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Can It!

Updated on November 9, 2014

Can It Simple and Delicious

While we all love fresh fruits and vegetables, the sheer volume of the local bounty can be a bit overwhelming in the summer.

The farm markets are overflowing with piles of colorful peppers and tomatoes, peaches and plums. Our gardens are producing bumper crops of carrots, beets, cucumber and squash. Bargains abound, so it's the perfect time to pickle a peck of peppers or put up those juicy peaches to enjoy in the months ahead.

What Happens In Canning?

There's no special magic to canning. Fruits, vegetables, or meats are packed into canning jars, which are fitted with self-sealing lids and then heated. Sustained high heat kills dangerous organisms that could cause food spoilage in the jars; it also causes the gases in the food and in the jars to expand, driving out most of the air left inside. Hot jams, jellies, and other preserves are cooked first and then packed, hot, into hot jars.

When a jar cools, the vacuum created inside pulls the lid down against the jar mouth to make a tight seal. Unless the seal is broken, none of the organisms that cause spoilage can enter.

Cuisinart CSB-77 Smart Stick Hand Blender with Whisk and Chopper Attachments
Cuisinart CSB-77 Smart Stick Hand Blender with Whisk and Chopper Attachments

This gadget makes canning much easier.

~ 200-watt immersion hand blender housed in brushed stainless steel

~ Powerful chopper and whisk attachments provide added versatility

~ Lightweight design; easy-to-grip ergonomic handle; simple push-button control

~ 16-ounce mixing/measuring beaker and 2-cup mixing container included

~ Measures 2-1/8 by 2-3/5 by 14 inches; 3-year limited warranty

 

Make Canning Easier

It is very important to use the right equipment when you are canning; everything from the jars to the right kettle is crucial.

HINT: If you're a beginner and are starting out with nothing, consider sharing equipment expenses with a friend. You can take turns canning or - better still - can together.

Something To Cut Your Prep Time In Half

Chopping everything by hand isn't an option on my canning days. Now that I have my handy Cuisinart chopper I spend less time in the kitchen, get my canning done faster and have less mess to clean up.

Measurements are marked on the beaker that is included. This find this invaluable!

I love my Cuisinart!!


Have you?

Have you ever canned?

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Norpro 600 Jar Lifter
Norpro 600 Jar Lifter

~ Cushion coated, improves grip, reduces breakage.

~ Specially designed to lift jars from top or side.

 

Another Essential You Will Need

You may already have this item, if not, I recommend you purchase it.

Potholders just won't do. For safety sake please get it before you start canning.

It's possible to preserve almost any fruit or vegetable for future use, but some take to canning better than others.

For low-acid foods or things like garden peas, roasted bell peppers, corn and fresh berries, freezing may be the best process for preservation.

Think about canned fruits, pickled cucumber or beans, canned tomatoes or tomato sauces and salsa, and any kind of relish or chutney that uses plenty of sugar or vinegar in the mix. Then make sure to start with the finest fresh ingredients you can find.

This is not the time to salvage bruised apples or moldy blueberries. The "garbage in, garbage out" adage applies when it comes to canning, and in the interest of food safety, it's always smart to start with clean, ripe and unblemished produce.

That said, it is possible to create a silk purse with your canning kettle, even if you are stuck with green tomatoes or a mountain of oversized zucchini.

I Use The Open Kettle Method

Safe tomatoes if you follow these directions!

Safety is crucial in canning. In general, there are three methods of canning - open kettle canning, the water bath method and the steam pressure method. In later lenses, detailed step-by-step canning directions will be given for vegetables, meat and fish, as well as for jam, jelly, and pickles.

Here I will be showing you how my great-grandmother, grandmother , mother, myself and now my daughter (5 generations) have canned our tomatoes. Not with the hot water method as recommended by most but using the open kettle method.

By using this method the ingredients have a better chance of melding and certainly taste better than when using the other method.

Step #1

~ Get out the stock pot, jars (discard any that have nicks or cracks), lids (they must be new), ring bands, and other items listed under "Equipment Needed."

~ Be sure all equipment is clean and ready to use.

~ Scald lids in boiling water: keep in very hot water until time to use.

~ Scald jars and place upside down on a clean towel.

Step #2

~ Fill a medium sized pot with water and bring to a boil.

