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How to Make Money on an Urban Farm

Updated on July 30, 2014

Let’s Get down to the Nitty Gritty

I’ve written about the joys of living on an urban farm, the feeling of accomplishment as one grows their own food, and raises animals for the same purpose. I’ve written about the connection one feels to the earth, and the connection one feels with the past. I’ve written about memories from long ago, working on my grandparents’ farm, and how wonderful it makes me feel to be a part of that tradition handed down so long ago.

All well and good, but today let’s talk about a more practical aspect of urban farming, namely making money.

SHOW ME THE MONEY! Those famous words from the movie “Jerry McGuire” are still applicable today. Times are tough. You don’t need me to tell you that, and practically everyone is interested in ways to supplement their meager incomes. Well, I’m here to show you some ways, using the land you currently have, and some good old-fashioned creativity. Growing your own food is nice; making money from that food is better. Raising your own animals is nice; making money from those animals is better. Am I right?

Take what you need and leave the rest. Some of these ideas will not be for everyone, and that’s great. I’m sure you’ll find something in this article that you can live with, so read on and happy farming.

Daily  eggs make a nice income
Daily eggs make a nice income | Source
Quail are egg-producing machines
Quail are egg-producing machines | Source

HERE CHICKY!

Check your city ordinance on this one. Where I live, we are allowed five hens and no roosters. That doesn’t seem like a lot, but those five hens provide us with four or five eggs per day, and we have a growing list of people who will pay $5 per dozen for fresh eggs. Yes, people will pay that, and they will consider it a bargain, because if you ever taste fresh, organic eggs, you will never again want store-bought eggs.

Once I get my acreage, I will have one-hundred hens. Listen, chickens are very easy to care for, and they are money-making machines. Take advantage of nature’s egg-layers and make some nice spare change.

The cost of a chick….$1. They will be laying eggs in about six months. They will lay for two, three, four or more years, day after day, week after week, month after…well, you get the point.

And if you are thinking of raising them for meat, and making money on that meat, forget about it. Chickens are a terrible investment if raised for meat, especially on the small scale of an urban farmer.

DARLING, CUTE LITTLE QUAIL

For those of you who are considering raising quail, but can’t stand the thought of killing them for meat, then consider raising them for eggs.

Quail are birds that most cities pay no attention to, and that is great news for urban farmers. They take up very little space, they are relatively quiet, and they lay eggs like crazy….and those eggs will sell for between three and six dollars a dozen, depending on the market at any given time. Today is a great time for selling organic eggs. People will pay if they know what they are buying is organic and healthy.

We currently have sixteen quail. We will be getting more. They cost $1.50 each and they will lay, on average, 1.7 eggs per day for a couple years. You do the math…say a dozen eggs each day…say five dozen per week…say four bucks per dozen….that’s twenty bucks per week, every week….nice little supplemental income.

Now, for those who have no problem butchering your own meat, consider raising those darling little birds for meat. They are absolutely delicious, they are ready for butchering after five weeks, and if you have an incubator you will have a steady supply of meat for years to come….and I promise you there are people who will pay from three to five bucks for a butchered bird. I personally think that raising quail for eggs is a much better investment.

Get rid of your lawn and grow food
Get rid of your lawn and grow food | Source

FRESH VEGGIES, ANYONE?

Understand this basic fact: you can grow enough vegetables to feed a family of four on 400 square feet. For those of you who are math-challenged, that is a plot with dimensions of 10’x40’, and practically everyone has that much room in their backyard. Of course, you might have to get rid of that lawn back there, but when was the last time that lawn made you any money?

With the growing demand for organic vegetables, you will have no problem finding friends and neighbors who will buy off the excess of your harvest. To insure that you will always have customers, try growing something that is hard to find in supermarkets. Rarity sells in any business, as long as there is a demand for that rarity.

EASTER EVERY SINGLE DAY

Yes, we are going to talk about rabbits and no, we will not talk about slaughtering them, although if you choose to do so, people will pay for it.

There are two ways to make decent money from raising rabbits, exclusive of the slaughtering thing.

