ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Food and Cooking»
  • Farms & Farming

The Urban Farmer Handbook: Getting Started

Updated on August 21, 2014

First a Definition

For those who are a bit confused by the term “Urban Farming,” I think it’s only fair and prudent that I give you a definition to work with. For the purpose of this article, urban farming is:

the practice of cultivating, processing, and distributing food in or around a village, town, or city.

There is nothing new about this practice. It has been around since ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, but we have seen a resurgence of it lately because of poor economic conditions. More and more people are looking at their available resources and finding new ways to make those resources work for them.

Urban farming is tied directly to sustainable living, a catch-phrase that refers to the following:

“Sustainable living is fundamentally the application of sustainability to lifestyle choice and decisions. One conception of sustainable living expresses what it means in triple-bottom-line terms as meeting present ecological, societal, and economical needs without compromising these factors for future generations.”

In practical terms, an urban farmer uses the resources he/she has at their disposal, to provide for them and their family.

Let me give you an example. Other than aesthetics, what good is a lawn? There is no practical reason to have a lawn. You can’t eat it, so why have it? An urban farmer looks at that lawn and sees row upon row of carrots and tomatoes. An urban farmer looks at those azaleas along the side of the house and sees blueberry bushes. An urban farmer sees that 200 square foot patch of weeds and sees a chicken coop.

Let me walk you through the process we used when we first started, and then we can discuss some specifics.

It all began with an herb hill
It all began with an herb hill | Source
We then added raised beds
We then added raised beds | Source

My Own Experience

Four years ago my wife and I decided to embark on a new journey without even leaving our home. We decided to start raising our own food and making our yard work for us instead of us working for our yard.

We started with a typical ranch-style home in the city of Olympia, Washington, a home situated on a large lot…about 1/8 of an acre….front yard with lawn and bordering bushes, back yard with lawn and existing raspberry bushes. We started small that first spring and planted an herb hill atop an old rotting cherry tree stump.

The next year we really got serious. We built six raised vegetable beds and dug out another 15x30 bed for potatoes. We planted carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, lettuce, pumpkins, beans and peas. We also divided our back yard using a wooden pallet fence, and prepared for the day we would start raising chickens. Three berry bushes were added to the front yard. Our urban farm was taking shape.

Year Three saw the addition of chickens for fresh, healthy eggs, three more raised beds for vegetables, rain barrels to collect water, two fruit trees, three grape plantings, more berries and of course, a compositing pile.

And here we are in Year Four with a new quail run (again for fresh eggs), more berries, more vegetables, and more fruit trees. I am currently working on a rabbit hutch, a worm bin, and we will add miniature goats next year.

And You Can Do It Too

Fact: 400 square feet of vegetable garden can feed a family of four for one year.

Fact: Organic fruits, vegetables, eggs, and meat are infinitely healthier than any store-bought, genetically-altered swill.

Fact: An organic urban farm does no damage to the environment. It does not waste resources like the caring for a lawn does, and it does not pollute the soil and water because there are no pesticides used.

The only two reasons we were able to do all of this while others haven’t is because we were willing to do it, and we live in a community that encourages urban farming.

So, how about you? Do you have the space and the desire?

If so, then let’s get started.

We then learned how to compost to prepare and amend the soil
We then learned how to compost to prepare and amend the soil | Source

LET THE SUN SHINE

Quite possibly the most important factor in having a successful vegetable garden is the amount of sunshine that garden receives during the growing months. Planning a year in advance is helpful. In preparation, you can study the sunshine for a summer so you know where maximum sunshine falls. Most vegetables need a minimum of six hours of sunshine per day; eight would be delicious; ten fabulous.

SOIL PREPARATION

Once you have decided upon the location of your garden, start preparing the soil a year in advance. Get yourself a Ph kit and test your soil. Add compost to the soil during the winter. There are few things more discouraging than planting a vegetable garden and then getting midget crops for your trouble.

Then we brought in chickens
Then we brought in chickens | Source

START SMALL AND BUILD FROM THERE

Using our example, we began with six herbs on a hill. That gave us a chance to dip our toes into the water and warm up to the activity. We added on with each year that followed. I would suggest you do the same. Start with a few raised beds and get the hang of it all before you tackle 400 square feet.

DIVERSIFICATION IS THE KEY TO ABUNDANCE

Vegetables, fruit, berries, herbs, eggs, and even meat….all of those are available on our urban farm, and, if regulations permit, they can be on yours as well. We have pretty much maxed-out our back yard, so now we are moving to the front in a full-tilt boogie. The lawn will be gone in two years, replaced with more berries and fruit trees. An arbor and trellis are in place for future growth. Our goal is to make our front yard as bountiful as the back, and we should achieve that within two years.