For tomatoes follow my directions below, prepare only enough for one canner load at a time. (7 quarts)

~ Use only ripe/sound tomato, onions and zuchinni and use fresh parsley.

~ Wash and prepare the fruit and vegetables.

~ Chop onion into very small pieces. (I use a stick hand blender making this a no-tears job.)

~ Peel and chop zucchini into small cubes.

~ Chop parsley until very fine. (Basil and oregano may also be added.)

~ Place these three ingredients into your stock pot with a small amount of water and simmer for appoximately 10 minutes or until the zucchini turns transparent. Be careful not to let it burn.

Now for the tomatoes

~ Score tomatoes on the bottom or prick with a fork.

~ Dip tomatoes in hot, hot water. (I usually start out with the water boiling.) Leave in hot water until skins start to pull away from the fruit. (Approx. 1 minute)

~ Take out of the water with a slotted spoon (If you have a blanching basket, all the better).

~ Immerse tomatoes in cold water and then place in the colander to drain.

~ Remove core and skins and chop into large chunks. (I use the seeds also.)

~ Place tomatoes into pot with onions, etc. and stirring it, bring it all to a boil.

~ Lower temp. and allow to simmer until tomatoes are cooked.

~ Salt it to taste.

When all is cooked keep it hot, HOT!

~ Boil lids for 5 minutes.

~ Place all your jars and rings near the stove.

~ Use a small pot to carry the jar up to the rim of the stock pot to fill.

~ Fill the jar with boiling hot tomatoes, leaving 1/4-inch head space.

~ Run a narrow spatula (or a table knife) gently around the jar between the food and jar sides to release any bubbles: add more liquid if necessary.

~ Wipe jar rim with a damp cloth or damp paper towel to remove any food particles that might prevent a seal.

~ Lift a jar lid from the boiling hot water and place it on jar. Screw ring band on by hand; tight but not overtighten. This is tricky at first ... but you'll get it right in no time.

~ Place full jar on a clean towel, out of a draft and let it cool.

~ Repeat with remaining jars.

Shhh, Listen :

You'll hear the wonderful "POP" as each jar seals. Music to the ears!

**Many thanks to Will Borden's Galleries

for taking the photos for this lens.

Adjust For Altitude

Adjust for every 1,000 feet above sea level that you live to kill off spoilers:

~Sterilizing jars: Boil for 10 minutes, plus 1 min.

~Processing in boiling water for 20 min or less: Increase by 1 min.

~Processing in boiling water for 20 min or more: Increase by 2 min.

Canning Tomatoes Using The Hot Water Bath Method. - Canning Tomatoes, Tomato Sauce & Salsa

Here's another method used to can tomato sauce and salsa, plus instructions on how to can whole or crushed tomatoes. The video podcasts are to be used with detailed instructions and recipes on CanningUSA.COM The video teaches how to home-can delicious, ripe and red summer tomatoes whole, diced or in your favorite tomato sauce!

I don't mind leaving the seeds in.

The Hot Water Bath Process

Method Used in the above video.

Heat-processing is the most important part of successful home canning - boiling jars of prepared food for specific times to ensure that a vacuum is created to properly seal the contents inside, and kill microorganisms that can cause spoilage. This is what makes canned food shelf stable at room temperature for months, and even years. (I do have a cool storage room for my canning though.)

It's also vital to follow up-to-date published recipes to the letter. Without the right amount of sugar or acidity in the mixture, you risk dangerous spoilage, and even deadly botulism. So don't be tempted to cut back on the sugar or vinegar, or try to bottle meats or fish at home. Stick to the recipes and follow the processing guidelines.

Fill the jars, leaving 1\4-inch headspace, then wipe the rims clean, top jars with snap lids and screw bands tight.

To process and seal the contents, the jars are lowered into a deep kettle of rapidly boiling water (deep enough to submerge the tops by an inch or two), set on a rack and boiled (processed) for the time specified in the recipe.

Make sure to use the same size of jars that the recipe specifies - changing the jar size changes the processing time.

A good canning book, like "Canning Freezing & Drying - A Sunset Book" is essential.

Canning, Freezing & Drying
Canning, Freezing & Drying

A good all-around book for new and seasoned food preservers. If I only had one canning book, this would be it!