One, you can raise them for their poop. No, I have not lost my mind. Yes, I said poop. Rabbit manure is nature’s super fertilizer, higher in nitrogen than any other natural fertilizer. It is not messy, it does not smell, and it can go directly from the rabbit to the garden without having to compost it first.

Price rabbit manure at the feed store and then consider selling your own. One buck and two does will produce three cubic yards of manure each year, and that manure is money in your pocket.

If poop isn’t your things, although for the life of me I can’t imagine a gardener who would not appreciate rabbit poop, then raise these little darlings for pets. Get a buck, get a couple does, and then sit back and let nature do its thing. Babies can be sold for five bucks each. Full-grown purebreds will go for twenty-five dollars or more.

And yes, they are delicious, but I promised not to speak of such things.

THOSE SQUIGGLY, PROFITABLE WORMS

I love raising things that require very little care. Hey, I’m a busy guy, and I don’t have time to invest in certain animals like horses, so I go small and invest practically zero time in creatures like worms.

What I love about worms is that they will make me money and I don’t have to do a darned thing….and….they will also feed my chickens…and…they will also make compost for me. In fact, I can’t think of a single reason why a person wouldn’t raise worms, except for that squiggly, slimy thing they have going for them.

Whether you raise meal worms or red worms, there will always be people who will pay for them, and once you start your first batch, you literally will never pay another dollar on this little money-maker.

HONEYBEE I ADORE YOU

I was going to write about raising bees, but I haven’t done it yet, so my opinion is just like so many other opinions out there…practically worthless. I can tell you, from talking to neighbors who do this, that it is a hit-and-miss proposition that can be expensive and can, during a bad year, net you absolutely nothing in earnings. However, I do know of two people who have done quite well, and make over $500 each year selling honey. The jury is still out on this one.

grapes and berries
grapes and berries | Source

DO YOU HAVE SOME HERBS, HERB?

People will pay for them, and if you make your own lotions from them, people will pay even more for them.

Remember the key word regarding foods in the year 2014….organic. People will pay for organic foods and spices and herbs, and if you have room on your property, you really need to do some research, plant some herbs, and count your cash.

BERRY, BERRY DELICIOUS

On our property, which is only 1/8 of an acre, we have raspberries, strawberries, Marionberries, blueberries, and blackberries. This year we have already harvested six gallons of berries and we are still picking.

Six gallons!

Do you know what berries are selling for in a supermarket?

You do the math. Six gallons times…….

TAXES

According to the Internal Revenue Service:

“You are in the business of farming if you cultivate, operate or manage a farm for profit, either as an owner or a tenant. A farm includes livestock, dairy, poultry, fish, fruit and truck farms. It also includes plantations, ranches, ranges and orchards.”

Check the statutes, and also check your individual state about tax deductions. You just might be surprised by the amount you can deduct from your taxes by running an urban farm.

And so Much More

Seriously, I could do another article about the other ways to make money on an urban farm, and maybe I will, but this gives you something to think about. None of it is guesswork by me. I have done everything I mentioned in this article except the bee thing, and I have made money on it all.

Every little bit helps, and it adds up to a nice, supplemental income.

And who, among you, would turn down a nice, supplemental income?

Happy farming my friends!

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • profile image

      Old Poolman 2 years ago

      I love the fresh eggs I get from my chickens, but unfortunately I have made pets out of all of them. There is no way I could either sell or kill and eat one of my pets.

      I think I would make a lousy farmer or rancher because I would want to keep every animal I raised.

      I am trying my hand at the raised bed garden you described in one of your hubs but was a little late getting it ready. Next year I hope to have plenty of fresh garden veggies for the table.

      I will give excess if any to my neighbors but will most likely never try to sell any of the goodies my garden produces.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Poolman, that garden should be in good shape soil-wise for next year. Our first attempt was a dismal failure as I recall.....and I don't see us killing any of our animals...once they have names they are here to stay my friend.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 2 years ago from New York, New York

      I know you totally know the ins and outs of urban farming and thank you tremendously always Bill for sharing your knowledge here. I usually pass these articles along to my dad, who loves to try his hand at this for more fun then money, but still thank you again. Have a wonderful Thursday now!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Janine. I know this doesn't apply to you, and that makes it more special that you took the time to comment. Have a great Thursday my dear.

