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Mini Kick Scooter Review

Updated on January 15, 2020

The mini kick scooter gives kids the freedom to let loose safely

Photo by Lars Plougmann http://www.flickr.com/photos/criminalintent/3932043367/
Photo by Lars Plougmann http://www.flickr.com/photos/criminalintent/3932043367/

Relax! It's safer than it looks!

As every parent knows it can be a high adrenaline rollercoaster ride when your little ones start moving about with the aid of wheels in one form or another. It's the parents who's hearts are lurching as their offspring happily hurtle away oblivious of the impending crashes and tumbles that seem all too likely to Mum and Dad.

It is great to see them rushing off, gaining confidence, skills and having fun. That doesn't stop you feeling nervous though, and if we're not careful our fears as parents can hold back our children as they go for it, or even transfer into anxieties for them that can hold them back from having fun and developing.

So the thing to do is make sure we've done everything we can to give them what they need to grow and develop while minimising the risks to their bodily well being and parents' stress levels! Having gone through a variety of little ones transport types with my two children I found the humble push scooter to be the best bet for their first set of wheels, with them finding it naturally easier to get going with. However not all scooters are equal and some are definitely more appropriate for small learner riders!

A Safer Scooter Designed with Little Learner Riders in Mind

Scooters just seem to be the way many kids prefer to get their first experiences of rolling around on wheels. However, despite their apparent simplicity a basic scooter can be seriously tricky for young kids just getting used to wheels and steering. A regular scooter with just the single front wheel poses a real challenge to the youngster just learning to handle wheels and a sharp turn all too easily locks up the scooter often resulting in a nasty crash.

Enter the min kick scooter. The ingenious design of the mini kick scooter and similar models with two wheels in front really makes riding them so much easier for young children; meaning they have more fun and develop their confidence and skills more quickly without the set backs of nasty crashes.

Not only do the two wheels aid stability but they also incorporate a clever steering mechanism which tilts the wheels in the direction the rider leans. Kids seem to find this steering much more intuitive when they first starting handling vehicles and this in turn helps them as they progress to bicycles.

If your three year old is ready for their first set of wheels I would definitely recommend you try and get a mini kick scooter or similar, in the UK for instance the iScoot mini scooter is a good alternative. Then find yourself a nice quite smooth surfaced area for them to practice and pretty soon you'll be jogging to keep up! Another great thing about these scooters is the way the handle bar extends with an impressive range of heights, meaning as your child grows their scooter can stretch to fit them! In all probability they'll get several years of use out of their first scooter before they outgrow it!

Learning Skills to move on to Bicycles and more!

Not only do the two wheels aid stability but they also incorporate a clever steering mechanism which tilts the wheels in the direction the rider leans. Kids seem to find this steering much more intuitive when they are first starting to ride. It is also a lot safer than a simple turning steering system which young children can often really struggle with. The tiny wheel on a traditional scooter is far too easy to over steer, resulting in a sudden lock up and a young rider pitched forward onto the ground. Ouch! Yes, tumbles are all part of the learning experience, but putting a novice on a scooter that is just too hard for them only risks battering their confidence. The two front wheels on a min kick type scooter make for a much safer and happier riding experience for little kids.

The way these scooters encourage riders to be conscious of their balance and body weight really sets them up for success too when they come to try riding a bicycle and in fact many other sports and physical activities where a natural sense of balance helps.

If your three year old is ready for their first set of wheels I would definitely recommend you try and get a mini kick scooter or similar, in the UK for instance the iScoot mini scooter is a good alternative. Then find yourself a nice quite smooth surfaced area for them to practice and pretty soon you'll be jogging to keep up! Another great thing about these scooters is the way the handle bar extends with an impressive range of heights, meaning as your child grows their scooter can stretch to fit them! In all probability they'll get several years of use out of their first scooter before they outgrow it!

Here's a mini kick scooter in action.

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    • alexhd57 profile imageAUTHOR

      alexhd57 

      9 years ago

      Thank you. Glad it helped you.

    • MMMoney profile image

      MMMoney 

      9 years ago from Where U Can Make More Money

      very useful info

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