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Gluten-Free Moroccan Style Tagine

Updated on March 4, 2014

Moroccan Red Snapper

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Moroccan style tagine with Red Snapper

This is a Moroccan cooking vessel, called a tagine. Mine is used for decoration. It's too pretty to cook in!
This is a Moroccan cooking vessel, called a tagine. Mine is used for decoration. It's too pretty to cook in! | Source
This fish turned out flaky, moist, and well seasoned. Spectacular!
This fish turned out flaky, moist, and well seasoned. Spectacular! | Source
This fish was caught and hand fileted (by a plastic surgeon no less!) and carried all the way from Florida to my home in a cooler on a plane.
This fish was caught and hand fileted (by a plastic surgeon no less!) and carried all the way from Florida to my home in a cooler on a plane. | Source
I was told snapper can be "fishy" but this fish was nothing but fresh ocean breeze!
I was told snapper can be "fishy" but this fish was nothing but fresh ocean breeze! | Source
Sauting the spices until they are fragrant is the secret to deep rich flavors in this dish
Sauting the spices until they are fragrant is the secret to deep rich flavors in this dish | Source
I love sun-dried tomato paste. It comes in a tube so the perfect amount is always on hand.
I love sun-dried tomato paste. It comes in a tube so the perfect amount is always on hand. | Source
I know you wish you could smell this, it's just so amazing!
I know you wish you could smell this, it's just so amazing! | Source
Just add the uncooked couscous
Just add the uncooked couscous | Source
The fish just float on top and steam cook as the couscous cooks. Don't you just love only washing one pot?
The fish just float on top and steam cook as the couscous cooks. Don't you just love only washing one pot? | Source
Cooked to perfection!
Cooked to perfection! | Source
A squirt of lemon brightens everything up.
A squirt of lemon brightens everything up. | Source
This is a good view of the tagine part.
This is a good view of the tagine part. | Source
So fresh, flaky, and delicious. Thanks to my friends in Florida!
So fresh, flaky, and delicious. Thanks to my friends in Florida! | Source

Morroccan Red Snapper

Prep time: 30 min
Cook time: 10 min
Ready in: 40 min
Yields: 4-6 people or more depending on the filets

Moroccan Red Snapper

  • 2-8 (depends on filet size) fish filets, any mild white fish will do
  • 1/2 to 1 cup milk, to soak fish
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 6-8 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons coriander, ground
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric, ground
  • 2 tablespoons ginger, freshly grated
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ground
  • 1 teaspon lemon pepper, dried
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 each bay leaf, whole
  • 1 teaspoon salt, more or less to taste
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon paprika, to sprinkle on fish
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, to sprinkle on fish
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 6 small red potatoes, diced small
  • 1/2 cup frozen peas, defrosted
  • 1 can chickpeas, drained
  • 1 lemon cut in wedges
  • 3 tablespoons sun-dried tomato paste, or regular tomato paste

Moroccan Tagine with Red Snapper

  1. If you are using frozen fish let it defrost overnight in the refriderator. Start by soaking your fish in enough milk to just cover the fish. Soak in the refrigerator while preparing the other ingredients.
  2. In a large pan, heat the olive oil and saute the onions and garlic for four to six minutes. Add all the spices and the tomato paste, except for the freshly grated ginger, and saute another two to three minutes until the spices are extremely fragrant.
  3. Add the vegetable broth, ginger, chopped potatoes, peas and chickpeas. Simmer all these ingredients for 20-30 minutes. Check the potatoes for doneness.
  4. If the potatoes are cooked through, add the couscous and stir. Take the fish out of the milk and sprinkle with the paprika. Gently lay it right on top of the stew. Simmer with the lid on for 10 minutes. Take a fork to the fish, it should flake nicely and be white all the way through. Take the fish out and plate it. Sprinkle with parsley. At this point the couscous should be ready but test for doneness. If it's done, ladle near or on top of the fish. Serve with a lemon wedge and enjoy!

Moroccan Style Tagine with Red Snapper

I have a friend who owns a house both here in the Midwest and in Florida, traveling back back and forth all year long. She loves to bring to me random food items, just to see what I will come up with. Before the Red Snapper, she brought me pecan dust. I have created a recipe for cookies with pecan dust--but that will be another blog. This trip she brought back snapper. I could see her poor husband sitting on the plane with this big cooler of frozen fish on his lap! Of course it will probably fit in the overhead compartment but picturing him sitting with it the entire plane trip just makes me giggle! He dearly loves his wife and cheerfully complies to her requests!

My first thought when she brought it to me was , this is so cool! Who else gets such a wonderful treat all cleaned and prepped, by a surgeon no less! My next thought was my husband is so not so much a fan of fish. He will eat sushi grade tuna and the the list drops off dramatically after that. I figured that I will have to come up with something so darn yummy, he will happily eat the fish.

One of my most flavorful dishes is a tagine. My first experience with Moroccan food was in Paris with my husband and while sitting next to a real honest to goodness rocket scientist. That's a whole another story in itself! When I returned home I created a vegetable tagine that I would like to think rivals the one I had in Paris, minus the rocket scientist, of course! This would be the spices that my husband would gobble up, but what to do with the fish? As you can see from the photos and recipe , I figured it out! It turned out amazing and my husband actually asked for more fish!

When creating this recipe yourself there are two things I would like to point out to you. The first is my girlfriend who brought me the fish suggested I soak it in milk to help with any fishy flavors. It did not need it. It was the cleaniest smelling piece of fish I have ever worked with. I did it anyway as to eliminate anything that would turn my husband off. The next is the amount of black pepper. I have listed both lemon pepper and black pepper, This combination gives it a very zippy, peppery bite which my husband and I both enjoyed. But you may not like this "zip" so don't overdo the the pepper. One last thought. This recipe makes an awesome tagine or stew without the fish. The dish is so named because it is traditionally cooked in the ground all day in a tagine. The tagine is in the first photo. I hope you love this very flavorful dish. It will transport you all the way to Morocco!


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    • MindbodyandFood4u profile image
      Author

      MindbodyandFood4u 3 years ago from Ohio

      I created this recipe without the fish first and it is fabulous that way. All the great spices are good for your joints too! Enjoy!

    • tonymead60 profile image

      Tony Mead 3 years ago from Yorkshire

      Nice hub, well illustrated, enjoyed the read.

      I love using my tangine which cooks everything really well, especially the slow and low things shin beef and the tougher cuts.

      voted up

      regards

      Tony

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