    • RachaelOhalloran profile image

      Rachael O'Halloran 2 years ago from United States

      I admire you for being able to do this. It's not for everyone, and certainly not for me. I can't stand to see anything get killed, even for food. If I buy chicken packaged in the supermarket, (which along with fish is primarily what I eat, no beef) I am better off not knowing the process it went through to get there because if I did, I'd be very upset and probably be starving myself to death.

      I'm very happy being a customer, not the farmer. This was interesting to read because I didn't know half of what goes into it and I'm glad you spared the gore or I'd never eat again. :(

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rachael, we don't kill our animals. I have nothing against it, but once we name them then they are pets and that's that. :) We have a bunch of egg-layers and we are quite happy with that. :) Thanks for your visit my friend.

    • Curiad profile image

      Mark G Weller 2 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

      Great article Bill. Imagine what could happen if we put every homeless family into a house, and taught them how to do this!

    • RachaelOhalloran profile image

      Rachael O'Halloran 2 years ago from United States

      I'm so glad. When you mentioned butchering, I hate to admit it, but I kind of skipped over that part because I didn't want to get that awful picture in my mind. So I missed that part. Thanks for clarifying.

    • profile image

      dragonflycolor 2 years ago

      I think urban farming is making waves in our society. People are seeing the value it brings. Thanks, Bill!

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 2 years ago

      I tried to grow some herbs this year, but I was a total failure. I think I had better stick to writing! Up and useful (in the right hands) and always awesome.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      $5/dozen is the going rate for organic eggs. That's what my friend who owns the organic store down the road gets for them. Once my neighbors and I get our veggie garden going, we'll sell what we don't eat to her. I also want to grow herbs. Right now I have parsley growing in pots. I planted some thyme in one of my gardens but the squirrels ate them. I'll have to look into how to keep them from eating future efforts.

      Great article, Bill. I love your urban farming hubs. I learn a lot from them.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mark, if we just used the unwanted downtown properties and turned them into community gardens.....why can't it happen?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rachael, I've done it before, but I certainly don't enjoy it. I'd rather watch my little critters roam around.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I think so too, Mari. Slowly but surely it is gaining popularity. Thanks for your thoughts.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      breakfastpop, I'm sorry to hear that....rosemary is just about impossible to mess up if you feel like giving it another go. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Sha....that's what our neighbors pay us for our eggs, and I know the stores get slightly more...about $5.40 per dozen...so there is a market out there for sure.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 2 years ago

      Thanks,, billy. I'll give it a try.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Okay my friend. Have a great day breakfastpop.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      Bill, I love the fact that you raise organic eggs and are branching out into quail eggs, too. Since you are in a northern state, how does the weather factor into it? We get some pretty cold temperatures here and I lose sleep thinking about the poor things out in the cold. I have some neighbors who raise organic eggs so I guess it would work here, too. Onward to your other farming hubs.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      Superb tips here, bill! I can't imagine killing the lovely quail. The French go a bundle for them and there are always quails' eggs on the aperitif menu when celebrating. I love them for being cute little birds but I can't see what the fuss is about - too small for a couple of mouthsful and the same for the eggs, though they are better. I understand the beauty of raising them though.

      Didn't know worms could be so good (no, I don't mean for eating), wouldn't have even thought about it. That's a good one.

      You make urban farming sound such fun! Brilliant!

      Ann

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Next year we will be there. for now still just enough for us.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Peg! Our winters aren't as brutal as many northern states. Our chickens did fine last winter. On the really cold nights, we string a heating lamp out to their coop and that takes care of them. We'll do the same thing for the quail if we have to.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, we totally enjoy raising birds. They are a delight and we love the eggs. Really, killing them isn't worth it. It takes two birds to make a meal for one person, and that just isn't cost-effective...plus they are so damned cute. LOL

      Thank you for the "brilliant."

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Slow but sure wins more races, Eric. Keep plugging away my friend, and thank you.

