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Easy veggie soup stock from scratch

Updated on November 8, 2014
ecogranny profile image

A long-time whole grain baker, Kathryn discovered the thrill and ease of cooking with whole, fresh foods decades ago. Still chopping!

A pot of tomato-vegetable soup stock just coming to the boil on top of the stove
A pot of tomato-vegetable soup stock just coming to the boil on top of the stove | Source

Make homemade soup in 30 minutes with this easy-to-make vegetable stock

With this easy method, you can have homemade vegetable stock always on hand and ready to add to your soup pot any day of the year.

Just a young bride, more than forty years gone, I learned this veggie soup stock trick, and it has never failed. With it, you will save time in the kitchen, save money, and make a delicious soup at the drop of the stock-pot lid.

It's so easy to do, highly economical, and sure to provide you with the most flavorful and densest nutrients of any soup stock you can make or buy.

How to build your veggie stock

Nearly full veggie stock bowl with fresh carrot shavings
Nearly full veggie stock bowl with fresh carrot shavings | Source

What is your favorite winter-time soup?

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Every time you cook, save the odd bits of vegetables in a freezer bowl

Here, I've tossed in a few carrot butt ends & shavings to the bowl I keep in the freezer to catch the trimmings. No matter how small the bits, I add them each time I cook.

Today it might be a few peas and the small amount of (cooled) water in which I cooked them. Tonight it may be trimmed bits of celery, radish and lettuce that just aren't pretty enough for my salad. Tomorrow morning, when I peel sweet potatoes for my Crock Pot mash, I'll add the trimmings to the bowl.

That will fill the bowl and that means soup's on! As soon as the bowl is full, I drop it down to the refrigerator compartment where it thaws slowly. When I'm ready to make soup, I pour the goodies into my stock pot, season them a bit, and let it simmer for ten minutes or so.


Toss in whatever trimmings or leftovers you have each day, on top of whatever is already frozen. When the bowl is full, thaw and make soup or stock.

To build your veggie soup stock, you'll need a container that fits your family size and your freezer

1-quart veggie stock bowl in freezer
1-quart veggie stock bowl in freezer | Source

For just two of us, that's a quart bowl

There are only two of us at home these days, and our mid-sized refrigerator sports a small freezer compartment.

We keep a covered quart bowl in the freezer for the vegetable bits that will become our veggie stock. When my children were at home, I kept a 2-quart container in the freezer.

This bowl contains a lot of finely chopped kale bits and a few carrot shavings. Not visible: a little chopped onion, some potato cuts not pretty enough to serve or mash, and a few other odds and ends collected over the last week.


Pyrex 6022369 Storage 14-Piece Round Set, Clear with Blue Lids
Pyrex 6022369 Storage 14-Piece Round Set, Clear with Blue Lids

These are by far the most versatile and useful storage bowls we have.

 

We use a Pyrex 1 quart bowl to freeze our vegetable soup stock

We're gradually replacing all our plastic ware with glass storage bowls and jars. I love Pyrex ware because the lids fit securely and do not wear out as fast as many other plastic lids.

Pyrex glass is both freezer and oven safe. In the freezer, you always want to leave about 1/4-1/2 inch air space for expansion of any liquids.

Pyrex bowls seem to be better tempered than other glass bowls I have tried. They do not chip as easily and perform very well in the refrigerator, the freezer and the oven.

A word of caution to the brand new cook

If you are using glassware that is safe for both oven and freezer, always bring frozen glassware gradually to room temperature before placing in a heated oven.

Make sure, too, that it is completely dry on the outside before placing it in the oven. Never set a hot glass bowl on top of or next to a damp surface.

Nutrient rich kale stems are a constant in our soup stocks

Chopping kale stems, denuded of their leaves
Chopping kale stems, denuded of their leaves | Source

We eat kale 2-3 times a week during the winter months, and frequently during the summer as well.

The stems are too tough for many of the recipes I use, but I'm not letting those valuable nutrients go to waste! I pay a premium for my fresh, organic produce, and I want every last bite of goodness for my bucks.