We freeze berries, and we are learning canning. What we have in excess we trade with neighbors for their excess. We estimate that our urban farm could easily feed ten people for a year and we plan on increasing that output.

and berries
and berries | Source
and quail
and quail | Source

LOCAL REGULATIONS

This is a true stumbling block for many. I mentioned we have six chickens, but there are many communities that will not allow chickens. We also have fourteen quail but again, check the local zoning laws to find out what you are allowed to raise. We live in an urban farming Shangrila, but not everyone is so lucky.

ONE OTHER NOTE ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY

We strongly believe in leaving as small a footprint on the environment as possible. That is why we reuse and recycle religiously. I do not buy new lumber for my projects. I used recycled lumber I found on the side of the road, and I also used wooden pallets, which to an urban farmer are like gold.

I am always looking on Craigslist for people giving away stuff I could use on our farm. Why do I need new fence posts when used will suffice? Why do I need new bricks if I can find a great deal after a building is torn down? Why buy a composter when I can make one using household items?

Will you give it a try?

See results

The Bottom Line

Anyone can do what we have done if they are willing. I constantly wonder why people eat foods tainted with GMOs when they know they are poison. I constantly wonder why people buy vegetables at the store when they could grow their own. I’m blown away by the number of people who have lush, green lawns….but then, maybe I’m just a little bit different.

If you want what we have you can have it.

Get out there and start planning today.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Most definitely, adevwriting. I've seen pictures of it happening and I know there are articles that discuss it.

    • adevwriting profile image

      Arun Dev 2 years ago from United Countries of the World

      This is really helpful!

      Can urban farming also be implemented on rooftops?

      Thanks! Voted up

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Anne, and you are so right...getting kids involved early, and seeing them eat what you grew...that is special indeed.

    • Anne Harrison profile image

      Anne Harrison 2 years ago from Australia

      Great hub, and belated congratulations on HOTD. I spent last weekend learning to split wood, planting fruit rees and putting in fences - depsite the effort involved it was apeaceful, almost meditative experience. There is nothing more satisfyong than watching the kids go outside to pick things for their school lunches. Voted up

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Lori. I'm not into eating it but I love growing it. LOL Good news for our neighbors.

    • profile image

      lambservant 2 years ago

      Congrats on hub of the day Bill. This is a great how to hub. I am not into gardening, I have a black thumb, and not much motivation. But I love being around others who do. This is a good read.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      wheelinallover, I know soil is the number one problem for those who can't grow anything...with good soil about all you can hope for are potatoes, which seem to be able to grow anywhere. Thanks for sharing your experience.

    • wheelinallover profile image

      Dennis Thorgesen 2 years ago from Central United States

      I spent part of my younger years gardening. My wife loved to work in the garden. Every year spring and fall it was my job to take care of the garden area.

      Things grown were home canned and I helped with that also. She did most of the weeding and picking. My father was still gardening when he was 77 years old. I probably would if anything would grow on my property. As it stands I eat the eatable (weeds). One of the things I don't understand is why wild celery and eatable weeds will grow while nothing else will. I do know there is a lot of compacted area around the house. Trees won't take hold anywhere other than right next to the house.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      And Dianna, I can't wait to hear about you doing it. Thank you and have a wonderful weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Vellur! I love our urban farm and the feeling of independence it gives me.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 2 years ago

      Shangrila is such a peaceful state of mind and body. I can't wait to do this in the near future.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 2 years ago from Dubai

      Congratulations on the HOTD!! Urban farming is a great idea and you are a true inspiration for people to start urban farming. It would be great to eat what we have grown right at home! Great hub, voted up.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, I never thought about seaweed. What a great idea. Now you have me thinking about this winter and seaweed. Just what i need is another project. LOL Thanks my friend.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      This is wise advice. I grew up with the same mentality, as my father was ahead of his time. He walked to the shore with burlap bags for seaweed, which was placed in the dirt after the growing season was over. That, couple with manure, created the most remarkable dirt that you will ever see. When I returned home for three years after my father died, I could literally watch plants grow in the garden, as the soil was so rich. The worms were huge, which proved the health of the dirt. A little prep is all it takes, turn it over in the spring after a year or two, then plant. If I can get Oklahoma dirt fertile, you can get yours to work for you, too.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      travel_man, it seems most of the world is way ahead of the United States in that respect. Hopefully we will catch up here soon. Thanks for stopping by.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...thank you Faith. Now what do I have to try to attain, eh?

      You are a blessing. Thank you!