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 2 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Just shows you what can be done in a small space, absolutely love this article! I am so jealous and would love to have that going on, particularly the berries and eggs! I could see me naming my chicks alright so would be the same mindset, now they are pets! I want to be growing my own herbs and fruit for the organic products you know I love to create so thanks my friend for showing how achievable it is.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

      We used to have Quails many years ago but never had them long enough to get the eggs and sell them, long story! lol! and I would never have thought of rabbit poop, yes of course its just as good as the other kind they use, near me on the allotment they use chicken poop and oh my, does it pong! lol! glad to see your organic farm is coming on nicely Bill, nice one!

    • Suhail and my dog profile image

      Suhail Zubaid aka Clark Kent 2 years ago from Mississauga, ON

      Very informative article, but since my municipality doesn't allow urban farming, I am getting a good idea on fusion rural/urban set up.

      The truth is urban farming is something that will enable me merge my interests - dogs, wilderness hiking and keeping farm animals. Boy o boy, if I am able to do that, my late dad will really be proud of me in the heavens.

      Layers, honey bees, and some sheep for grazing (rather than making me mow the fields) are going to be my go to combination. I am thinking of buying acreage few miles out of the city I live in, but make it a home based business. I am still thinking about how to make that happen, but your article has given me a fairly good idea.

      Thank you, Bill, as usual.

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 2 years ago

      Great ideas, Bill.

      You are a natural.

      My uncle subsidized his retirement income by raising bunnies.

      He did very well with them. He would almost sell out at Easter.

      DJ.

    • Brie Hoffman profile image

      Brie Hoffman 2 years ago from Manhattan

      Awesome article,

      I wish I'd thought of it ;)

      You can have bees in New York City..did you know that?

      Also, when I lived in Oregon I used to pick buckets of blackberries..boy that was great. I would freeze them, they freeze really well and make jams, pies, syrups..you name it. I miss those blackberries.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzie, you don't need much space at all. I don't know what you are looking at for Dublin, but if you have any space at all, you can do wonders. Best wishes, Irish.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Nell. Rabbit poop is the miracle fertilizer for gardens...once you try it you'll never use anything else.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suhail, that is a wonderful plan and I hope you are able to do it. A couple acres would give you a bounty in crops and small animals. Best wishes to you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, thank you, and I would get along very well with your uncle.

      bill

    • Brie Hoffman profile image

      Brie Hoffman 2 years ago from Manhattan

      Chicken manure is also valuable.

    • Barbara Kay profile image

      Barbara Kay Badder 2 years ago from USA

      Great ideas Bill. I sell perennial flower plants and have beautiful flower gardens at the same time.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      My dogs would agree with the value of rabbit poop. Keeps 'em grazing our backyard for hours. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brie, I did not know that about NYC, but thanks for the info. We have so many berries in our freezer, I'm not sure if we'll eat them all...but we have friends who will gladly take care of that problem for us. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It is indeed, Brie. Not as good as rabbit poop, and a bit more messy, but good stuff for gardens.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Barbara, we have a neighbor who does that and makes very good money. Thanks for mentioning that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Heidi, dogs most definitely love rabbit poop...not sure why but it seems to be a delicacy for them. :)

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 2 years ago

      FYI - My friend's daughter is a veterinarian and she warned about dogs eating bunny poop. It may have been

      a virus. Sorry, I don't quite remember what the danger was. You might want to ask your dog's vet if there is

      any danger.

      DJ.

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 2 years ago from Orange, Texas

      Every time I read one of your articles on urban farming, it makes me want to move out of this trailer part that much more! lol We do have a kid's swimming pool that we plant veges in every year, and a few tomato plants growing in the ground, but other than that, the park takes a dim view of gardens. I really miss the land we used to have.

      Wonder what the trailer park would think of chickens? lol We might get by with rabbits on the back side of our trailer but I'm not crazy about raising rabbits. I've been there and done that. What turned me off was them eating their young - yuck! Apparently, you have to keep track of when they are due and feed them bacon before they have them. This is according to an expert I knew (a little old lady) who raised show rabbits. I guess it works, because her babies never got ate. Oh what the heck, maybe I'll try raising rabbits. The worse thing that could happen is the landlord tells us to get rid of them. We've been here going on 4 years. I can't imagine them throwing us out because of a few rabbits.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I will, DJ...thank you.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I do know that they will eat their young...a rather disgusting habit if you ask me. LOL I wish you had land of your own...I don't tink I would last long in a trailer park, but we do what we have to do, right? Thank you.