It takes only a minute or two to chop the stems of an entire bunch fine and pop them into my freezer bowl.

Save your veggie cooking water too!

Frozen potato cooking water with yellow pepper bits
Frozen potato cooking water with yellow pepper bits | Source

We lose tons of nutrients when we pour veggie cooking water down the drain

When you boil or steam your vegetables, many of the nutrients--and a lot of the flavor--leach into the cooking water. Don't toss those vitamins and minerals down the drain! Freeze them for soup stock!

Let the cooking water cool completely. After dinner, when you're cleaning up the kitchen, pour the cooled cooking water, along with any stray bits of vegetables, into your freezer stock bowl.

Here, we've frozen potato cooking water from the boiled potatoes we mashed last week. That same night, I added some leftover bits of yellow bell pepper. We had more than needed for our dinner salad and not enough to save, so I popped it into the freezer bowl.

Just now, I chopped up some tough beet stems, left over from the tender greens I used in a salad for tonight's supper. They're going into the bowl, too, right on top of the frozen goodies. Soon the bowl will be full, and I'll thaw it to make a hearty kale and potato soup.

Every time you cook

Save all the bits and pieces of your veggies that just won't do in your current recipe--the ugly spots you excise; potato, carrot and squash peelings.

They're all rich in vitamins and minerals, and when they've boiled down in your soup, they'll add rich color and flavor.

Beet greens and stems, rich in iron and antioxidants

Chopped beet greens & stems
Chopped beet greens & stems | Source

Chopped beet greens and stems make healthy vegetable stock

We love roasted beets, but quite often the greens and stems are not as tender as we would like for salads.

When we clean the beets for roasting, we clean the greens too. The tender greens are a tasty addition to our tossed salads. They also make a delicious side dish, braised or sauteed with onions, a tart apple and a little vinegar.

The older greens and tougher stems don't go to waste either. We chop them coarsely and pop them into the freezer bowl.

Beet greens and stems make delicious hearty soups with a darker broth. I have to say, the stocks with beet greens are among the most flavorful. And think of all that iron and calcium!

Thawed veggies soon to be stock

Thawed veggies with added onions, leeks
Thawed veggies with added onions, leeks | Source

Here, you see a quart of veggies in my soup pot. I know, this looks like it belongs in the compost pail, right? But it's going to make the most delicious soup for tonight's supper.

We ate mostly fresh vegetables last week, so we had very little veggie cooking water to add to the bowl. It's almost all fresh-frozen vegetable goodness.

You can see a small amount of thawing liquid in the kettle here.These chopped veggies will cook down mostly to mush, unless you want soup fast, like I do tonight.

I've got about thirty minutes to make a quick supper. After they've cooked tender, I'll puree them right in the pot, with my stick blender.

If I had more time, I'd strain them to get a clear broth, but since it's just the two of us, I'll use the puree as is, add a few potatoes, an onion and some garlic, some cooked black beans, and a pile of chopped fresh kale.

We'll sop our soup with homemade sourdough bread. Yum.

Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel 8-Quart Stock Pot with Cover
Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel 8-Quart Stock Pot with Cover

Calphalon is a good, mid-range, stainless steel pot and comes in a number of sizes. This 8-quart holds soup for a family of four nicely. The perfectly balanced, triple-riveted handles are specially designed to be cool to the touch on the stove top

 

A good quality stock pot makes soup making easy

It's easy to make soup quickly when you have just the right size stock pot.

For just the two of us, I use a four-quart stainless steel Calphalon pot.

With its heavy-gauge aluminum core, sandwiched between two layers of stainless steel, the pan is heavy enough to feel sturdy, lightweight enough to be easy to handle.

It also has a glass dome lid that lets me see how the stock or soup is doing without lifting the lid and losing valuable steam and juices.