 

My Recommendation - The Best of the Best

I bought this book new many years ago and have used it so much that it is now in tatters. I was so pleased to find it still available and at a bargain price. This book has some of the most unusual and delicious recipes for jam, jelly, preserves and drieds. The Sunshine Preserves on page 33 are especially good and you let them "cook" outside on a hot day! They taste fresh and the fruit plumps up in the syrup. The fruit newton bar recipe is hard to find anywhere else and with a little tweaking, makes a great cookie. The sugared orange shell and orange marmalade make a pretty and elegant gift and are fun to fix. The brandied fruit recipes...well, if you make them and give them as gifts, expect to be bugged for more the next year! I learned how to smoke meat from this book, too.

Do you can tomatoes for your family because they are better than "store bought"?

Do you taste the difference? - Is there any difference in the taste?

For years I have been canning and eating home grown tomatoes. I love them and my family love them. In my opinion nothing you can buy compares to the quality and taste. Now, I'm asking you.

The latest canning recommendations are based on the 2006 revision of the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning.

Two of the recommendations involve new waiting time recommendations. These new waiting time recommendations were added to improve lid performance and reduce sealing failures. These directions should be added to canning procedures for all products.

1. In 2006, water bath canning directions were updated, advising consumers to "Wait 5 minutes before removing jars" to be consistent with a major canning lid manufacturer's advice based on their research on lid functioning and seal formation. (When using a boiling water canner: "After jars have been processed in boiling water for the recommended time, turn off the heat and remove the canner lid. Wait 5 minutes before removing jars from the boiling water bath canner.")

2. Also in 2006, pressure canning directions were updated advising consumers to "Wait 10 minutes, unfasten the lid, and remove it carefully" to be consistent with a major U.S. pressure canner manufacturer's advice, as well the advice from the major U.S. canning lid manufacturer. (When using a pressure canner:) "After the canner is completely depressurized, remove the weight from the vent port or open the petcock. Wait 10 minutes; then unfasten the lid and remove it carefully."

WHAT ABOUT THE DANGERS OF CANNING?

Botulism

Nearly everyone has heard about a deadly form of food poisoning called botulism. It is a type of food spoilage that usually occurs in low-acid foods. The organisms that cause it have some peculiar characteristics: they thrive without air in sealed jars, can't be destroyed by being processed at the temperature of boiling water (212 degrees F.) in a reasonable amount of time, and can't be easily detected when a jar is opened.

Through botulism doesn't occur in acid foods such as tomatoes (except low acid tomatoes) and other fruits, it can occur in virtually all vegetables, meat, poultry, and fish. That is why these foods must always be processed at 240 degrees F in the steam pressure canner.

Other types of food spoilage that might occur if jars of food aren't sealed properly are more easily detected. If the food smells bad or is soft, discolored, or moldy, discard it without tasting it.

If in doubt, throw it out!

THE EMBELLISHMENTS

Your grandmother might have stuck to basic pickled cucumbers and beets, but you can find all kinds of creative new recipes for making chutneys, spicy salsas and preserved fruits at home.

Every culture has its preserving traditions, from *Moroccan salted lemons to *Hungarian pickled peppers, Chicken Scallion Yakitori and Miso Soup. Start with simple fruit jams, then get creative with mustard pickles, spicy chutney or pickled asparagus and herb-infused wine jelly.

Soon you'll have a collection of glistening jars in the pantry, homemade condiments for daily dinners or holiday gifts.

* Recipes provided below.

Preserved lemons is the secret ingredient in many Moroccan meals - the je ne sais quoi, the dose of Moroccan mystery.

It has been secretly used a whole lot in salmon, olive stew, salade cuite, and in vegetarian chickpea tagine.

To me, preserved lemons are the premier secret ingredient in North African cuisine.

Their taste is a bit tart, yes, but it is intensely lemony and different from using just juice and zest. The lemons are preserved whole-flesh, pith, and zest - by being packed in salt and their own juice for a month. The result is small, round, yellow lemons (you generally start with the smallest, roundest ones) that are soft and entirely edible, although I still remove the seeds. I think it is the pith and the skin that make them taste more like lemon than any lemon you've ever had. To use them, you can slice or dice as you wish - just be sure to give them a quick rinse. And if you want to tone down their flavor, blanch them for 30 seconds to a minute in boiling water.

If you don't want to make them yourself they are not hard to find. There they'll be, bobbing like apples at a country fair at the Whole Foods Mediterranean Market - the first place to check. You can also order them from Amazon.

