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Panna Cotta with Raspberry or Blackberry Coulis (A Gluten-Free Dessert)

Updated on August 29, 2012
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Heat the gelatin and water over low heat. The gelatin is fully dissolved when the mixture turns clear.
Heat the gelatin and water over low heat. The gelatin is fully dissolved when the mixture turns clear. | Source

This luscious dessert is fabulous topped with colorful fruit. Much of how it will taste is really dependent on what you top it with. Go crazy. My favorites include strawberries, raspberries, or cherries. Included with this recipe, is also a topping for raspberry or blackberry coulis.

Ingredients

  • 1 envelope unflavored gelatin
  • 2 tbsp cold water
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup half and half
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • large pinch kosher salt
When bringing the cream, half and half, and sugar to a boil, keep stirring! When it reaches boiling temperature, it can very suddenly overflow.
When bringing the cream, half and half, and sugar to a boil, keep stirring! When it reaches boiling temperature, it can very suddenly overflow. | Source
The final product after 8 hours in the refrigerator and removed from its ramekin.
The final product after 8 hours in the refrigerator and removed from its ramekin. | Source

Instructions

  1. In a small saucepan, sprinkle the gelatin over the cold water and let stand for one minute to soften.
  2. Heat the gelatin and water mixture over low heat until the gelatin is dissolved. Remove the pan from the heat.
  3. In a large saucepan, bring the cream, half and half, and sugar to a boil over medium high heat.
  4. Remove the large saucepan from heat and stir in the gelatin mixture, vanilla, and a large pinch of kosher salt.
  5. Divide the cream mixture among 8 ramekins and let cool.
  6. Refrigerate the ramekins, covered, for a minimum of 4 hours and preferable overnight.
  7. To plate, dip the ramekins, one at a time, into a bowl of hot water for 3 second. Run a thin knife around the outside edge and turn over onto a small plate. The panna cotta should slide out easily on to the plate.
  8. Top with fruit and serve.

Raspberry or Blackberry Coulis

This berry sauce is an excellent topper to panna cotta, ice cream, or chocolate cake. Traditionally, it’s always been raspberry coulis, but I find blackberries to be even better. Since the fresh blackberries that are sold in the grocery stores are picked before they sweeten, they are often too bitter to eat by themselves. By adjusting the amount of sugar to the tartness of blackberries, you can create a very berry sauce that is better than the blackberries alone.
If covered, the coulis should keep for 2 or 3 days in the refrigerator, so you can make it ahead of time.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups fresh raspberries or blackberries
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • handful of fresh berries to garnish

Instructions

  1. Mix the raspberries or blackberries with sugar and lemon juice in a blender or food processor.
  2. Pour the mixture through a sieve into a bowl to filter out the solids (optional).
  3. Serve over your panna cotta or other dessert of choice.

How Not To Screw It Up

  1. When you are boiling the cream, don’t let “medium heat” fool you. One second it’s slowly heating, and the next it’s a boiled over mess on your stove top. Watch it very carefully.
  2. Make sure you use medium heat and not high heat, and err on the side of less heat. You want to raise the temperature of the cream to boil slowly. Otherwise, you may risk curdling the cream. Ick.
  3. I strongly recommend letting the panna cotta refrigerate overnight to ensure that it fully sets. You don’t want to risk trying to plate it and discover that the bottom half is still liquid.
  4. For the coulis: The straining of the solid is optional. Basically, you’re straining out the seeds, but leaving them in gives a more natural fruit texture to the final product, so I leave them in.
  5. For the coulis: In place of sugar, you can use honey (in a smaller quantity to taste) to sweeten the berries.

Have You Made This Panna Cotta?

5 stars from 1 rating of Panna Cotta

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    • MickiS profile image
      Author

      MickiS 5 years ago from San Francisco

      As I suspected.

      The only way that I shortcut for dinner parties, it to make the panna cotta the day before. And, as part of my prep before guests arrive, tap them out onto plates and put them back in the fridge until its time to serve.

    • PiaC profile image

      PiaC 5 years ago from Oakland, CA

      No, he makes them always in ramekins, and right before we eat dessert he taps them out. Its a bit of a production, with the entire dinner party waiting for the sweet. Hence the question :)

    • MickiS profile image
      Author

      MickiS 5 years ago from San Francisco

      I've never attempted to make it into one big family style dessert. It seems like it would be awfully hard to work with in that large of a volume. I find the trickiest part of making panna cotta to be getting it out of the ramekins all in one piece. This is where the longer refrigeration time is very helpful (to make sure it's all set and solid) and smaller volumes will refrigerate more thoroughly in a shorter period of time.

      I'm curious, since you said that your husband makes it, does he do it as one family style dessert?

    • PiaC profile image

      PiaC 5 years ago from Oakland, CA

      Panna Cotta is my favorite dessert, and something I get my husband (the dessert Chef of the family) to make for me quite often. But the berry coulis is an addition I have never considered! The combination sounds divine!One question: For the panna cotta, does the custard have to be measured into ramekins or can it be cooked as a larger family style dessert?