Simmering veggie stock, with a few spices, chopped onion & minced garlic added

Soup stock simmering in pot
Soup stock simmering in pot | Source

Simmering stock, 15 minutes later

To my thawing veggies, I added a quart of plain water, 1/2 teaspoon salt, a few twists of freshly ground pepper, 1/4 teaspoon chili powder, 1 minced clove garlic and 1/2 cup chopped onion to get this deep, rich soup base in less than twenty minutes.

If you want a thicker, smoother stock, you can puree this mixture. I sometimes do that for guests, but when it's just the two of us, most of the time I keep it simple.

Quite often, I add all my larger cut vegetables with the simmering stock, raise the heat and cook them together.

That gives me a beautiful rustic soup like my Hearty Kale, Cabbage & Potato Soup.

For clear broth, strain your stock

If you need clear broth for a special recipe, strain and reserve the bits for your next batch of soup.

Want your stock smooth & creamy? Quickly puree your stock with the Breville Cordless Immersion Blender

I love power tools, and the Breville Immersion Blender has plenty of oomph.

For blending the veggie bits in your stock, making a quick cream soup or a smoothie, the Breville stick blender does the trick better than any I've used.

Best of all, it's cordless, with a smart battery that is designed to lose "very little" of its charging time over the life of the blender.

Overall, far more reviewers are happy with this blender than any of the others I researched. It is specially designed to avoid that suction problem you find with so many blenders, and draws the chunks of food in so you don't have to whir it around the bowl or pan.

See the Breville Immersion Blender in action

This is the corded version. I like it because it has the wire whisk--so handy for whisking mayonnaise, meringues and whipped cream.

Rustic Kale Potato Soup starts with my easy veggie stock - Serve it with artisan bread and it's a full meal

Kale Potato Soup with Whole Wheat Batard
Kale Potato Soup with Whole Wheat Batard | Source

Rustic Kale Potato Soup with crusty Pumpkin-Sesame Seed Whole Wheat Bread

This soup, which started with the freezer stock simmering above, took about 20 minutes to prepare, counting the time to prepare the stock, start to finish, and simmered another 10 minutes while I played at other things.

Sure, I could have simmered the stock till the bits turned to mush and thickened the broth, but we were in no mood to wait. It is so good!

While the stock simmered for 10 minutes, I washed and coarsely chopped a pound of Yukon Gold potatoes, 2 medium carrots, half a leek, and 3-4 large kale leaves. Dumped 'em all in the pot, turned up the heat to a soft boil and let them gurgle gently for another 10 minutes.

In the last 5 minutes, I added 1/2 teaspoon Garam Masala, which is a delightful blend of Indian spices and gives the dish a delicate nuanced flavor and fills the house with that "What's cooking! Yum!" factor.

For the yummiest most nutritious soups

Always start with the freshest, most vibrant-colored produce you can find. Best flavor-plus-nutrients punch for your buck: Locally grown and in-season. Wins every time.

Remember coming home from school on a cold, windy day--the kind of day that sends stinging rain into your face--and opening the door to the scent of a hot pot of soup or chili on the stove? Perhaps fresh baked bread warming on the counter top? What is your favorite childhood soup story?

© 2012 Kathryn Grace

Got a favorite childhood soup story?

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    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you, @prasetio30, much obliged.

    • prasetio30 profile image

      prasetio30 2 years ago from malang-indonesia

      Hmm.....Delicious. I love the recipe. Just looking at the pictures makes me hungry. Thanks for writing and sharing. I can't wait to make it soon. Voted up!

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you, @Brite-Ideas. As long as your soup looks good with a little ruddiness, they are one of the healthiest additions I know.

    • Brite-Ideas profile image

      Barbara Tremblay Cipak 2 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      Kathryn, a fabulous page - excellent. I've never thought to use the Beet Greens in a soup? glad I stopped by, I'll remember that tip from this page - pinning to my food board of course for future reference.

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      Wow. That's amazing. Grateful to all of you who stopped by to take a look at this page and comment in the past couple of days. Don't know how you found it all at once, but I certainly thank you.

      Thank you, @Lady Lorelei. This stock makes soup making so easy. Last night, we had a pumpkin kale soup, made with leftover pumpkin puree from my Thanksgiving pumpkins, in about 30 minutes from start to finish, thanks to having this stock on hand.

