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How to cook a flat iron steak

Updated on December 3, 2008

Flat iron marbling!

www.damarsfarms.com
www.damarsfarms.com

Best value steak...

The flat iron steak is a relative newcomer in the butchers counter, and it wasn't until a few years ago at a university of Nebraska program looking at undervalued cuts of meat that anyone even realized the potential this cut of meat had!

The flat iron steak comes from the blade roast of the beef shoulder or chuck. There is a thick and ornery looking piece of connective tissue that runs smack dab through the center of it, and this connective tissue was the very reason that nobody had ever really tried to market it as a steak. But once this piece of connective tissue is removed, researchers found that there was a steak almost as tender as a tenderloin laying underneath, and with the great beefy taste of a rib steak.

The best part though is the price, and because this steak is removed from the chuck, which is pretty much the cheapest area of beef, flat iron steaks are incredibly affordable, and retail for a few bucks a pound.

The flat iron steak will most often be sold already trimmed, but if you do see a flat iron steak (sometimes labeled a top blade steak) with the gnarly looking connective tissue still attached, you'll need to first use a chef's knife to pry/cut it out, or better yet, ask your butcher to do it for you.

Once the connective tissue has been removed, you have a tender piece of meat with incredible marbling. This steak can be cooked as you'd cook any other premium steak, and works very well on the grill, pan seared in cast iron, and if your broiler gets hot enough, steak house style under the broiler.

Butchers and cooks often recommend marinating the flat iron, and it absorbs flavors beautifully, but it's also great on its own and has rich beefy flavor in every tender bite. The beef also does very well as a fajita steak, and sliced across the grain is every bit as flavorful as skirt (the fajita favorite) and far more tender…and even a fair bit cheaper!

Get a flat iron steak for next to nothing while you still can! Restaurants love this steak for two reasons, firstly, it really does taste great, and secondly, because it's so cheap the profit margins on it are incredible!

You might have to make a special request from your butcher, because as each cow only has a couple of steaks on it, there is rarely enough for display in the meat counter fridge.

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      Laurie 6 years ago

      I thought this was great information! I'm glad I got lucky buying this steak. Cook this steak as any other. I would just put the cooking info at bottom of page sort of as the climax of his interesting piece, then you wouldn't get so many complaints

    • profile image

      mh 6 years ago

      I totally agree with all of the above I think they should or some one should change the title

    • profile image

      fix your title 6 years ago

      I agree.. Great article, MISLEADING title.

    • profile image

      C.Rex 7 years ago

      Marinate for 2 hrs and let meat get to room temp. Grill on high 6 minutes per side. Slice against the grain. Great for Fajitas. Tender!

    • profile image

      kandy v 7 years ago

      yes it was told how to cook. like any other steak in a broiler or cast iron.

    • profile image

      master1990 7 years ago

      This has nothing to do with how to cook a flat iron. I'm happy to know that what I'm about to eat will taste good, but that doesn't help me make it.

    • profile image

      einalem82 7 years ago

      I agree w/ ZR. This article was helpful though. I had no clue what 'flat iron steak' meant until I read this. Thanks! But, I still need to know how to cook it.

    • profile image

      ZR 7 years ago

      This is a great description of the steak, but a poor title. Your article does not tell one "How to cook a flat iron steak".

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