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 2 years ago from Orange, Texas

      Yes, we do, Bill. But I am blessed in that I have good neighbors and the ones across the street from me are into raising plants, trees and flowers. Not very productive as far as eating is concerned, but their yard is beautiful and I love looking at it. They raise all kinds of flowers that attract birds and hummingbirds, so we share birdfeeders - the birds in our park have plenty to eat and drink. lol

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 2 years ago from Hudson, FL

      I think you might have some luck visiting locally-owned restaurants, too. Selling locally grown food is a selling point, and the more upscale ones might even be interested in the quail eggs.

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 2 years ago from Iowa

      I sold a bunch of my leftover tomato seedlings at my sister's garage sale last year for $1 each (I probably could have got more for them but I just wanted them to go to good homes). I also know a guy and his son who started a little online business selling sunflower seeds they saved from their garden. So selling seedlings and seeds are more ways to make money with your urban (or in my case, suburban) farm.

    • ologsinquito profile image

      ologsinquito 2 years ago from USA

      This is a great article. The signs are there. We need to become more self sufficient. It's amazing how much food you can grow with a very small plot. Plus, there are a number of creative ways you can stretch existing growing space. Voted up and shared.

    • Homeplace Series profile image

      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Another time I'm happy to be retired. I get tired, just thinking about trying to "make money" from my efforts. Best wishes! ;-)

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 2 years ago

      I'm so glad that you are enjoying your little farm. One-eighth acre doesn't sound like enough land to put a house on, much less a garden and chickens. You are correct about raising chickens for the meat, at least in Arkansas. Tyson put all the small-chicken farmers out of business. We wouldn't think of trying to raise them to sell here. Now, eggs are a different story. I saw a local story on TV recently that said the city of Little Rock allowed chickens, turkeys, and something else that I can't remember. I believe it was ducks, but I know it wasn't peacocks. Anyway, congratulations on your success, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That's nice, Ann. I love a beautiful yard and especially love watching birds.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You might be right, Lizzy, and I just might give that a try. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for mentioning that, Deb, and you are right of course.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I had three chicks laying and then got two more like a dummy four months ago and now those babies are in with the big girls and laying! 5 eggs a day! (well from the 5 chicks I mean not the 2 babies) I really am not into it for the profit but that is 150 eggs a month so I will start selling to help pay for the food. I have given mine so much range to graze but they still eat a good bit of food. How much do you feed yours? I think on the bag it says feed 2 lbs a day each and I sure don't give them that much but most people who see them think they are pretty big chickens! They are spoiled I know and beautiful! I love your chicken hubs! lol

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you olgosinquito...and i totally agree of course.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, you had me laughing that time....I'm not sure when retirement will happen for me, but it's something to at least think about.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you MizB....and no way would I have peacocks. Beautiful to look at but my God they are loud. Give me a barking dog any old day. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, there is no way we feed ours that much. We supplement their food by putting maybe two cups per day in their dish....we feed them table scraps...they love bread and apples....and they find the rest of their food.....and 150 eggs per month is great!

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 2 years ago from Florida

      You make me miss my life in the country! I used to have backyard chickens and really enjoyed them. Loved getting those fresh eggs every day.

      A friend of mine raised earth worms and sold them for a long time. Another friend is now trying her hand at keeping bees.

      Voted this UP and shared.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

      My son Jack used to raise rabbits and did quite well with them, plus he loved the taste, me, NO WAY would i eat a little bunny. I can live with the veggie garden and berries though. Bill i think you are a natural born farmer. Good luck with all you attempt to do.....

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mary! There is something very satisfying and soothing about having chickens around...and now we have an aviary with quail and that is exciting as well.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, it must be in my blood. I love working with the soil and raising animals...very satisfying undertaking for me.