They are very easy to make following a process similar to this one I have given you. If you do make them yourself, you can use Meyer lemons or regular lemons and spice them however you like.

Moroccan Preserved Lemon Quarters

A Traditional Condiment

In Morocco, salted lemons are a staple of every kitchen. This traditional condiment is a newcomer to the American culinary scene.

There are many variation of this recipe - ranging from simple salt and lemons through to a variety of added spices. The recipe here is the one I have used for years,

The lemons last for about one year. If they get a white jelly-like substance after a few months... don't worry. The lemons will still be fine.

Remember to rinse them well before using. This is important as they can be far too salty if you forget to do this.

If you are doing a large leg of lamb, consider using the entire preserved lemon (after rinsing).

CANNING RECIPE:

1. Take each lemon and slice it in four, but without making the cut all the way through. Then, holding the lemon open, coat each portion with salt. I know this sounds strange, but iodised salt is best as lack of iodine is causing problems world wide and a lot of so-called fancy salts lack iodine.

2. Place a tablespoon or so of salt in the bottom of a clean preserving jar and place the lemons in - squashing them down as you go. As you fill it up, add a couple more tablespoons of salt.

3. Now - for added flavour try adding a couple of cinnamon sticks, four or five cloves, a sprinkle of coriander seeds, a couple of bay leaves and eight or nine black pepper corns.

4. Next, fill the jar to the top with lemon juice and seal tightly. Leave it in a mildly warm dark space for about five or six weeks. Turn the jar upside down .. then right side up every few days.

Once you open it, keep it in a refrigerator or very cool space. You can add a new lemon plus salt and juice from time to time.

Yield: 4 servings

MMMMM

Hot Hungarian Pickled Peppers - Beautiful to look at .. delicious to eat!

CANNING RECIPE:

4 quarts Hungarian or Banana peppers

1 ½ cups pickling salt

4 quarts water

10 cups 5% vinegar

2 cups water

¼ cup sugar

2 cloves garlic

~ Cut 2 small slits into each pepper

~ Dissolve the pickling salt 4-quarts of water

~ Pour over peppers in a large bowl or pot

~ Weigh down with a seal tight bag full of water in it to keep peppers submerged

~ Let stand 12-18 hours in a cool place

~ Drain, rinse and then drain thoroughly again

~ Combine remaining ingredients in a medium saucepot; simmer for 15 minutes

~ Remove garlic

~ Pack peppers in hot jars leaving ¼" headspace

~ Ladle hot liquid over peppers leaving ¼" headspace

~ Remove air bubbles with a non-metallic utensil

~ Put on lids

~ Process 10 minutes in a boiling-water canner

GREEN TOMATO RELISH

8 green tomatoes

1 red pepper

1 yellow pepper

4 onions

1 1/3 C. white sugar

1 1/3 C. vinegar

1 1/3 Tbsp. salt

2 Tbsp. celery seed

1/3 Tbsp. turmeric

~ Grind tomatoes, peppers and onions.

~ Put in a cheesecloth-lined colander and drain overnight.

The next day:

~ Combine vegetables and all other ingredients.

~ Bring to a boil and cook for 15 minutes.

~ Pour into jars and seal using the Hot Water Method.

I like to make this relish because my family all tell me it's the best relish around! I also like to take a jar of it as a gift for our hostess when we're invited out to eat.

Ball Pint Regular Mouth Jars and Lids BPA Free, 16 oz, Set of 12
Ball Pint Regular Mouth Jars and Lids BPA Free, 16 oz, Set of 12

Since my family is down to two now. I am using pint jars. Make sure they are wide mouth.

A tip: When the jar has sealed and is cool, take the rings off, wash them and store them in a dry place. If you leave them on the jars they will rust and you won't be able to use them again.

 

Canning Equipment - The essentials

A guest has requested my recommendation as to where they should buy canning utensils. I am recommending Amazon. If you live in Canada make sure you order it from www.@Amazon.ca because sometimes the shipping and border fees will be added if ordered from USA . If you live in the USA, order it from www.@Amazon.com, of course.

Canning Jars

Canning jars come in different sizes and shapes. The wide-mouthed ones are most convenient for packing large pieces of food such as pickles.

Small jars are good for jams, jellies or individual servings. Special fancy jars with brightly colored lids are available just for jelly-making.

