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Cinnamon, Blood Sugar and Anti-oxydants

Updated on January 17, 2011
Cinnamon
Cinnamon | Source

Many people love the distinctive flavor and aroma of cinnamon. And, this fragrant spice can do much more than you may have imagined. Cinnamon could be described as a natural powerhouse that is filled with anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, and blood sugar-lowering abilities.

For instance, cinnamon taken from the inner bark of tropical trees is also a powerful antioxidant!

Actually, cinnamon has one of the highest antioxidant levels of any known spice. There are as many antioxidants in just 1 teaspoon of cinnamon than there are in a full cup of pomegranate juice or 1/2 cup of blueberries.

Cinnamon is rich in natural compounds known as polyphenols. These compounds act like insulin within the body and can help regulate blood sugar levels.

Cinnamon was used to relieve stomach pain and gas, and continues to be used for these types of conditions today. Two cinnamon bark species (Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Cinnamomum cassis) is a tried and true spice (cinnamon bark). Although there is not an abundance of scientific information to support the use of cinnamon for any condition, laboratory studies indicate that cinnamon may be useful in treating diabetes (Type 2) because of cinnamon's blood sugar-lowering effects.

Additionally, cinnamon and its compounds may have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antioxidant properties. These properties have proven to be effective in treating a variety of conditions, such as, cancer or virus infections. Cinnamon has been given GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Items with GRAS designation are considered safe and not restricted.

Dosage:

Adults (over 18 years of age). Although no proven effective medicinal doses for cinnamon has been assigned, it is considered safe taken by mouth short-term (up to six weeks) in dosages up to 6 grams daily. Cinnamon extract capsules containing 250 milligrams can be taken twice a day for up to 12 weeks as an antioxidant, For diabetes, various doses of cinnamon (capsules, powder or extract) can be ingested for four weeks (1-6 grams daily).

Cinnamon and Other Drug Interaction

* As cinnamon may have antibacterial activity, use it cautiously when combining with other antibiotic medications.

* Cinnamon may lower blood sugar levels, however, use caution when using other blood sugar lowering medicines.

* Cinnamon can increase bleeding risks when taken with drugs that are known to increase bleeding. For instance, aspirin, anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil) or naproxen (Naprosyn or Aleve).

* Cinnamon may also enhance the effects of anti-fungals.

* Cinnamon may affect heart rate and caution should be used in people taken heart condition medicines.

* Cinnamon may lower cholesterol, but use cautiously when combining with other cholesterol medications.

* Cinnamon may lower blood pressure.

* Cinnamon may interact with alcohol and other drugs, such as, drugs used to treat Alzheimer's disease, pain relievers, anti-cancer drugs, estrogen, or tetracycline.

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    • Donnacha C profile image

      Donnacha C 6 years ago from Ennis, Co Clare, Republic of Ireland

      wow, great, informative article on this delicious spice.

    • creativeone59 profile image

      benny Faye Douglass 6 years ago from Gold Canyon, Arizona

      Thank you ivori, for this fantastic in formation , thank you for sharingit. Godspeed. creativeone59o

    • ivori profile image
      Author

      Barbara Eisenberg 6 years ago from Titusville

      Thank you, Faye, for your comment. God Bless.

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