatine
  • 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 eggs yolks and whites separated
  • 1/4 pint cream
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond essence
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Method:

  1. Bake pie shell. Recipe below
  2. To 1/4 cup peach puree add gelatin, and let soak.
  3. To remaining, 3/4 cup peach puree add sugar and salt and bring to boil.
  4. Stir in softened gelatine.
  5. Add carefully the well-beaten egg yolks.
  6. Cool.
  7. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites.
  8. Whip half of the cream, sweeten, flavor vanilla and almond and fold into the mixture.
  9. Pour into baked pie shell and chill until firm.
  10. Serve, with the rest of the cream (whipped) or Ice cream.
4.5 stars from 2 ratings of Peach Chiffon Pie

Three-minute microwave sponge pudding

Microwave Puddings

If you have never tried making a pudding in the microwave, watch the video above, it only took three minutes to cook it. It is so easy you can just about use any recipe for steam puddings, you will find very little failures, just imagine the sweets you could be enjoying on a cold winters night.

Have fun just try it you will be amazed.

Cranberry and Rhubard Pie

Rhubarb - Have you eaten a rhubarb pie?

My family enjoys them, only don't make it too tardy, if it is, eaten with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream breaks down the tartness. Rhubarb is a vegetable, but it can be eaten in the morning added to a cereal and evening as a pie or at the bottom of a sponge pudding.

Only the stalks of the rhubarb are used, the leaves and roots contain oxalic acid and other unknown poisons, so it is best to avoid them.

Pie Shell Pastry

  • 6 ounces of flour
  • 3 1/2 oz butter
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch salt
  • 1 oz castor sugar
  • 1 egg yolk

Method:

  1. Sift into a bowl all the dry ingredients.
  2. Rub butter lightly into flour.
  3. Add egg yoke.
  4. Work into a pliable dough.
  5. Cook in hot oven about 200c until baked about 20 minutes
  6. Suitable for cases, and open tarts, such as rhubarb, plums, apples, you can add strips of pastry over the top of the pie.

Desserts or Sweets

What do you called Desserts?

See results

How to make a Steamed Pudding with Sarah Whitaker at Aga Twyford

Peach Shortcake

These recipes are what my mother cooked in the 1950s, a good plain dessert with no fuss, and I carried on doing it in the 1960-70s.

Ingredients

  • 2 level breakfast cups flour
  • 2 level teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • pinch salt
  • 2 large tablespoons sugar
  • 3 full tablespoons butter
  • about 1/2 cup milk

Method:

  1. Sift dry ingredients, rub in the butter.
  2. Mix with the beaten egg and milk to make a soft dough.
  3. Place one-half of the dough in a greased sandwich tin, smooth over, and spread with soften butter.
  4. Cover with the other part of the dough, which has been smooth out to fit the tin.
  5. Bake in a hot oven till cooked. ( I cook it on 200 c for about 20 mins).
  6. Split open while hot.
  7. When cooled, spread with sliced peaches (ripe or stewed) and whipped cream.
  8. Replace the top on and spread sliced peaches on top and cover with more whipped cream. Strawberries are nice for a change from peaches.
  9. You can add chocolate chips or hundreds and thousand, or whatever you like on top of the whipped cream and serve.

Fruit Dessert

Fruit Sauce

  • One cup fruit juice and pulp
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 tablespoon cornflour
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup sugar - as needed
  • pinch salt
  • sprinkle nutmeg

Method:

  1. Mix fruit juices and bring to boiling point.
  2. Mix cornflour with a little cold water, and add to hot mixture.
  3. Sweeten to taste, add nutmeg and bring to the boil, stirring all the time.
  4. Serve hot with fruit or cooled on ice cream, serve on the peach flan above.

Foundation Dessert Sauce

  • 1 tablespoon cornflour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • pinch salt
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoon butter
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1 cup hot water

Method

  1. Mix cornflour, sugar, and salt.
  2. Gradually add the hot water, and cook until thick, stirring constantly.
  3. Add the beaten egg yolk, and cook a minute or two.
  4. Add butter and vanilla.
  5. Cool, a little, and fold in the beaten egg white.
  6. Serve with tinned or fresh fruit, or nice on plain steamed foundation pudding.
  7. Lemon Sauce: Omit the vanilla, add 2 tablespoons lemon juice, and 1 teaspoon grated rind.
  8. Nutmeg: Add a teaspoon grated nutmeg.
  9. Chocolate Sauce: Add 1/2 oz. unsweetened chocolate, or a dessertspoon cocoa, blend with the cornflour and sugar.

Cheese cake and fruit

© 2012 Elsie Hagley

Do you have Desserts very often?