      Thank you my friend.

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Bill - Wonderful Hub as always. You ares o good at building enthusiasm and encouraging people. As I think I said many months ago. It is a gift to be an exhorter/encourager. So glad that you share who you are and all that you do with the rest of us. :) Theresa

    • tirelesstraveler profile image

      Judy Specht 2 years ago from California

      Most excellent ideas. Do you do your own butchering?

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Farmer/Author Bill,

      You have a lot going on there! It is all so interesting indeed. I remember growing up and picking tons of blackberries growing in the wild behind our home, before they built up the neighborhood ...

      I know I could handle the herbs and would love berries right now. I had no idea there is money in selling worms, but it makes a lot of sense. In addition, I had no clue about the rabbit poo being so great! My brother has honey bees. Well, had honey bees. When they left, they did not find their way back and at that time everyone thought it was due to the cellphone signals making them lose their way.

      I learned a lot reading here this day. Thank you so much for sharing and may God bless you in all of your endeavors and new adventures.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

      i admire folks who riase all types of animals.. I don't think I could do it.. because I get attached.. so killing it for food wouldn't sit right.... at a dollar a chic.. the possibilites of having fresh eggs.. endless thanks for sharing Billy :) FRank

    • imtii profile image

      Imtiaz Ahmed 2 years ago from Dhaka, Bangladesh

      The country were I live is massively dependent on Farming. But most young generations here don't want to work at the farms. The come to the city and make it crowded and search for jobs. If they don't find jobs they lie down all day. I think this article might help the people who are unemployed.

    • Suzanne Day profile image

      Suzanne Day 2 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

      An interesting hub as you got straight to the point about where the money is in a mini hobby at home farm! I also like that they are small investments to begin with, plus you get the benefit of enjoying nature around you instead of dreading the lawn mowing all the time. Voted useful!

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 2 years ago from Wales

      Having spent much of my childhood on the farm with my grandmother it is certainly still in my blood but not the raising animals for their meat part of it .You have covered the subject wonderfully and even though I doubt if I will have a smallholding I the very near future it doesn't stop me from reading about it all. However we do grow Gooseberries, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Potatoes and Green beans in containers. They are for our own use and how wonderful to be able to enjoy our own delicious harvest. Thanks again for another great hub Billy and here's to the next 500,000 views on here. Congratulations my dear friend and so well deserved.

      Eddy.

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      Chitrangada Sharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Urban farming is a great idea, not only for the money but for the joy of it. In addition you get everything fresh.

      Great suggestions! Thanks!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Theresa, that is a lovely thing for you to say...thank you so much. I was raised this way, and I'm happy I was.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      tirelesstraveler, thank you...if we do butcher yes, we do it.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, I just love doing these things. I'll never make a lot of money doing them, but I gain a great deal of satisfaction in doing them, and that is much more important.

      Have a wonderful weekend my friend, and blessings always

      bill

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Frank, butchering them is not what we try to do...eggs and selling chicks....that I can do with no problem at all. Thanks for your visit my friend and enjoy your weekend.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for sharing that, imtii....farming is a way of life that is decreasing, and I find that sad. There is great satisfaction in working the soil and raising animals.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Suzanne. One more year and there will be no lawn, and then we'll have a celebration. :)

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eddy, thank you. I love it here at HP. The people I have met and become friends with....invaluable and a wonderful gift for sure.

      Have a wonderful weekend my dear friend.

      billy

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      ChitrangadaSharan, exactly. Fresh, safe food...emphasis on safe. :)

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      Victor W. Kwok 2 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for sharing another great article, Bill!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you again vkwok!

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      Bill De Giulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

      Great hub Bill. You are well on your way to being self-sufficient. It really goes to show everyone that there are unconventional ways to feed ourselves and to make ends meet. BTW, my two raised gardens are doing well, getting ready to pick our first eggplant and the tomatoes and peppers are growing quickly. Have a great weekend.