      @dahoglund, once you get used to cooking with less salt, you wonder why so much food is over-salted. Keep in touch and feel free to ask lots of questions. I'm happy to support anyone working to find ways to cook healthier without giving up fabulous flavors, textures and colors.

      @sara0129, you're welcome. Let me know how it goes.

      No problem, @Besarien. I know how easy it is to get tongue-tied, or should I say type-twisted! We seem to be on the same page when it comes to food and cooking. I tried feeding my plants vegetable cooking water in the 70s, but they grew mold on top, so I had to leave off. Now it all goes in my stock freezer bowl.

      @DressageHusband, you are so right about that. I hate throwing money away, even if it is into the compost bucket!

      @MelRootsNWrites, if you knew me, you would know I rarely do anything in the kitchen if it's not easy, except my current project: I'm learning how to make a high-rising 100 percent whole wheat bread with wild yeast sourdough starter. It's anything but easy so far, but that's another subject altogether.

    • Lady Lorelei profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 2 years ago from Canada

      In the winter deep freeze here and homemade soup sounds like a really good plan. Your photos look so tasty.

    • dahoglund profile image

      Don A. Hoglund 2 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      I am sort of new at making soups rather than using canned soups and vegetables but I have been put on a low sodium diet. As such I need ideas like yours. It is a lot to absorb so I am bookmarking it. up ratings and sharing.

    • sara0129 profile image

      Shamim Rajabali 2 years ago from Texas

      Have always wanted to make my own stock. Liked your recipe. Thanks.

    • Besarien profile image

      Besarien 2 years ago

      Sorry ecogranny! I just noticed that I called you Nell Rose. Just came from one of her hubs and apparently my head got stuck over there for a minute. I do apologize. Please forgive my mistake.

    • Besarien profile image

      Besarien 2 years ago

      Hi Nell Rose! Great hub! I do the same thing. Anything nasty looking or otherwise suspect goes to compost. Things perfectly fine but get cut off anyway- veggie peel, woody ends of asparagus, stems that don't look pretty- that all ends up in the freezer for stock. I do give cooled veggie water to my herbs and houseplants though. They love it and flourish. I don't trust commercial plant food not to poison us. I am a butternut girl. Beautiful photos!

    • Dressage Husband profile image

      Stephen J Parkin 2 years ago from Pine Grove, Nova Scotia, Canada

      This is an extremely good idea and way to save on waste. Most people would add this stuff to their compost bin and not utilise all of those vitamins and nutrients. Grat and useful Hub!

    • MelRootsNWrites profile image

      Melody Lassalle 2 years ago from California

      I've never made vegetable stock from scratch. This seems really easy the way you have explained it. It's a great way to get rid of some of the odds and ends of the vegetables, too. Sharing!

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      @Ruth Cox, thanks for stopping by. It's always so good to see a familiar face here on HubPages. Roasted vegetables is one of our favorite easy suppers. A dollop of yogurt, a twist of fresh-ground pepper. So good!

      Like you, we enjoy them steamed too. In fact, quite often that is the cooking water I cool and toss in my freezer bowl.

    • profile image

      Ruth Cox 2 years ago

      Great tips for getting the most from the vegetables we buy. I rarely cook veggies in water, steam or roast instead, but that's a good reminder for those who do to save that water for soup stock too.

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      @ColettaTeske You're probably not anywhere nearly as old as I am, so I wonder if your mom or someone older passed the idea along after reading Adele Davis back in the 70s? That's where I learned to do this, as a young bride.

      @Ann Hinds It's a tasty and healthful way to stretch those organic dollars. Do come back and let me know how it works for you. I'm happy to answer any questions you might have.

      @BritFlorida You got it!

      @aka-rms You're welcome! Perhaps you will tell it in a hub one day?

    • aka-rms profile image

      Robin S 2 years ago from USA

      My mom makes THE best chicken noodle soup. I don't have a story to go with that but thanks for helping me conjure up some tasty memories.