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    • MGWriter profile image

      Marsha Caldwell 8 months ago from Western Washington State

      Hi Elsie

      You have put together a good cookbook. The pictures definitely bring attention to each recipe. I like the manner that the ingredance are displayed. Given all over image this is very professional.

    • Elsie Hagley profile image
      Author

      Elsie Hagley 24 months ago from New Zealand

      The Dirt Farmer: I recommend that basic steamed pudding recipe especially that there are seven different varieties, a different one for every day of the week and no one would ever know it was the same basic pudding.

      I used to make steam puddings for my children every day especially in the cooler months, it would help to feed my five children cheaply when meat was so expensive, just top them up with pudding and custard which in those days was cheap as we were dairy farmers and the milk came from our cows, these days we have to pay tax if we use our own milk but not in the 1960 -70s, times have changed, nothing free these days.

    • The Dirt Farmer profile image

      Jill Spencer 24 months ago from United States

      Hi Elsie. The title of this hub intrigued me. I particularly enjoyed reading your foundation pudding recipe. I have looked at steamed pudding recipes before and wondered if they're worth the trouble. What do you think? --Jill

    • Elsie Hagley profile image
      Author

      Elsie Hagley 2 years ago from New Zealand

      smine27: Come to think about it I haven't had one for a long time either. Will be looking forward to it on Christmas day. I love puddings, sweets if that's what they call it. Nice piece of christmas pudding with brandy sauce would be wonderful.

    • smine27 profile image

      Shinichi Mine 2 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      I love puddings! Haven't had one in ages.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      These look delicious. I love desserts.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Um, my mouth is watering like crazy right now, did you mean to do that? :)

    • Elsie Hagley profile image
      Author

      Elsie Hagley 4 years ago from New Zealand

      @SusanRDavis: Thank you for the visit and nice comment. Christmas greetings and all the best for 2013.

    • SusanRDavis profile image

      Susan R. Davis 4 years ago from Vancouver

      Not as much as I used to. However, I still indulge. I never thought of doing a Peach flan. It sounds delicious and I just have to remember than a flan is a custard and most fruits do well there. Maybe kiwi, too, which I love.

    • profile image

      JoshK47 4 years ago

      These sound delightful! Blessed by a SquidAngel!

    • profile image

      Funkysi 4 years ago

      Too often. I must try one of your recipe.

    • bigjara lm profile image

      bigjara lm 4 years ago

      all the time

    • TaraWojt profile image

      Tara Wojtaszek 4 years ago

      I love the idea of Peach Shortcake, I will have to try that one for sure. Thanks.

    • profile image

      anooptu 4 years ago

      like to pick these recipes for my mum

    • profile image

      poutine 4 years ago

      Unfortunately, way too often.......

    • Elsie Hagley profile image
      Author

      Elsie Hagley 4 years ago from New Zealand

      @SheilaMilne: Thanks for visiting and commenting. Yes I agree desserts these days seem to be for special occasion only. Shame!

    • SheilaMilne profile image

      SheilaMilne 4 years ago from Kent, UK

      These bring back a few memories! We rarely have a pudding (dessert) these days, only for special treats.

    • Elsie Hagley profile image
      Author

      Elsie Hagley 4 years ago from New Zealand

      @Heidi Vincent: Thanks for visiting and commenting. Yes I am a lover of dessert also. Have a nice day.

    • Heidi Vincent profile image

      Heidi Vincent 4 years ago from GRENADA

      Lovely dessert recipes! I love desserts.

    • jolou profile image

      jolou 4 years ago

      Not daily, but I do enjoy a dessert with fruit. Peach pie is one of my favorites.

    • JohnTannahill profile image

      John Tannahill 4 years ago from Somewhere in England

      Sorry, you asked a question. No, not really. I like desserts but nobody in my family really bothers. Maybe once a month or so, or when we have people over as well.

    • JohnTannahill profile image

      John Tannahill 4 years ago from Somewhere in England

      I've got a bit of a thing about retro recipes at the moment. This was good. I like the picture of the 50s desserts.

    • Camden1 profile image

      Camden1 4 years ago

      Generally just on special occasions. Tonight we're actually having strawberry shortcake because I bought too many strawberries.

    • profile image

      MyKitchen 4 years ago

      We only have desserts on special occasions, but as a child we had dessert every Sunday lunch. In summer it was often a "jelly" based dessert

    • flycatcherrr profile image

      flycatcherrr 4 years ago

      Maybe once a week or so. I'm more into the fruit-and-cheese kind of dessert, but every now and then one gets a craving for something sweet and only marginally nutritious. :)

    • LiteraryMind profile image

      Ellen Gregory 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA

      Only when I crave them. I try to cut back. But, when I have them it's usually for something really worth it. Great lens with some nostalgic recipes.

    • Bustler profile image

      Bustler 4 years ago

      Yes, it's a must.

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