ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Why Mass Effect 1 is Better Than Mass Effect 2

Updated on September 14, 2013
Most people think the second one is better...  I don't think so.
Most people think the second one is better... I don't think so.

Ask anyone for a list of the best Role-Playing Games (RPGs) released for the Xbox 360, and the Mass Effect series will stand at the apex of that list. In the game, players assume the role of Commander Shepherd to save the galaxy from a race of ancient machines called the Reapers. During his or her adventures, Shepherd must "shepherd" different races of aliens and unique humans together to create a team capable of withstanding anything their gargantuan and resourceful foes can throw at them. Created by the same brain-tank that began the popular Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (KotOR) series, Mass Effect continues the great RPG tradition with an abundance of side quests, a diversity of aliens to interact with, engaging characters, a deep, enriching backstory, and a shooter-rpg battle system that never grows stale. Include the Paragon/Rebel morality system, the ability to customize the hero's appearance, and the end of the silent protagonist, and you have one of the greatest RPGs series in the East and West. Unfortunately, like all great games with a great beginning, and eerily similar to the KotOR series where Bioware made its foothold, the sequel fails to match its predecessor. Mass Effect 2 is definitely an excellent game, but misses several key qualities that give Mass Effect higher replay value.

Poor engineers.  All of their out-of-combat skills are gone.  Oh well, at least they can now send a useless drone your enemy's way.
Poor engineers. All of their out-of-combat skills are gone. Oh well, at least they can now send a useless drone your enemy's way. | Source

The Limiting of Skills and Battle Powers

Turn-based battle systems becoming nonexistent, upgrading skills separates RPGs from contemporary action games. Players must use the points they gather from leveling-up to enable hacking skills, stronger shields for their Mako tank, for stronger Paragon/Rebel persuasion options, and to deliver more destructive attacks with their weapons. An RPG just isn't about physical player construction, but also about precision skillpoint allocation to enable the gamer to produce a character whom specifically addresses the gamer's needs and wants. In Mass Effect 2, the ability to customize greatly diminishes. Shepherd can now hack into any terminal to gain the treasures or secrets hidden, no matter what class one chooses. The multitude of battle and tech skills presented, which allowed allowed for greater battle options, are also absent. The ability to halt all those annoying Asari biotics? Forget it. The option to overload an enemy weapon to stop rounds from unloading on the player? Gone. The power to upgrade a gun skill to go into a badass shooting frenzy? Not on your life. With the limiting of the variety of skills to upgrade and the limiting of battle powers available in combat, Mass Effect 2 feels more like a shooter with upgradable elements than a RPG with a shooter battle system.

Lower Interactivity with the World

The biggest draw and point of any video game is how the player interacts with the game world, a factor that proceeds story, setting, music, or any other aspect, and Mass Effect astounds by enabling players to interact with a game galaxy rather than just a world. In the series' first sequel, the player can scan planets for natural resources, send probes to gather those resources for upgrades, and if an anomaly is detected, venture to a base on that planet and deliver some butt-kicking. At first glance, this sounds great, but the first game gave the gamer more. One could actually travel on these planets using an all-terrain vehicle, a Mako, find the resources on the planet, enemy bases, objects of interest to the Mass Effect universe, an enemy base, or even a chance encounter with monsters that make tremors resemble pet worms. Braving the planets' snowstorms, volcanic craters, and other worldly hazards made the experience of searching for new worlds exciting and engaging, rather than monotonous and boring as the presented planet probing in the oddly applauded sequel.

Beautiful extraterrestrial scenery  is so last year.  This time, we'll make the player scan planets from orbit for hours, because, that's so much more fun.
Beautiful extraterrestrial scenery is so last year. This time, we'll make the player scan planets from orbit for hours, because, that's so much more fun. | Source
A bunch of square boxes in the middle of the jungle... I wonder what's going to happen next?
A bunch of square boxes in the middle of the jungle... I wonder what's going to happen next?

The Unnatural Terrain

The suspension of disbelief in level design becomes weaker in Mass Effect 2. Contradictory to reality, the gamer knows most objects within a video game have a purpose: trees that break to add realism, boxes and canisters that explode to harm an opponent, tall walls which stretch to keep the player-character confined in the sandbox. Mass Effect 2 does well on its level design within the RPG genre, yet the cover provided to defend from enemy attacks appears too often, making the game appear more artificial than it should be. Rocks and boxes lying before the player in conveniently carved rectangles, the player can always see the signs of an impending gunfight. In the first game, jagged rocks, deteriorating structures, and boulders gave protection for outside terrain, while metal partitions and balcony ledges gave cover for inside areas. Sometimes, there was no cover at all. With a level design indicating when enemies will strike, Mass Effect 2 harms its suspension of disbelief greater than its predecessor.

To Conclude

Mass Effect 2 compares to the younger sibling everyone spoils despite its faults. The much praised sequel reduced the upgradable skills and variety of battle powers present in ME1, making it less of an RPG and more of a shooter that has character levels. The planet probing does a poor job in replacing the planet venturing when it comes to interactivity. Finally, the level designs with cookie-cutter cover protection remind the player too often that programmers are the gods of their gaming world. Don't misjudge the writer: Mass Effect 2 is a solid game. More interesting NPCs grace the player's presence, within their own party and out of it, the combat system runs smoother, the quick-time Paragon/Rebel options add spice to the cut scenes, and, of course, seeing the decisions you chose in game one transition to game two is revolutionary. Unfortunately, RPG fans will find themselves more disconnected from the sequel than the original. Just as survival/horror fans complained how the Resident Evil series traveled too far from its roots, Bioware must remember its RPG roots to keep producing games which stand as the epitome of the genre.

Remember Bioware, go too far and old Shepherd might end up like Chris:  Drunk, perpetually pissed, and with repressed memories from lackluster game sales.
Remember Bioware, go too far and old Shepherd might end up like Chris: Drunk, perpetually pissed, and with repressed memories from lackluster game sales.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Zeron87 profile imageAUTHOR

      Zeron87 

      3 years ago

      Thanks for the comment ^_^. I can agree 2 is better... If you prefer Shooters over Rpgs.

    • profile image

      ya no 

      3 years ago

      nope 2 is better.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)