Another Challenge Met!

YEAH!

This page was made to meet the challenge of Carol Fisher for the Weekly Challenge - August 9 to 15th. Topic: Fall - Season of Mellow Fruitfulness

I hope that you will find this page "CAN IT!" useful, informative and entertaining.

You Made My Day

This page was awarded a purple star.

Purple Star?

According to the Purple Star Program:they are awarded to pages that are:

"Masterpiece lenses.

Lenses making a name for themselves.

Lenses trying new things."

What an honor!

An Added Bonus!

This Squidoo lens got LotD

Lens of the Day

September 23, 2011

Thank you SquidTeam!

LaraineRose

You Can make a page like this.

Be careful, you may earn money if you do!

If you are interested in learning how to publish a page like this, it is really quite easy. Just open a free account and start your own hub page on a topic of your choice.

You get assistance from others when you ask for help and there is a lot of information on tap to help you make your pages fabulous, addictive and fun.

Come give it a try.

**If you have enjoyed this page, please take a moment to "Like, Twitter and Facebook" this page at the top.


Have you a favorite canning recipe?

Maybe you don't can .. do you like eating home-canned peaches .. or what? Please leave a comment.

Do you can it? - Please let us know.

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    • AstroGremlin profile image

      AstroGremlin 4 years ago

      I love pressure canning. I put my favorite apple butter recipe on one of my lenses. Have canned many jars of this apple butter and it's great on vanilla ice cream.

    • nonaweeks profile image

      Nona Weeks 4 years ago from Florissant, CO

      I enjoy canning pepper jelly, but I will be trying other things since reading this lens. Thank you for sharing.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Im2keys: Once you start, you probably will always can. I think more and more people are canning now that the price of food is skyrocketing.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @kristalulabelle: I am happy that I encouraged you!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @LouisaDembul: I think that the more you can, the more you will enjoy it. I picked a bunch of green tomatoes that will last me a few months as they ripen. My storage room is now full of tomatoes and other good eating and will taste good when the fresh ones are gone.

      Thank you for visiting my canning lens.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @LouisaDembul: I think that the more you can, the more you will enjoy it. I picked a bunch of green tomatoes that will last me a few months as they ripen. My storage room is now full of tomatoes and other good eating and will taste good when the fresh ones are gone.

      Thank you for visiting my canning lens.

    • profile image

      Im2keys 4 years ago

      I have never canned anything, but remember my grandmother canning blackberry preserves! You have a super lens here, makes me want to learn to do this :o)

    • kristalulabelle profile image

      Kristen 4 years ago from Wisconsin

      It is my goal to start canning one of these days. I would prefer to buy a home and grow a garden first though. Thanks for the fantastic tips, very helpful and now I want to can more than ever!

    • LouisaDembul profile image

      LouisaDembul 5 years ago

      I don't like canning so much, but love eating home-canned vegetables and fruit! So we do it, now it's tomato season here and they are red, ripe and good...

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @irminia: It is true. Usually a canning book will tell you but I have some that don't.

    • irminia profile image

      irminia 5 years ago

      I never even tried to can - and I'm amazed theat one has to take into account altitude. Thank you!

    • earthybirthymum profile image

      earthybirthymum 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      What an amazing Lense! A definite go to for canning instructions :) many Blessings

      Cheers

      Grace

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 5 years ago from United States

      Really excellent canning instructions! I started canning when I was very young and spending the summers with my grandmother. We literally did it all from beginning to end. She had a garden. Usually I was too late to help plant, but I was there to pick, can and eat :)

    • VeseliDan profile image

      VeseliDan 5 years ago

      These recipes are great! I will definitely try them out. *blessed*

    • UKGhostwriter profile image

      UKGhostwriter 5 years ago

      We'er not great canners in Great britain, but I'm inspred now!

    • profile image

      EnjoyLens 5 years ago

      Beautiful lens! Great job!

    • bushaex profile image

      Stephen Bush 5 years ago from Ohio

      I thoroughly enjoyed spending some time on another of your Purple Star winning lenses!

