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Homemade Monkey Bread

Updated on January 22, 2012

Sweet and Delicious

If you are here then you might be familiar with the Monkey Bread recipe that requires three tubes of ready made biscuits to make it. While this is incredibly convenient the regular cost is well over $10 for a treat that is overly sweet and doesn't last long.

Here is a homemade version that uses standard ingredients from your pantry and fridge. It is still sweet, it still pulls apart, and it still disappears quickly but the upside is it costs less and is made with more love.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup granulated white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 4 cups all purpose flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup margarine/butter
  • 1 1/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar

Directions

Printable Version After Guestbook

In a small deep bowl combine granulated sugar and cinnamon really well and set within reach of work station.

In an extra large bowl combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. With a pastry blender combine margarine until flour mixture is crumbly. With a large wooden spoon mix in buttermilk until just combined. Knead dough in bowl with one hand for about 10 to 15 repetitions. Don't over knead.

Lightly grease a Bundt cake pan or a fluted tube pan and have within reach of work station.

Cut dough in two and set one half aside. Roll one of the halves into a long tube. Slice it lengthwise making two long pieces. Cut into one inch bits. Roll four to five bits at a time into the sugar and cinnamon mixture then plop into cake pan. Continue in this manner until all of the dough has been coated and positioned evenly around tube in cake pan.

Melt butter and brown sugar in a small saucepan on medium-low heat. Keep stirring to prevent it from burning. When sugar has melted spoon over the one inch bits in the cake pan.

Bake at 350 degrees F for about twenty-five minutes. When done I use an oven safe dish and flip the cake onto it. I find letting it sit in the pan for more than a few minutes prevents it from coming out in one piece. Be careful, use mitts.

The monkey bread is best served warm. It can be pulled apart in pieces or cut into sections with a knife. I won't bother giving you storage recommendations because it won't be around that long.

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Prep time: 1 hour
Ready in: 1 hour
Yields: 10

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup granulated white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 4 cups all purpose flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup margarine/butter
  • 1 1/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar

Instructions

  1. In a small deep bowl combine granulated sugar and cinnamon really well and set within reach of work station.
  2. In an extra large bowl combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. With a pastry blender combine margarine until flour mixture is crumbly. With a large wooden spoon mix in buttermilk until just combined. Knead dough in bowl with one hand for about 10 to 15 repetitions. Don't over knead.
  3. Lightly grease a Bundt cake pan or a fluted tube pan and have within reach of work station.
  4. Cut dough in two and set one half aside. Roll one of the halves into a long tube. Slice it lengthwise making two long pieces. Cut into one inch bits. Roll four to five bits at a time into the sugar and cinnamon mixture then plop into cake pan. Continue in this manner until all of the dough has been coated and positioned evenly around tube in cake pan.
  5. Melt butter and brown sugar in a small saucepan on medium-low heat. Keep stirring to prevent it from burning. When sugar has melted spoon over the one inch bits in the cake pan.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees F for about twenty-five minutes. When done I use an oven safe dish and flip the cake onto it. I find letting it sit in the pan for more than a few minutes prevents it from coming out in one piece. Be careful, use mitts.
  7. The monkey bread is best served warm. It can be pulled apart in pieces or cut into sections with a knife. I won't bother giving you storage recommendations because it won't be around that long.
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    • profile image

      anonymous 

      4 years ago

      Can't wait to try your recipe!

    • sbconcepts profile image

      sbconcepts 

      5 years ago

      I can't wait to try this! It brings back memories of the Monkey Bread my Mother used to bake (no canned biscuits in her kitchen), such a delicious and heartwarming treat. Thanks for a walk down memory lane!

    • PromptWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      Moe Wood 

      5 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      @anonymous: Thanks for stopping by Foodeater, so glad you enjoyed it!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I was moving a friend on the weekend and she pulled some monkey bread out of the freezer for everyone to try, first time I'd had it. Afterwards I needed to know if I could make it myself, I used your recipe and it turned out great. I'm making it again today! Thanks for sharing!

    • Timewarp profile image

      Paul 

      5 years ago from Montreal

      I just had to click and find out what Monkey Bread was, looks delicious!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      i am making this for Christmas morning after we open present thank you so much.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Thank you for the recipe...looking forward to trying it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I am making this today for my little girls 15th birthday party. She asked for it instead of cake.... =)

    • PromptWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      Moe Wood 

      5 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      @anonymous: Awesome! Good to know, thanks!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      @anonymous: My 6 yr old daughter and I made this last week, and we used a glass 9x13 pan. It turned out perfectly, we just reduced the cooking time by a few minutes.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Is there any other pan we can use?

    • PromptWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      Moe Wood 

      6 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      @anonymous: Must be because there is one cup of brown sugar at the end of the ingredients list. :D

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      @PromptWriter: There is only a 1/2 cup of sugar and that is for the dough, am I missing something?

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      So much quicker than the old recipie...waiting for it to finish baking to taste.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      @anonymous: for every cup of milk, dairy free included, just add one TBSP of vinegar to make it a buttermilk. :)

    • PromptWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      Moe Wood 

      6 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      @anonymous: Becca, I have not tried it it but I would say it is worth a try if that is the kind of milk you use. It would be interesting to hear the results.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      Can you sub dairy free milk for the buttermilk?

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      Was looking for one with out yeast, i have used this one before it great thanks!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      thanks for the recipe, I have been searching for homemade version.

    • PromptWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      Moe Wood 

      6 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      @anonymous: You must have forgotten something. There is already a 1 1/2 cups of sugar which makes it very sweet. And with the butter it is definitely not dry.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      Sounded great but on first try was not sweet enough and a little dry. Maybe add some sugar and vanilla. Thanks for sharing. :)

    • Stazjia profile image

      Carol Fisher 

      6 years ago from Warminster, Wiltshire, UK

      What a delicious sounding recipe - I am definitely going to try it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      LOOKS VERY GOOD!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      6 years ago

      looks delicious. I'm going to bake this for my son

    • blessedmomto7 profile image

      blessedmomto7 

      6 years ago

      looks great. Wish you had a printable recipe from the lens! Blessed by a squid angel.

    • PromptWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      Moe Wood 

      7 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      @JJNW: I believe the original name of this type of bread was "Monkey Brains" because it was supposed to look like brains. And the name I guess would be attractive to children. I am also glad it is not one of the ingredients. ;)

    • JJNW profile image

      JJNW 

      7 years ago from USA

      Okay...but I am not clear on how many monkeys I need to make this...I have 2 kids... (tee hee). I am glad monkeys are not in the ingredients (oh, sick - so sorry!). In any case, this looks delicious and pretty easy (two of my fav things in a recipe). "Liked" by a Giant Squid 100 Clubber

    • bechand profile image

      bechand 

      7 years ago

      Ain't had it in years - but love it !

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      7 years ago

      This was so delicious. I made it tonight for both my mother and myself. As much fun to make as it is to eat! Not terribly sweet either like some other recipes I've seen. Also, I used Dark Brown Sugar and added extra cinnamon. It worked out so well.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      7 years ago

      thank you, have been trying to find a recipe for this that doesn't begin with "take 3 cans refrigerated biscuit dough." I've always wanted to try Monkey Bread, not something I grew up with but sounds delish.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      8 years ago

      I am making some today

    • eclecticeducati1 profile image

      eclecticeducati1 

      8 years ago

      Sounds wonderful!!! Great lens. blessed by an Angel.

    • profile image

      DongMei 

      8 years ago

      I've never heard of Monkey Bread but your title fascinated me. So glad I took a look because this sounds delicious. I shall certainly try it.

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