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Lotus Root Chips - A Quick and Quirky Party Snack

Updated on March 16, 2015
These loopy looking lotus root chips are a crunchy, delicious, healthy snack.
These loopy looking lotus root chips are a crunchy, delicious, healthy snack. | Source

Lotus root chips can be the conversation cornerstone at your next gala. Call them zombie chips and serve with monkey guts/guacamole at Halloween. Call them Mayan munchies and they become an End of the World party snack. Potato chip sized slices of lotus root sauted to a golden brown are sprinkled with sesame seed seasoning for a quick, quirky and flavorful snack. The loopy looking lotus rizome is healthy for you too.

Peel lotus roots and chop off the raggedy ends then slice into 1/8 inch/2.5 cm slices.
Peel lotus roots and chop off the raggedy ends then slice into 1/8 inch/2.5 cm slices. | Source

Ingredients

  • 4 cups lotus root tubers, peeled and sliced
  • 5 cups water/ with a few splashes of vinegar, boiling
  • 1/4 cup peanut oil, sesame oil or olive oil
  • too taste furikake (or other asian) sesame seasoning, sprinkled
Lotus root sliced and fried in olive oil over medium heat.
Lotus root sliced and fried in olive oil over medium heat. | Source
Furikake is a japanese sesame seasoning found in the asian food aisle of your supermarket.
Furikake is a japanese sesame seasoning found in the asian food aisle of your supermarket. | Source

Instructions

  1. Heat 5 cups of water with a few splashes of vinegar to boiling
  2. Peel lotus root, chop off the raggedy ends and slice to desired thinness. 1/8 inch or 2.5 mm makes a crisp chip.
  3. Add lotus root chips to boiling vinegar water and simmer one minute, then remove from heat. This keeps the root from turning brown.
  4. Heat oil of choice in pan until a drop of water sizzles.
  5. Drain lotus chips and pat with paper or cloth towels to remove water.
  6. Sauté lotus chips in oil until golden.
  7. Cook chips in batches, so there is space between each chip.
  8. Drain each batch of lotus chips on paper towels and pat dry with paper towels.
  9. Remove to serving dish, sprinkle furikake seasoning on top to taste, and serve.

Cook Time

Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 5 min
Ready in: 15 min
Yields: Serves 4 people a few handfuls.
3.2 stars from 5 ratings of Lotus Root Chips

Lotus Root

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1/2 cup or 60 g
Calories 40
Calories from Fat0
% Daily Value *
Fat 0 g
Saturated fat 0 g
Unsaturated fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 10 g3%
Sugar 0 g
Fiber 2 g8%
Protein 1 g2%
Cholesterol 0 mg
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.
Lotus roots can be found at asian markets.
Lotus roots can be found at asian markets. | Source

Sautéd Lotus Root Chips - Mostly Good for You

Lotus root is very high in vitamin C and high in dietary fiber, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, thiamin, and vitamin B6. It has no sugar,fat or cholesterol in its raw form. Not so good, lotus root is very high is sodium and adding furikake adds even more.

Furikake consists of sesame seed, salt, sugar and seaweed in that order. Sauteing in oil adds fat, but it tastes better that way. Sauted lotus chips are much healthier than potato chips and a whole lot more interesting. Cook some up, call them buffalo chips and bring them to a Thanksgiving pot luck.


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    • YogaKat profile image
      Author

      YogaKat 3 years ago from Oahu Hawaii

      Thanks Stessily for the sunflower/ safflower information - I amgoing to try.

    • YogaKat profile image
      Author

      YogaKat 3 years ago from Oahu Hawaii

      Thanks for your visit Neda . . . and thank you Lorena for your cm - mm edit.

    • profile image

      Neda 3 years ago

      This was very informative! Very well written! Thoroughly enjoyed this article!!

    • profile image

      stessily 4 years ago

      YogaKat, Mmm, thank you for the reminder of vinegar splashing! Normally I splash vinegar and balsamic vinegar on just about everything, but somehow I'm too caught up with the impending pleasures of consuming lotus roots to remember vinegar. I won't forget now. Excellent oil choices! I also love frying with sunflower or safflower oil because they're such gentle flavor enhancers.

      Superb recipe. Thank you for highlighting this rhizome, almost too pretty to eat.

      Appreciatively, Stessily

    • YogaKat profile image
      Author

      YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii

      Thanks for your comment ChitrangadaSharan . . . hope you enjoy lotus root chips.

    • YogaKat profile image
      Author

      YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii

      Thanks for you v

    • YogaKat profile image
      Author

      YogaKat 4 years ago from Oahu Hawaii

      Thanks for your visit ThomasPen. I found my lotus root at Foodland . . . go figure! We have a large asian population on Oahu, so maybe the consumer demand is strong.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      I do make lotus root as a recipe, but never tried it this way. Thanks for sharing this delicious recipe.

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 4 years ago from San Francisco

      I can see one problem. They're kind of pretty. :-) Thank you

    • ThompsonPen profile image

      Nicola Thompson 4 years ago from Bellingham, WA

      Yummy! I've actually just discovered lotus root for the first time a few months ago, and completely fell in love with them! But I can't find them anywhere! I came across them at an up-scale Chinese restaurant, and I can't find the delicious root elsewhere :(