    • zigpop lm profile image

      zigpop lm 5 years ago

      Great lens, very informative and detailed. It is clear you took a lot of time with this lens. Thanks for sharing!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @winter aconite: Thank you so very much for your visit. I'll try to visit you soon.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Gayle Dowell: Good for you! I hope that you will try the Moroccan Lemons. I promise you, you won't be disappointed! Thank you for blessing this lens!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Gypzeerose: Thank you so much for your visit and blessing. You are so right, the lemons make very nice gifts and I believe most people will want to try their own hand at preserving them if they just try them once.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @naturegirl7s: I am so happy that you are going to try the lemons. They are a favorite of mine! Thank you for blessing this lens! I'll be stopping by your lenses soon.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @getwellsoon: My family love them! Thank you for your visit!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: I have been sometimes been tempted to buy fresh tomatoes from the store during the winter months just because they do look good. Ugh! I am so happy to have tomatoes canned! Thank you for your visit!

    • Alethia LM profile image

      Alethia LM 5 years ago

      Never canned before; but I think I might just give it a go after reading this! Thanks for the helpful hints!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Alethia LM: Good for you! I'm sure that you will find it rewarding!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @peggygallyot: I hope that this lens will help you. Canning is very rewarding!

    • winter aconite profile image

      winter aconite 5 years ago

      I love this lens, so many good tips and recipes!!!

    • Gayle Dowell profile image

      Gayle Dowell 5 years ago from Kansas

      Great lens and recipes I need to try this summer. I need to do more canning. Now maybe I will.

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 5 years ago

      It is important to can and learn other ways of preserving food safely, I throw away way too much, and want to be able to take advantage of harvests. I checked out the Sunset book you listed - it sounds really good.Wonderful lens - I am not that excited about the canned tomatoes - nothing tastes as good as fresh in my mind - but those Moroccan preserved lemon quarters sound really exciting, and I think they would make lovely and unique Christmas presents - especially with a complimentary recipe. Add one more Angel Blessing to the collection.

    • naturegirl7s profile image

      Yvonne L. B. 5 years ago from Covington, LA

      I plan to use many of the recipes here to can the produce from my garden. I especially liked the preserved lemons. Wonderful lens. ***Blessed***

    • profile image

      getwellsoon 5 years ago

      Mmmm, the stewed tomatoes looked so good!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Have canned a lot back in Europe when we did not have the supermarkets with imports all year round. had years with 500 jars of preserves, jams, compots, mushrooms, aubergines, fruit juices, zakuska, grilled peppers (yummy!!), tomato juice, marmalade, and much more. Home canned food is really very good, pity people forgot about making them -- they are chemical free and from clean, natural ingredients. Nice lens!

    • peggygallyot profile image

      peggygallyot 5 years ago

      I don't know how to can. It would be nice to try.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @futurefocus57: Coming soon!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @ItayaLightbourne: Thank you!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Superwriter711: Thank you!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @MJsConsignments: Good find! I am not surprised that the cookbooks sold quickly. I love cookbooks. When I have time (usually in the winter) I sit and read them like some people read novels. Thank you for your visit and your comment!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Diana Wenzel: Oh, thank you! So good to have you visit again and thank you also for the blessing!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @BeadCatz: Great! I'll be watching for the recipes. More is always better when it comes to recipes!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @WindyWintersHubs: So nice to have you visit! Thank you!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @blessedmomto7: Just a little tip. Try planting your tomatoes in a different spot this year. They like to be moist but not soggy. They love direct sunshine too. I hope you have more success this year! Wishing you all the best.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @hubleigh: We dehydrate plums, cherries and apricots. There are so many wonderful things you can do with canned tomatoes and fruit that I'm sure you will enjoy the results when you do can. Thank you for your visit.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @SoSimplyStephanie: 50 plants! My dear you are going to be canning day and night if they all produce! I plant about 20 and that I believe is enough for us. WOW! I can't believe it! 50 plants!! You are really ambitious!

    • futurefocus57 profile image

      futurefocus57 5 years ago

      Any salsa...I can't get enough.

    • ItayaLightbourne profile image

      Itaya Lightbourne 5 years ago from Topeka, KS

      Wow! What an extensive article on canning! Very impressive and very much deserving a Purple Star! Congrats on being on the front page too. :)

    • Superwriter711 profile image

      Superwriter711 5 years ago

      This all looks so delicious!

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      Michelle 5 years ago from Central Ohio, USA

      My grandmothers always canned, my mom does and so does my mother-in-law. No two of them do things the same! I sell on eBay. I ran across a flatbed trailer load of cookbooks once that included more than a dozen different ones on canning. As soon as I listed them, they sold. Amazing!

