ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Grilled Mexican Street Corn (Elotes)

Updated on June 12, 2018

How to Make Elotes?

Mexican Street Corn on the Cob

Traditionally corn is something we make on the side, boiling up a few ears and finishing up with butter, salt, and pepper. It's delicious, no doubt, but this makes it so much more! The flavors are vast and different, taking the sweetness of the corn, sourness and tang of lime, spice of chili powder, and the tangy somewhat bitter taste of parmesan. It pairs well with almost any grilled or Mexican dish. Plus it is absolutely beautiful and really fun to make and eat! My version is not the classic way of making it, being that I don't particularly like mayonnaise, which is typically used. But it's absolutely delicious and I hope you enjoy it! You will need the following:

What is Similar to Cotija Cheese?

  • 8 Ears of Corn, Unshucked
  • 2 Limes
  • 1 Cup Parmesan Cheese, Grated
  • 2 Tablespoons Chili Powder
  • 1 Stick Butter, Softened
  • 3 oz Cream Cheese, Softened

How to Shuck Corn

How Do You Shuck Corn on the Cob?

Start by peeling back the husks of the corn, being careful not to tear them off. They should peel back and sit, exposing the corn and the corn hair. You will be resealing the corn in their husks soon so they can cook on the grill without drying out or burning. The husks will also keep our ingredients from burning off or melting away into your grill. Once the husks are peeled back, do your best to remove as much of the corn hair as you can. I find the best way to do this is to wring the corn with your hands until all the hair is removed. Once this step is completed you can begin to flavor your corn.

How Do You Make Mexican Elotes?

Now that your corn is all clean and ready to be coated, it's time to get our flavors going! In a bowl mix your butter, cream cheese, chili powder, and a bit of lime zest into a bowl. Thoroughly mix them together until they are well incorporated. Using a rubber grill brush, or a spoon if that's all you have, evenly coat each ear of corn entirely around. Once each ear is coated, rewrap the corn with their husks so none of the yellow corn is showing. Now that they're safely nestled up in their husks, it's time for the grill!

How Long Does it Take to Grill Corn?

Do You Have to Soak Corn Before You Grill It?

Grilling the corn is the easiest part of this entire process. Heat your grill on high heat, and place the corn so that they husks are still covering all parts of the corn. If you can't cover a particular spot for some reason, don't worry. As long as most of the corn is covered it will be fine. Grill the corn, rotating every so often, for a total of about 10-12 minutes. When the husks of the corn are all blackened and burnt, you should be good to go. Remove the burnt husks, they should just fall off, and plate your corn. Be careful! These will be extremely hot!

Grilled Elotes

What Kind of Cheese Do You Use on Mexican Corn?

Now that our corn has been coated in buttery, cheesy, chili powdered goodness, it's time to finish up the flavoring and the presentation! Take the Parmesan cheese and sprinkle it over the grilled corn, rotating as you go so that it sticks to all sides. Once the ears of corn are all well coated, take one of your limes and squeeze the juice over the top of all the pieces. Leave your second lime cut into quarters for anyone who would want more later, or use them as a garnish! Sprinkle a bit more chili powder on top for color and you're finished! You can also garnish these with cilantro, green onion, or more lime zest if you want to add a bit of green color to them to make them pop! Give the corn a minute or two to cool down so you don't get burnt lips, and dig in!

What are the Uses of Corn Cobs?

Are Corn Cobs Edible?

Now that you've enjoyed the delicious corn, you'll most certainly have a load of corn cobs left over. You, like me, probably will just throw them away, but before you do here are a few things you could do with them otherwise! They aren't edible, but if you chop the cobs up small, they work great for composting! Just make sure to cut them up because the inner core is very tough and can take awhile to break down otherwise. Another interesting thing I found was making a corn stock! If you take three or four of your cobs and shave them down clean, you can use them for stock. Just take the cobs and throw them into a pot of water, salt heavily, and boil until the kitchen smells like corn. Strain the water into a jar and you can corn stock available to add that great flavor to any dish. And if all else fails, it's never too late to make a corn cob pipe!

Questions, Comments, or Criticisms?

Let me know in the comments below what you think this would pair well with, or any praise or criticism of the dish! I look forward to reading and responding to any questions as well! Also, please be sure to keep an eye out for any new recipes I post or pair with this dish! And as always, keep eating good!

How was it?!

5 stars from 2 ratings of Grilled Mexican Street Corn

© 2017 Jesse Unk

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • JesseUnk profile imageAUTHOR

      Jesse Unk 

      12 months ago from Ohio

      Nick,

      Thanks for the advice! I'll definitely try that out! Is cojita the way they prepared it in Mexico?

      Dan,

      I'm glad I could spice things up a bit for you! Are there any other farm classics you grew up on that might need some extra flair? Thanks for following!!!

    • JesseUnk profile imageAUTHOR

      Jesse Unk 

      12 months ago from Ohio

      Ryan,

      Glad to see you're still checking out my recipes! You should give me a follow to keep up with everything coming next! Also, I'd love to know what meal you prepared this with. I hope you enjoy it!

      Thanks,

      Jesse

    • JesseUnk profile imageAUTHOR

      Jesse Unk 

      12 months ago from Ohio

      Peggy,

      I appreciate you sharing my post! I'm sure your mother would have enjoyed this very much! Maybe make it for your family and let me know how it goes?

      Thanks,

      Jesse

    • Cre8tor profile image

      Dan Robbins 

      12 months ago from Ohio

      Growing up on a farm where butter, salt, and pepper were all you added to your corn, I'm excited to spruce it up a bit next time. YUM!

    • profile image

      Nick Mancuso 

      12 months ago

      Gotta go to the Mexican market and get Cotija cheese instead of parm. Parm is good, but the cotija adds an extra bite with the mixture of the chili powder and lime. I've had this in Mexico and it's still one of my favorite dishes ever.

    • Fullerman5000 profile image

      Ryan Fuller 

      12 months ago from Louisiana, USA

      I love corn on the cob. Never really thought to expand the universe of flavor with corn on the cob but I will give this a try. It looks amazing and very flavorful. I will have to think of a great delicious dish to combine it with. Thank you for sharing this. I will give it a try.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      12 months ago from Houston, Texas

      This looks and sounds so delicious! When my mother was alive she could make an entire meal out of corn on the cob. I'll bet that she would have loved eating this version. Pinning this to my vegetables board. Thanks for sharing your recipe with us.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)