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10 Moves in Fighting Games That Would Probably Kill You

Updated on October 15, 2014

10 Moves in Fighting Games That Would Probably Kill You

Fighting games are over the top affairs with many whacky and zany special moves. While performing a special move could remove some health from your computerized foe, doing these things in real life could have devastating consequences. Lets look at 10 moves in fighting games that would probably kill you.

10. Guile's "Flash Kick"
Guile from Street Fighter 2 is an All-American machine. A move Guile can perform is the Flash Kick. The Flash Kick sees Guile flip in the air, kicking his legs out so fast that it creates dagger like vibrations in the air. If Guile nailed you with a Flash Kick in real life, those vibrations would likely be strong enough to rip your torso in half. Ouch.

The fact that Guile was only given 2 special moves shows how powerful the Flash Kick really is. Guile's other move, the "Sonic Boom", would also be a pretty nasty move to take in real life. The Flash Kick though must be more devastating, seeing as it can put ripples in the atmosphere!

The Flash Kick was recreated in the dire Street Fighter live action movie, however this was all kick and no flash. Jean Claude Van Damme, as good as he is, could not do it justice.

9. Terry Bogard's "Power Wave"
From Fatal Fury, Terry Bogard is the cap-wearing poster boy and all around nice guy. His Power Wave would probably set your legs on fire though, as he punches the floor to create a flame that travels along the ground.

You could try to jump over it, but the height of the incoming fire would make it tricky. Either way, you are going to get burned up.

Just imagine it, a cap-sporting pretty boy slaps the ground and causes some serious heat to be thrown in your direction. Unless you show up to fights with a bucket of water or a fire extinguisher, consider yourself up the creek without a paddle.

8. Sub Zero's "Freeze"
Although Sub Zero can rip out your spine (it is Mortal Kombat after all), you would likely die beforehand from his freeze projectile.

Using this move in the game will freeze you in the spot and let ol' Subby get in a free hit, but in real life anything that freezes the human body this quick would be lethal. It is pretty much instant freeze, turning you into a ice statue with nowhere to go. Even if you survived the freeze, you would probably break in half once Sub Zero hits you with a devastating roundhouse kick.

Sub Zero would be handy to have around though for parties, ice cold drinks all night.

7. Blanka's "Electric Thunder"
Mashing on the punch buttons will generate high-priority electric attacks from Blanka in Street Fighter 2. Blanka rapidly crouches and conducts several thousand volts of electricity through his body, zapping opponents that come in contact. Blanka apparently got this power because some electric eels decided to ambush him as a youngster, and now he wants to share it with his enemies.

This would surely electrocute any living being that touches him to death. One could only imagine the insane pain of having thousands of volts being forced through the veins.

At least he would never need to pay an electricity bill though. Also, Marty McFly and Doc would have found this guy useful.

6. Vega's "Flying Barcelona Attack"
Vega is known not only for his obsession with beauty, but also for the claw he wields and his unique fighting techniques.

Another move from Street Fighter 2, Vega jumps off a wall and performs a free fall, aiming his deadly claw right into the opponent's cranium. If this isn't bad enough, he then whips his arms outwards after impact. This should be enough to rip half of your head open.

For someone obsessed with beauty, Vega also seems pretty obsessed with disfiguring his opponents. The Flying Barcelona Attack would be devastating enough to kill. If this isn't bad enough, Vega can also climb up a steel cage (akin to WWE superstars) to get some extra height before performing the move.


5. Nightwolf's "Hatchet Uppercut"
Another from the Mortal Kombat series, this one does not need much description.

Nightwolf is an Apache warrior who is defending the Earth Realm. How he does this? He carries a trusty magical bow and an even trustier magical hatchet.

The guy produces a hatchet from his pocket, and uppercut's his foe into the air. No body part is off limits; Nightwolf will raise the hatchet from the ground and into he air, slicing his opponent in the process.

Needless to say, this would be pretty grim to see in real life. It would also be pretty interesting to see someone produce a full sized hatched from their pocket in real life.


4. Aigis' "Pandora Missile Launcher "
From Persona 4, this one is just mental.

Aigis appears as an android with short, blond hair and dark blue eyes. As an android, Aigis probably has quite an arsenal programmed into her body. From guns to grenade launchers.... to missile launchers. Serious?

Aigis produces a missile launcher, of all things, and blasts her opponents to do some nice damage. Imagine this in real life, it would probably do some "nice damage" to a whole country. Don't try this one at home. Devastation of missiles can be seen on youtube.

3. Ryu and Ken's "Hadouken"
The standard in fighting game moves, the Hadouken fireball is now legendary.

Takashi Nishiyama, the creator of Street Fighter, credits the 1970s anime Space Battleship Yamato and a missile called the Hadouho as the origin of Hadouken. A fireball named after a missile on a spaceship is nothing to take lightly.

Ryu's variation of the move, the Shinku-Hadouken, is even more deadly. Depending on the game, this fireball can be a barrage of energy or a mega fireball the size of a building. Needless to say, if you see a guy charging up a fireball in his hands you better run.

2. Scorpion's "Spear"
GET OVER HERE!!

Scorpion likes to throw daggers tied to ropes at his opponents. The dagger will stick in the opponents throat, and the character will be dragged quickly over to Scorpion.

If this was performed in real life, your throat would likely fall out (if even possible). Why the move is called the "Spear" is anyone's guess though. It's not a spear, it's a dagger on a rope.

The Mortal Kombat movie featured the Spear, however the dagger was a living creature with eyes and a mouth. It also comes from Scorpion's palms, which is quite gross in it's own right.

Still, the Spear is just as iconic as the Hadouken. Just avoid yellow ninjas and you should be fine.

1. Akuma's "Misogi"
This is insane.
Akuma (from the Street Fighter series) will jump into the air and come down at breakneck speed, grabbing his opponents head and crashing it hard into the ground. So hard, in fact, that the earth begins to open up and the flames of hell can be seen through the cracks.

Imagine some guy in a karate outfit performing this at your local leisure center. Terrifying stuff. Anyone who can show you what hell looks like is someone who should probably be avoided. If the head trauma doesn't kill you, the visuals of hell would surely drive you insane.

Video Game Special Moves

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    • CatherineGiordano profile image

      Catherine Giordano 

      3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      I'm not a gamer, but enjoyed reading about the fantastical killer moves.

    • CoopCouple profile image

      Cory 

      3 years ago from United States

      Great article. As for Scorpion, I would imagine that if his "spear" hit you anywhere in the body, it would just rip out a chunk of flesh, instead of pulling the opponent closer. Ah, the magic of video games.

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