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      Renaissance Woman 5 years ago from Colorado

      Stopping back by to say "congrats!" on your front page feature. Always wonderful to enjoy an excellent lens twice. *Blessed*

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      BeadCatz 5 years ago

      Great article. I have been canning for many years and I have written several articles on preserving food. Tomatoes are my favorite. It looks like we are going to have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year so I am planning several canning recipes.

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      WindyWintersHubs 5 years ago from Vancouver Island, BC

      Congrats on the front page! Excellent tips for canning especially delicious tomatoes! Blessed!

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      blessedmomto7 5 years ago

      Fabulous lens. I have all the canning equipment, but last year my tomatoes didn't produce well in my garden. I'm a beginnner, so I am hoping my garden does better this year so I can can. So far, I have just done freezer jam.

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      hubleigh 5 years ago

      I've tried dehydrating with some success but have never tried to can stuff. That might be my next trick. :-) thanks for an extremely detailed lens

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @ecogranny: I have canned even those with success. I do add a bit more salt. Some people like to freeze those but I prefer mine either raw or canned. I did mention it under "Dangers of Canning." Easy to miss though. I only know of one tomato considered to be low in acid and that is the Italian San Marzano tomatoes (plum tomato).

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @microfarmproject: You are welcome. Thanks for visiting!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @GramaBarb: Thank you, Barbara! I appreciate you!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @GramaBarb: Thank you, Barbara! I appreciate you!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @gypsykitschpres: Thank you for your tweets. 52,000 followers, wow!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Ladyeaglefeather: Umm apple butter is delicious. I put a smidge of cinnamon in mine. Its sooo good!

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      Stephanie 5 years ago from DeFuniak Springs

      Very nice lens. I am growing almost 50 tomato plants this year in hopes of being able to can tomato sauce to use in spaghetti, chili, soups and other such dishes. Great lens! Pinning it!

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      Kathryn Grace 5 years ago from San Francisco

      Today my canning forays are limited to jams, jellies and preserves, but I do enjoy working with the colorful fruits gifting the lovely jewel jars, and especially eating the sweets. So much better than store bought!

      One thing. I may have missed it, but I did not see a mention of making sure the tomatoes you can are high in acid. Many tomatoes today have had the acid bred out, and are unsafe to can by either open kettle or the water bath method.

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      microfarmproject 5 years ago

      Great! Thanks for sharing!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I did the dance of joy back here to congratulate you on front page honors!

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      GramaBarb 5 years ago from Vancouver

      Congrats on the the Squidoo frontpage feature! Great lens!

    • gypsykitschpres profile image

      gypsykitschpres 5 years ago

      Great lens! I used to love to can. I squidoo liked this and tweeted it to my following of 52,000 and growing! tweet tweet :-)))

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      Ladyeaglefeather 5 years ago

      When a was little my mother would can everything you can think of. My favorite was apple butter.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Yes, more and more people are growing what they have room for even taking part in community gardens. Thank you, Susie for blessing this lens.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @DANCING COWGIRL: Thank you for your visit and don't stress about missing anything .. you'll catch on soon. It takes a while but from what I've seen, you are doing well.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      This canning lens is such a wonderful resource.

      "Can it" ... that is something more people are doing.

      Growing fresh vegetables it a reward in itself.

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      Dancing Cowgirl Design 5 years ago from Texas

      Gosh, you have me longing for my aunt and grandmother. They used to get together and put up fruits and vegetables and have the best time together. I would really love a few jars of that now. Great lens and Congrats on your LOTD, sorry I missed it then. I was new here and still learning my way around, but I'm glad to have found it now. Best Wishes

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Brandi Bush: I don't know why, but makes me happy when others want to can. I guess it is just the mother in me. I hope you fulfill your desire.

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      Brandi 5 years ago from Maryland

      So great that this was lens of the day! Well deserved! :) I think you inspired me to dust off my canning equipment this year...thanks!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @flicker lm: I would love to live where I could have a lemon tree growing out side. Until then I buy them when they are on sale. The clerks always ask me what I'm going to do with 'all of those lemons.' It is nice to hear that you are able to use the pressure canner .. I have a large one and use it to preserve some of my vegetables. Mum used to can our meat that way. Boy, was that ever tender and tasty!