    • Ann Hinds profile image

      Ann Hinds 2 years ago from So Cal

      What a great idea. We are eating more organic vegetables and I hate throwing away the left over pieces. Never thought to do this. Thanks!

    • BritFlorida profile image

      Jackie Jackson 2 years ago from Fort Lauderdale

      Almost free food - love it!

    • profile image

      ColettaTeske 2 years ago

      Glad to see you recycling here at HubPages. I love your detailed instructions and the ton of helpful tips on making vegetable soup stock. I keep a container in the freezer for food scraps and I usually have a container of ready-made stock. Homemade vegetable stock is so flavorful. Thank you!

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Donna Cook: Oh, yes, white wine adds a lovely dimension to vegetable stock. Thank you for sharing that. I absolutely love homemade tomato soup. Perhaps one of us will do a lens on the topic one of these days.

    • smine27 profile image

      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      Great tip! I never thought of this and I don't know why. This is such a great way to use leftovers.

    • profile image

      Donna Cook 3 years ago

      Terrific idea! I use vegetable stock as a base for tomato soup made from my home canned tomatoes. It's also great for adding flavor to roasts in the Crock pot. As a variation, I add white wine for a different flavor.

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @smine27: From one happy cook to another ... : )

    • Sara Krentz profile image

      Sara Krentz 4 years ago from USA

      Thanks for the tips; I'm going to try this out.

    • Rosaquid profile image

      Rosaquid 4 years ago

      I grew up on canned soup and I still get a yearning for it once i a while, but I generally cook from scratch. I love this lens! What a great idea. I hate to waste, so my scraps go in the compost, but I like this idea better. Wow! Simple and efficient. Thanks!

    • Camden1 profile image

      Camden1 4 years ago

      What a great way to use up all those little leftovers. I'm hoping it will be cool enough here soon to want to make homemade soup.

    • Diana Wenzel profile image

      Renaissance Woman 5 years ago from Colorado

      A story, eh? Okay. My dad was the master of soup-making. His specialty was a homemade chicken and dumplings soup. My very favorite soup to this day. Dad cooked as though he was feeding an army. You should have seen the size of his stock pots. When he put on a pot of soup, we could eat for weeks! This is such a fabulous web page. I was just thinking that I needed a way to reduce my vegetable waste. I was brought up not to waste anything, as my dad had experienced the Great Depression. Now I know what to do with all of the "leavings" of the veggies I chop us daily for my green smoothies. And why didn't I think of saving the cooking water? You have greatly contributed to my green lifestyle. Deep thanks!

    • sockii profile image

      Nicole Pellegrini 5 years ago from New Jersey

      My goodness, this is a wonderful page and full of such great suggestions. I'm guilty of tossing away a lot of vegetable scraps (at least when I'm at home; when I'm at my mother's it all goes to the chickens who love fresh veggies.) I am definitely going to give this a try - and also add a link to this lens on my page about Saving Money on Groceries and Eating Healthier.

    • sousababy profile image

      sousababy 5 years ago

      Thank you for sharing this with us. I hate to see food scraps go to waste and what a fabulous way to keep nutrient content high. Deserves a google +1. Hope your weekend is lovely.

      Take good care,

      Rose

    • sousababy profile image

      sousababy 5 years ago

      Potato leek soup was a comfort food for me when I was pregnant. I had a hard time with morning sickness and it just seemed to help me the most.

    • ara-bella profile image

      ara-bella 5 years ago

      I loved the creamy potato soup. My boys love it too :)

    • peachplanet profile image

      peachplanet 5 years ago

      Yum! Nice lens!

    • Aquavel profile image

      Aquavel 5 years ago

      My grandmother used to make a chicken soup with delicious meat filled dumplings. The house would fill with the comforting and delicious smell of her homemade chicken stock. I was fascinated as she rolled the dough for the dumplings and put a bit of meat in each square and then close it up - something like a wonton. When they were ready, she would put the dumplings in the soup and cook. Yum! Great memories! Great lens too!

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