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Kathryn! I love that you remember that story. I think I would as well. Now that I'm living a story like that, I love it. Such a peaceful place our backyard is. You should come and visit sometime. :)

    • travel_man1971 profile image

      Ireno Alcala 2 years ago from Bicol, Philippines

      Wow!HOTD is truly suited for you, Sir Bill! Congrats!

      Urban Farming is also a must here in the Philippines, since most cities still have spaces to be cultivated. It's not only for food sustainability but also for air clean-up and beautification.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

      Look at you!!! Getting a HOTD ... of all things : ) I am so proud of you for just being you and always writing great hubs. This is long overdue and well-deserved, dear Bill.

      I am so glad I signed-off on my laptop tonight, as I usually do not sign off, and that is when I saw you now have a HOTD!

      Hallelujah

      Big (((HUGS))) coming your way

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 2 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      First of all, congrats on HOTD. You deserve it more than most do!

      What a great topic for an article. It I fascinating to hear how you did it, and to hear the tips you have supplied.

      When I was a kid I loved a picture book about a man who went out to the woods and ended up coming home with meat, fruit, and honey from his own land. I think he came upon some of it by accident, but it still struck me as cool that someone could provide their family a meal without going to the grocery store.

      Thanks for sharing this with us. I hope to be able to do some of this someday.

      ~ Kathryn

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      techygran, thank you so much. Every little bit helps, and I do see a large change in the way people are thinking about this "grow your own food" idea. One little step at a time my friend.

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 2 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      Dear Billybuc-- this is a lovely, succinct "go-to-it" hub on a topic that really turns my sod! I'm currently staying at my son's/daughter-in-law's where my d-i-l has a thriving little urban farm-- on a VERY small property. She is from a culture that encourages growing your own food, and a farmgal at that. I'm really amazed at her ventures (splitting up the chive bedding plant, for example, so that now she has enough organic chives to sell to the local health food stores if she chooses). My husband and I do some rather pathetic gardening on our large yard-- it is to be expanded and more closely nurtured, and articles like yours are a great influence in that regard. Thank you! Sharing and voting up!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Tammy!!!!!! So good to see you. I sure hope you are well my friend. Thank you so much for stopping by to say hi, and your congratulations mean a lot to me.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ky, every little bit helps in my opinion. The fewer lawns we have in this country, the happier I'll be. :) Thanks for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Iris, that is very cool indeed. I love hearing things like that. Gives me hope that more and more people are coming to understand the importance of urban farming and sustainable living. And tiny house on wheels...our dream. :) Thanks for sharing.

    • tammyswallow profile image

      Tammy 2 years ago from North Carolina

      With the never ending rollercoaster ride on this economy, I think we would all be better off to learn how to live off the land. Excellent hub and glad to see this as hub of the day. Congratulations!!!!

    • Ky Cardinal profile image

      Ky Cardinal 2 years ago from Louisville, Ky

      A great idea and terrific article. This year we put wildflowers in our raised bed due to a vacation. I love the beds, but don't know if I want my whole backyard that way. We have several gardeners in the family and we do get other fresh vegetables. I will have to think about this. Maybe I should put of the yard in succulents? We have a postage stamp backyard. Still catching rainwater, etc., will work for all of us.

    • Iris Draak profile image

      Cristen Iris 2 years ago from Boise, Idaho

      That is my idea of heaven. That and a tiny home on wheels (working toward that). We currently live in a condo and have room for one gorgeous but stingy tomato plant. Having said that, my husband keeps bringing home lovely cucumbers and tomatoes from work. Not extras from co-worker's gardens. No, this place of business has a garden for its employees on premises. Twice a week someone comes and cares for the garden and picks the produce. The bounty is left in the break room for all employees to take of freely. How cool is that?! That's a company that gets it!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Gods Provision, bravo to you. I love what you are doing with what you have to work with. What surprises me, a bit, is that more people aren't doing this. It just makes good sense to me.

      Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you PS. This one was a complete surprise.

      angels heading back atcha

      bill

    • Gods Provision profile image

      Jeremy n Michelle 2 years ago from Texas

      I didn't know that about the 400 sq ft garden. We have 1,000 sq ft, so it's good to know that it should feed my family of 9. We have a suburban mini farm. Our ducks hatched 7 duckings and we are expecting about 15 more in a couple of weeks. It will be interesting to know that our meat is coming from animals we actually hatched and raised. We love relying on God for our provisions. Mini-farming is quite a life style.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      Congratulations on HOTD, Bill ....awesome :D :D :D

      Once again Angels are headed your way...ps

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Indeed, ecogranny. :)

    • ecogranny profile image

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      Indeed

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      ecogranny, I find that amazing. It's not the entire state of Iowa because I know a Hubber who raises them in her backyard there, but even one city is a bit silly in Iowa if you ask me.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sally, that is so sweet of you. Thank you very much. I guess HP just felt sorry for me, having never won one. :)

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you swilliams. I appreciate your visit and kind words.