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      flicker lm 5 years ago

      Thanks for the useful info! I had never heard of preserved lemons before. I use the pressure canning method for all my canning, even tomatoes. I haven't canned any fruit yet, which I would certainly use the water bath method for.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @norma-holt: WOW! Thank you for including this lens on all of those lenses. I really appreciate it!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @mary lighthouse15: It is so easy to do! You need a bit of equipment but once you have it there is no need to buy more. I really encourage you to try it.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @SayGuddaycom: Perhaps storage would be a problem for your canning on a boat. One thing that would be easy to store is canned jam. It is so easy to do and better than anything you can buy. It's a thought.

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      norma-holt 5 years ago

      Wonderful lens and right up my alley. Congrats on LOTD. Blessed and featured on Blessed by Skiesgreen 2012, Squidoo LOTD Lenses and also on Pickles. Hugs

    • mary lighthouse15 profile image

      mary lighthouse15 5 years ago

      Interesting lens. I want to try canning one day, looks easy to do :)

    • SayGuddaycom profile image

      SayGuddaycom 5 years ago

      This is a great lens. I live on a boat so canning is something that has been on my mind for a long time.Thank you for this information.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @kathysart: I liked your comment. It gave me the chance to tell everyone that I still am using ripe tomatoes from our garden. They were green when I picked them but now they are ripe. Imagine that .. Jan. 17th. Now I must admit .. it is the very end of them and they aren't very tasty, but we did enjoy them for a very long time. Thank you for your visit, Kathy and the blessing too.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: I'd be over the moon if I could have a lemon and lime tree. Unfortunately, they don't grow here. I do try to buy organic fruit when I can so hopefully they are not sprayed too much. Thank you for your visit .. I'll be seeing you shortly.

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      kathysart 5 years ago

      I used to can a LOT. Wow when all the tomatoes ripen at once what else are you going to do? LOL. Angel blessed lens!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      It was a great lens Laraine, and I like the look of the Moroccan lemon quarters I have never tried that before I have a lemon and a lime tree that always produces to much fruit so I tend to supply the neighbourhood, I am not sure if that recipe would work for the limes as well but I'll give it a go, I love both of them in cooking so will jot down the recipe and give it to my other half. Everyone in my house are a lot better cooks than me ( I tell them that all the time it works wonders)

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      My mother canned a lot. I will be back, you have so many things I would like to do, on your lens.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Anthony Altorenna: Thank you for the visit. I would have liked to have known your grandmother .. I'm sure.

      I hope that this will help you if you decide to can. Thank you for the blessings too.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @goo2eyes lm: Sure, as long as they will seal that is a good thing to use and probably just the right size to use if you want to use them for a sauce.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @sudokunut: Be brave .. once you have done it you will wonder why you didn't start sooner.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Thank you for the offer.

    • Anthony Altorenna profile image

      Anthony Altorenna 5 years ago from Connecticut

      My grandmother used to preserve vegetables from her large garden but sadly, I did not learn her techniques. Thank you for the excellent step-by-step instructions and photos to show us how to Can It. Very well done!

    • goo2eyes lm profile image

      goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      i put them in used and clean marmalade bottles.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: I'm happy that you commented and I will be visiting your lenses shortly.

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      Mark Falco 5 years ago from Reno, Nevada

      Wonderful lens on canning. This year we had a lot of tomatoes but ended up making pasta sauce and freezing it as none of us were brave enough to try canning. Maybe next year.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi, LaraineRose.

      Thanks so much for squid-liking my How To Learn Russian Fast For Free lens.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Very interesting! Love it.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Thank you, well put!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Beautiful presentation! Very well canned! :)

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: That sounds like a great combination. The carrots may even make the tomatoes taste sweeter. I'll try a few pints to see how it tastes. Would probably make good soup too.

      Thank you for you comment. I'm on my way now to visit you.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Sounds like your dear grandmother has a garden. I'm sure that she enjoys your appreciation of her produce. It is always a joy to cook for someone. Yeah Gramma!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Charlino99: We've been having a lot of rain lately. Today was sunny and warm and we pulled out a lot of the garden. Some of the tomatoes were splitting so I picked them and saved what I could and made a big pot of spaghetti sauce. We'll leave the rest of the tomatoes in for another week but we may have to cover them at night as we have frost warnings now.

      Thank you for visiting my lens. I'll be coming to visit you soon.