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When Is Somebody Going To Make A Decent Gangster Strategy Game?

Updated on August 11, 2011

I love gangster films and TV shows. Despite the fact that these people are utterly abhorrent in real life, a good gangster narrative can touch on so many different themes of power, loyalty and ultimately, betrayal. While none of these may be particularly edifying the power politics of gangsterism can make for great cinema and great television.

I also love computer games, or good ones at least. I especially like strategy games, which give you the ability to shape a world or worlds. On paper at least, gangsters and strategy games could be a really good match, a mix of business simulation and strategy violence.

However, the fact is that though there have been great books about gangsters, great TV shows about gangsters, great movies about gangsters and even great computer games about gangster life in the form of the GTA series, there has never been a good gangster strategy game, one that lets you take the reins of power and forge your own way in a city gone bad.

There have been several games that have tried over the years to mix the strategy genre with a gangster theme with varying levels of success. Here is a run-down of some of these.

Constructor Street Wars (1999): This game was released as Mob Wars in America and as the title suggests, is the quasi-sequel to the 1997 game Constructor. This is definitely the best strategy game with a gangster theme, however it veers strongly towards a comic setup rather than a realistic one, with ghosts, priests and maniacs all part of your arsenal of destruction.

This emphasis on ‘wackiness’ does not stop it being a good game (though it has its faults) but it does stop it from being a realistic gangster strategy experience. This is a shame as many of the fundamentals – recruiting, setting up illegal businesses and bribing cops – are here. Unfortunately, Street Wars never lets you forget that you are playing a game and the gangster theme always comes second to the overall game mechanics.

Gangsters (1998) / Gangsters 2 (2001): The original Gangsters was a reasonably successful strategy game focussing on prohibition America. It had a fairly detailed business model but was unfortunately hamstrung by a terrible game engine which effectively divorced you from playing through the action (instead you were relegated to giving orders on a weekly basis).

Gangsters 2 improved on this slightly by adding a fairly clunky but definitely superior real-time game engine. Unfortunately the cost of this was a move to a highly simplified territory and business model. Even worse, the game was straightjacketed by a mission system that followed a highly improbable and tedious storyline when a sandbox mode would have been infinitely more preferable.

Gangland (2004): Another prohibition-era game, Gangland seemingly decided to go the Gangsters 2 route, with a clunky game engine (featuring truly awful car/driving mechanics) and a tedious, cliché storyline. Once again, the exclusion of a decent sandbox game effectively ruined this game’s chances of getting played for any length of time.

Crooked Money (2007?): A lesser known game by indie developer Maxima Games. This one is interesting as it lets you take on the role of a small time criminal. You can pickpocket, extort or sell drugs, all the while trying to avoid the long arm of the law or the rough justice of other gangsters.

While a little rough around the edges, the engine is quite flexible and allows for a fair amount of choice, though it is not for those inclined towards top-end graphics (you are represented on the screen by a dot!). You can, for example, work a normal job using the basic game mechanics, gaining experience and money.

However, this game lacks a serious amount of depth and seems to have overlooked some basic tricks which would have made it much better. For example, you cannot extort pubs and restaurants, you cannot own any buildings and you cannot hire your own gangsters to defend and work your turf.

The world is still waiting for the definitive gangster strategy game (or, at least, I am!), and from the looks of things will be waiting a while yet. One promising game, Urban Empires, has been in the pipeline forever and there are few game studios clamouring to make this kind of game.

Partly this is because of the controversial nature of the subject matter. It is notable that all of the above games except Crooked Money are set in 1930’s America. At the moment no studios seem willing to tackle the modern world of gangsterism, or at least the business end of selling drugs, sex and guns rather than just the cartoon violence and improbable scenarios of the GTA series and its imitators. As always, the gauntlet will fall to independent developers with the guts and the vision to create something special. Let’s hope they do it soon.

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    • profile image

      Sam 

      5 years ago

      david 5 the game you are thinking about is called Legal Crime

    • profile image

      David 

      6 years ago

      There was a game I played at a friends house around 1997 - I think it was called 'Extortion' but I've googled it and found nothing.

      It was an isometric game - you intimidated shops until they caved in, and then you could convert them to bootlegs, speakeasies etc. Ofcourse - if you're weren't intimidating enough, they'd call the cops.

      Anyone know what the game was?

    • profile image

      TORN City 

      6 years ago

      You might want to try Torn City. It is a text-based gangster game. It has been out for some time but is still very stable because it is well maintained and has an active community.

      Here is the link: http://www.torn.com/1615578

      Please keep my ID for referral. Thanks!

    • profile image

      Dionusos 

      6 years ago

      only total war could offer us a descent gangster / mafia / familia strategy game. I wish based on "gangsters".

    • profile image

      Mob Rule 

      7 years ago

      To Drayzer: You're thinking of "Mob Rule":

      http://www.gamespot.com/pc/strategy/mobrule/index....

    • profile image

      Josh 

      7 years ago

      You guys should definitely try Mob Rule. Very similar to the Gangsters series with less emphasis on the people in your gang and more on the management area.

    • Pseudonymous profile imageAUTHOR

      Pseudonymous 

      8 years ago

      Thanks for the comments guys. Toddy, I've only played the first Godfather (and enjoyed it) but haven't got around to playing the second yet (a lot of other games on the list and less and less time these days!)

      Koffein, yes I've played Mafia and while it's a great game there is no strategy element that I can remember. I believe the new one is similar (I've only played the demo) insofar as it's very linear and no/very little strategy element.

    • profile image

      Koffein 

      8 years ago

      You should take a look at the game "Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven" (2002). It´s mainly a 3rd person shooter, but has a very interesting (linear) storyline settled in the 1930s.

    • profile image

      drayzer 

      8 years ago

      Does anyone here can remember some gangster strategy game that came out around same time as "Gangsters" but it was kinda silly mobster game. It was mobster simulation but kinda made to look funnier. Camera was in bird-eye view

    • profile image

      wannabe 

      8 years ago

      spent many an hour playing the original gangsters game, and was sadly disseminated in #2. As well could never get in to Mob wars, ( i thought it was called mobsters.) I thought gangsters was by far the best of the three. They had the basic principals right there, and I would desperately like to see a remake with the same strategy yet better graphics and more control on the real time side.

    • profile image

      Toddy 

      8 years ago

      @Pseudonymous In 'Gangsters', though you are correct in saying that you had to set out your orders at the beginning of each week, you could then 'hijack' those orders mid-week, and play the game as a real-time strategy instead. I do agree though, that the sequel sadly lacked the gameplay of the original game.

      Have you tried the latest Godfather game? not strictly a strategy game, more of a 3rd-person-shooter - although your tactical planning can make the game much easier.

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