    • ecogranny profile image

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      No backyard chickens anywhere in Iowa, one of the premier farming states? I suppose that's to satisfy the factory chicken corporations I hope local-food-movement folks in Iowa are organizing to change that.

    • sallybea profile image

      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      Oh WOW Billy - Hub of the Day - how nice is that!

      I am delighted for you and not before time too. Perhaps you will have another surprise in your mailbox when the votes are counted.

      Congratulations Billy no-one deserves it more than you do.

      Sally

    • swilliams profile image

      Emunah La Paz 2 years ago from Arizona

      Great Hub Billybuc! you provided a lot of useful information. Thanks for sharing and congrats on HOTD! Voted up and tweeted out!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      So do I, Sarah, and thanks for sharing your experience. It just doesn't seem right that chickens aren't allowed anywhere in Iowa. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You betcha, Mari!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thelma, that would be hard. Once I plant a garden I don't trust it in anyone else's care. LOL Thanks for the kind words my friend.

    • Sarah Switalski profile image

      Sarah Switalski 2 years ago from Iowa

      Very helpful! We started our backyard garden last year with a small box. Expanded a bit this year and have plans to expand more next year! We can't have chickens but we do buy from a local farmer. I really love being able to grow our own food.

    • profile image

      dragonflycolor 2 years ago

      LOL. I will do that, Bill. Thanks!

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

      Congratulations on the HOTD! This is a very good, informative and inspiring hub that I have read about having a farm garden. I have only a little place of land in my front and back yard and I have planted some fruits and veggies there. The sad thing is, I have to leave the garden for a few months every year and leave it to the care of my family in the Philippines.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks, Marlene. We ended up with so many veggies we had to give some away...not that we felt bad about that. :)

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 2 years ago from Northern California, USA

      I absolutely love my little "farm". Going out to pick a fresh salad is so rewarding. By the way, congratulations on receiving Hub of the Day!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Yes it is Miebakagh57. Thank you!

    • Miebakagh57 profile image

      Miebakagh Fiberesima 2 years ago from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA.

      That is true in most cases.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hey, Rhonda, thanks. As far as the chicken coop is concerned, we have six in a simple coop we built out of pallets....it is barely big enough for them....one pallet for each of the walls, plywood on the floor and the top....three nesting boxes. You don't need a nesting box for each chicken because they always use each other's anyway. Oh, and plywood on the outside to keep the critters from breaking in. Then we cut a door in the plywood in the front and put it on hinges...very simple...pallets were free...two sheets of plywood and hinges, and that is it.

    • Rhonda Lytle profile image

      Rhonda Lytle 2 years ago from Deep in the heart of Dixie

      My goodness! You have been one busy beaver. We just built a pen and put in two beds this summer after just moving here. It's a lot of work! It looks like you are doing a fantastic job from the pictures. I'd really be interested to hear you thoughts on the best chicken coop designs for about a dozen to have a home. This is so beyond awesome!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I had none, Au fait, and thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mari, if I were you, I'd sit down with that daughter of yours and take notes. :) I love our urban farm...I love walking through it, looking at it, smelling it....all of it.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you ChitrangadaSharan...very much appreciated.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Susan, you are sweet. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Flourish. That was kind of you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you justthemessenger, and I love the chicken joke. LOL A live turkey in Chicago? Who would have thought it possible? I love that story.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Jaye! I appreciate your kind words my friend.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Audrey, I was in shock. This is the last thing I expected to find in my inbox this morning. Way too funny my friend, but thank you.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      If you didn't already have one or two, then you certainly were overdue. Well deserved!

    • profile image

      dragonflycolor 2 years ago

      I think as I get older, I realize the importance of having a small garden. I am learning a lot from my sister in law who is such a pro. This year, I have benefited from some pepper plants and a basil plant. I have also planted flowers in my flower beds to give some color. I did have a fabulous pumpkin plant but the evil squash bug prevailed! Right now, my 9 year old daughter is showing me up by growing 3 apples trees from seed. She's so clever!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

      I came back to say Congratulations for a well deserved HOTD! Very happy for you!

    • Susan Zutautas profile image

      Susan Zutautas 2 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Came back to say CONGRATULATIONS!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      I'm back to say congratulations on HOTD!

