ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to Select and Cook Crab

Updated on July 28, 2009

A Dungeness crab is not your ordinary crab. In order to better understand this statement, therefore, you must give this crab a try. A great place to appreciate this delicacy is in San Francisco by the famous Fisherman's Wharf.  Dungeness crab season here, opens on November 15th, a greatly anticipated event for both locals and foreigners. While words cannot describe flavors as well as taste buds may, it may be an understatement to describe Dungeness crabs to be simply sweet and succulent.

Dungeness crabs are native to the Pacific Coast. They may be found from the Pribilof Islands in Alaska to Santa Barbara, California. Their name derives from the former town of Dungeness once found in the Washington State peninsula where these delicacies where first commercially harvested. Typically, a Dungeness crab will weigh between one and four pounds. Only male crabs are harvested; females are returned to the sea to allow them to reproduce. 

The best season to purchase Dungess crabs in the United States is during their peak harvesting season which is in the winter. However, in Alaska the peak harvesting months are in the summer, therefore making Dungeness crabs an almost year long delicacy. Dungeness craba may be found sold raw, cooked, cracked, portioned and frozen.

In order to choose a good Dungess crab one must head towards a fresh fish market. The best way to choose wisely is to check for liveliness. A well known saying in the crab world is ''If it ain't kicking, it ain't worth cooking'' Listless crabs should be discarded because their meat tends to be mushy and with a bitter after taste. Look for a healthy violet-purplish tint on the back and a creamy colored abdomen. Discard crabs with black spots or with the presence of barnacles on the shells, this is sign that the crab is perishing. A good tasting Dungeness crab must also have a hard shell that weighs more than expected.

Upon selecting a cooked crab, one must avoid the ones with a black discoloration at the leg joints because this often means that the crab has not been cooked enuogh. A well cooked crab will have the legs tightly curled against the body indicating it was cooked alive.  Avoid any cooked crab with loosened legs.

When brought fresh from a fish market often the fishmonger will take care of cleaning the crab for you and portioning it. A fresh crab should ideally be cooked the same day. The crab should be boiled for approximately 10 minutes in salted water or steamed for approximately 15-18 minutes. Spices may be added to the water. If the crab is bought already cooked, it just needs reheated. A five minute dip in boiling water will usually suffix.

Once cooked, Dungeness crabs may be enjoyed simply with some melted butter or with a cocktail sauce. So at this point, get your taste buds ready to celebrate, grab a crab cracker and a fork, and enjoy this great delicacy of the Pacific coast.


Prepworks by Progressive Ceramic Butter Warmer Set, Fondue Warmer, 2 Tea Lights Included, Chrome Wire Stands, Dishwasher Safe - Set of 2
Prepworks by Progressive Ceramic Butter Warmer Set, Fondue Warmer, 2 Tea Lights Included, Chrome Wire Stands, Dishwasher Safe - Set of 2

Ceramic is the material of choice for over-the-candle warming because it holds in the heat without letting the flame burn your butter or damage the delicate texture of your sauce. These petite, white his-and-her pots hold about 3/4 cup of your favorite dip. Dainty wire stands suspend the pots at an appropriate distance from the tea light. Serves dinner or dessert fondue with panache. --Carol Gnojewski

 

How to Crack crab

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Treasured Pasts profile image

      Treasured Pasts 

      8 years ago from Commerce, Texas

      This will be one of the major reasons that we will retire on the coast of Oregon! That and clams! Do you know how to cook a goeduck!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)