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      ocfireflies 2 years ago from North Carolina

      Bill,

      Around here for the longest time, folks raised chickens. Certain times of the year, I can remember smelling them and UGH! But the chicken houses were big business. Those young people who grew up having to work in these buildings had to be really tough in order to endure the heat, the smell, etc... I like your idea the best. Use a small space to supplement one's income. Typically, there are lots of berries to pick, but there have not been as many this year. Some of those who know much more than me say it is because of the type of weather we have had. Think of me when you are eating those berries come winter. Smiles.

      Kim

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, I think that is so great. Now you can add on next year with confidence my friend. Thanks for the visit and enjoy your weekend.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kim, if I had as many chickens as I want, they would be free-range. I could never coop them up in cages in a building. Quality of life is important to me...even for chickens. As for berries, this is our best year ever, and I have no idea why other than the weather. I will enjoy them and think of you. :)

    • carrie Lee Night profile image

      Kept private 2 years ago from Northeast United States

      Awesome food for thought :). I never thought about an urban farm, sounds like almost anyone can do it. Thank you for sharing :) Voted awesome!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for sharing some great tips and some very useful information, Bill. Urban farming is a wonderful pursuit.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Always a helpful hub from you with well-focused ideas.

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      Suzette Walker 2 years ago from Taos, NM

      Fantastic hub, Bill. You really have a steady stream of money coming in now with your urban farm. I am so impressed, having read and watched (through your photos) how you have built this urban farm. I wondered what you would do with the quails - I didn't think about selling the eggs they lay. I have never had a quail egg so I don't know how they taste. I think having hens laying your own eggs is a great way to save money and a great way to make money by selling them. I know how much berries you can net from picking berries from other people's gardens and picking them in the wild. Our neighbor across the street from where I grew up in Ohio breeded and raised rabbits and made good money to help support his family of ten kids! LOL! Yes, I know they eventually went to the slaughterhouse, but he never let his kids get close or connected to the rabbits, in fact they weren't allowed to go near them until they were grown adults. That's my problem, I would see the chickens, rabbits and quail as pets instead of a money making project. LOL! I have enjoyed reading this urban farm hubs and hearing about all your experiences with the 'animals.'

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true, Carrie. We love ours and we are constantly adding to it. The only problem is avoiding the poop. LOL

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Alicia. We are greatly enjoying it.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Suzette. I actually think we can make good supplemental income without slaughtering the animals and birds. That's our hope, anyway, because Bev is just like those kids you mentioned....once they are named they will live a long life. LOL

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 2 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Your hubs are always filled with practical ideas that are useful and this one is no different Bill. Unfortunately, I have no backyard to do this thing.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Unfortunately indeed, Rajan, but I appreciate you taking the time to read it. Thank you my friend.

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      Dianna Mendez 2 years ago

      PBS could not have made a better story on this topic! You make me want to take up farming in my back yard. Some day!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Some day soon, Dianna, I hope...best wishes my friend. I know you will enjoy it.

    • Jeannieinabottle profile image

      Jeannie InABottle 2 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      I did not even realize you could keep quail and they laid that many eggs that people would pay to eat. I learn something new everyday! Thanks, Bill!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jeannie, I'm a fountain of useless information. LOL Thanks for stopping by.

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      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      The beauty of farming is in the good food and health benefits that it brings. It amazes me that I have always felt so good, and can just keep on going like the Everready Bunny. Nothing is better than that. If one can make a few bucks on the side, that is the icing on the cake!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true, Deb! I am healthy as a horse and have been for decades, and I don't think it is by accident. Thanks for your thoughts.

    • Nancy Owens profile image

      Nancy Owens 2 years ago from USA

      Great ideas... not only do we save money by consuming what we grow, there are unique ways to create supplemental income streams. Thank you for sharing this.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It's my pleasure, Nancy. I hope to encourage others to give it a try. Thank you.

    • Frischy profile image

      Frischy 2 years ago from Kentucky, USA

      I have only farmed for my family, and not for profit. I have sold a few eggs to a couple of friends. Maybe I need to rethink this. Maybe I need a business license to do this in the city though. Might be worth it.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Frishcy, I think it depends on the city. Our city really doesn't care as long as things don't get out of hand...we have a business license because we plan on growing this business. :) Thanks for the visit.

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