    • justthemessenger profile image

      James C Moore 2 years ago from The Great Midwest

      Here's a riddle:What do you call one of Billybuc's chickens who swears a lot? Answer- FOWL MOUTHED! Seriously though, I appreciate the information. I actually purchased a live turkey from a shop in the inner city Chicago neighborhood of Ukrainian Village. This happened 20 + years ago, before the current urban farming resurgence. Apparently some among us have always kept up this tradition.

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 2 years ago from Deep South, USA

      Congratulations, Bill! This hub is so very worthy of HOTD, and it's gratifying to see that fact noted by the HP team. Your article is like a concise manual of how to go about urban farming, and I've shared it as such.

      Voted Up++++

      Jaye

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 2 years ago from California

      Woo Hoo HOTD!!!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That's great, Nancy. A good sized bed for sure, and I love that you always have herbs near the kitchen. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and the kind words.

    • Nancy Owens profile image

      Nancy Owens 2 years ago from USA

      Congrats on Hub of the Day! My raised bed is 8 by 34, and then I tuck stuff by the back door like garlic, thyme, chives, parsley, etc so it is handy for cooking.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Mary. Yes, I think it's about time, too. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Miebakagh...best wishes to you.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 2 years ago from New York

      Had to come back and say congrats on HOD! Its about time.

    • Miebakagh57 profile image

      Miebakagh Fiberesima 2 years ago from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA.

      Good story, but I do not have a land or I would farm my favorite herbs, fruits and vegetables and raise some hens too.

      Have a good day hubbing!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I hope so, Anna. Thank you for your support and belief in me.

      bill

    • Anna Haven profile image

      Anna Haven 2 years ago from Scotland

      Absolutely. Without dreams, we have no hope. Without hope we have nothing.

      Keep dreaming Bill and one day, I believe for you it will come true. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you cheeluarv...I was shocked to see it. LOL

    • cheeluarv profile image

      cheeluarv 2 years ago from INDIA

      Very informative, excellent hub on urban farming. Very happy to see your article has been selected as a HOTD. Well deserving award. Congrats.:)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Stephanie, thank you so much. I really appreciate you saying that at a sad time like this. My sympathies to you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Scott, thank you! It was a long road to get here. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I know, Paula, I really need to pull my head out of my *%^#...well, you know. :)

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      I love your urban farm! For many years, we raised all of our own vegetables and even sold part of our crop at a local Farmer's Market. There is nothing more satisfying than providing healthy food for yourself and your family. Unfortunately, our current lifestyle prevents us from going at it full tilt like you do, but we still love our crop of tomatoes, squash, cukes and beans. Your article was so encouraging to people who want to live healthier...and more frugally!

      Congratulations on your Hub of the Day! It's well deserved!

    • profile image

      Scott A McCray 2 years ago

      Congrats on a well-deserved HOTD!

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 2 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      LOL.......bro, was that a tiny bit tongue-in-cheek comment about finding time to fit something MORE into your C R A Z Y schedule?? Point well taken! LOL.....and btw, how about volunteering with Little league, marching on Washington & working at the local Soup Kitchen......? C'mon bill, move it! LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Susan. There's a joke about the HOTD. I wrote a funny article a couple weeks ago about never having won the HOTD after 800 articles...and now, darn it, I won it. LOL

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 2 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Wow, I love to read an article where the author is truly passionate about his topic and this one certainly fills the bill! You've given us a lot to think about and act upon. Congratulations on the well-deserved HOTD honors!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL....Sis, I'm almost pissed I won this. I'm sure you'll understand that. Thank you, though....it's nice to finally win this damned thing.

      As for the magazines, you are right. I need to figure out a schedule that allows me to query magazines while doing twenty other things.

      Have a great day, Sis.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Dora...very much appreciated my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vicki, I think HP gave me one to shut me up. LOL Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I know, Barbara...darn it! LOL Now I'll have to start a new record. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Peg. I didn't think I would ever win one of these, and hooray to you for starting the planning stage for your garden.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Anna, you are so kind. That is my dream, a writer's retreat. One day maybe. We should all have dreams, right?

      You are very kind, Anna.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much, John. I am shocked that I finally won a HOTD.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Julie and it's good to see you again. I hope you are well and happy.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Linda! I finally cracked the code and won one. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Jan and you are right, this is different for me, but I believe in the urban garden movement, so thought it was worth writing.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My Bell, I hope you are able to do it. We started very small, but it just seemed to take on a life of its own.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Robin! It is a work load having a big garden, so I understand.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, this is a first after 825 articles. Thank you, and I am with you...ban all lawns!!!!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Suzette. Ours looks like a jungle right now, but we love it.