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Tips For Completing the 'Couch to 5K' Running Program.

Updated on March 19, 2013
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Introduction.

I recently completed the Couch to 5k running program. I became a graduate of the program on 12/3/2011. After 9 weeks of being on the program, I thought I would take the time to share some tips on how I completed the program. This article is for anyone considering starting the program. It is also for those who have never heard of the program, and might want to try it out. I am not an expert, and the tips I'm going to provide are what helped me get through the program. I'm just simply passing them on to help others. Also remember to consult with your doctor or health care physician before starting any fitness program. Please read on.

What is the Couch to 5k running program?

The Couch to 5k running program(also known as C25K), is a running program designed to get couch potatoes running 5k, or 3 miles on a regular basis. The program lasts 9 weeks in total, and is posted on the website http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml. The program consists of running 3 days a week, with a rest day in between each run. Some people believe the program is only for those who haven't run in years, or have never ran at all. However, this program is for anyone regardless of your level of fitness. I've been running since 2006. Sometime in 2009, I slacked off on my running. Since then it's been a struggle to get back to where I was, so I decided to use this program to help get me back to running regularly. I am also planning on running in my first 5k race next year, so this program has definitely helped me in getting prepared for that. I started out by downloading the podcasts for the program. The website I used for the podcasts was http://www.c25k.com/podcasts.htm. The guy who coaches you through the program is named Robert Ullrey. If you are interested in using the program, you don't have to use the podcasts from this site. There are several sites for downloading the podcasts and apps for using the program. Ok lets get into the tips that I've come up with.

Don't stop running.

What do I mean by this? Well, using this program requires a lot of dedication. Depending on your level of fitness, the first couple of weeks of the program can be fairly easy. They can also be very challenging as well. However, as you progress into the program, the runs will get longer and harder. No matter how hard the runs may seem, continue to run. If you have to slow your runs down to almost briskly walking, do exactly that. This program is about building up your endurance, which brings me to my next tip.

Focus on your stamina, not speed.

A person using this program correctly should average around 10 minutes per mile. However, if you are just starting out running, or have been inactive for years, this may be very difficult to achieve. Don't concentrate on time. Focus on building up your endurance and stamina. If you are running 11, 12, 13, or even 14 minute miles, that is totally fine. As long as you are consistently running, that's all that matters regardless of your pace. As you progress and become better at running, your speed will gradually build.

Breathe however is comfortable for you.

Breathing is another important aspect of running. Most running experts advise runners to breathe in through their noses, and out through their mouths. Many advanced runners breathe in through their noses, and out through their nose. However, many new runners find these methods of breathing difficult, and breathe through their mouths only. If breathing through your mouth is the most comfortable method for you, then do it. Like I mentioned earlier, the idea of this program is to gradually build yourself into a runner. As you become better as a runner, you can focus more on the correct methods of breathing.

Run on different terrains.

This is extremely important if you are planning on running in a 5k race somewhere down the line. If you run in a 5k race, there will most likely be a hill or hills that you will encounter. You wanna make sure your legs are equipped to handle running the hills, so don't just run on a flat surface all the time. This is a tip that I received from someone on the Couch to 5k's Facebook page. If you run on a treadmill regularly, take your runs outside sometimes. If you can become accustomed to running hills, running on flat surfaces will become fairly easy for you. During my training on the program, I had two different places I ran at. One was a flat surface at the local park, and the other was the streets near where I live. The streets had a few incline hill surfaces, so that helped me in my training.

Trust the program.

This is my final tip for those considering the program. When you get into the latter weeks of the program, the runs will become longer and more difficult. It will probably seem difficult to achieve and overcome, but trust the program and more importantly, trust yourself. The running that you do in the earlier weeks will prepare you for the more difficult runs in the coming weeks. The program will not put more on you than your body can handle. If you feel you need to repeat a day or week of the program, do that as well. Being comfortable and confident are two of the most important factors.

Summary.

Using this program has been a journey for me. I almost hated to see it end, but this lady on the C25K's Facebook page told me something that will stick with me. She told me not to be disappointed that I'm done with me program because finishing it is just the beginning of new challenges. I will continue running and getting prepared for my first official 5k race next year. If you remember the tips that I've provided here, it will help guarantee your success. Remember to consult with your doctor or physician if you've been inactive for years before starting any type of fitness program. Thanks for reading.

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    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @SamitaJassi, Thank you very much, and I appreciate you stopping through.

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @stanmurphy, Hello, and thanks for stopping through. It's a very effective program to use. It definitely helped change my life for the better. Yes, it's important to put health warnings in articles like this. You never want to be responsible for someone getting injured or hurt from reading something of this nature. Thanks a lot for reading and leaving your comments. Much appreciated!

    • stanmurphy profile image

      Stan Murphy 

      5 years ago from Kansas

      I have a few friends doing this program because they want to do 5k charity events. I am glad you mentioned consulting your doctor prior to beginning the program because so many people just start a fitness program without thinking about how important it is to check with a health care professional. Awesome hub!

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @FitGadgetReviews, Thank you very much. I also love the fact that these kind of events are for charity, and also help so many people set and achieve their fitness goals. Also, thank you for your service. Best wishes!

    • FitGadgetReviews profile image

      Nick Jerkovich 

      5 years ago from Dayton, OH

      Great hub! We had running programs like this in the military. The great part about being able to do 5k's is the charity events. You can find all kinds of groups that do 5k walk/runs for great causes. Great read.

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @Adam G, Hello sir. Yes your recommendation is welcomed, and I agree 100 percent with you on that. I was lucky that I didn't have to repeat any week, but I've read of people who've had to do exactly that. That is definitely good advice for anyone who needs it. Like I said before, the goal of the program is to gradually get people into running. Thanks a lot for reading, and for leaving your feedback. I appreciate it a lot!

    • profile image

      Adam G 

      5 years ago

      If I might add a recommendation, I suggest that you keep at it, and repeat weeks if you have to. I graduated the 9-week Counch-2-5k in... 12 weeks. Like you said, the later weeks felt impossible for someone like me (265Lbs at the time), but repeating 3 of those weeks allowed me to grow accustomed to pacing myself so that I could complete the run. So while there are many people out there who might be able to do this in the scheduled time, for those who can't, don't give up, and keep trying, and you're gonna get through it.

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @Ruth Lanham, Thank a lot :)

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @LisaMarie724, I'm glad to hear that. Hope it helps get your motivated. Thanks for reading and commenting :)

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @LauraD093, Haha thanks for reading, and it's a good thing that you came across it. It might play a role in motivating you to get moving. Even if it doesn't, I still appreciate your feedback :)

    • LauraD093 profile image

      Laura Tykarski 

      5 years ago from Pittsburgh PA

      Oh my I should't have read this one ...now I really feel as if I have to start moving my butt. Good hub.

    • LisaMarie724 profile image

      Lisa Stover 

      5 years ago from Pittsburgh PA

      This one was made for me, straight from the couch!

    • profile image

      Ruth Lanham 

      5 years ago

      Nice job...thumbs up!

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      5 years ago from Texas

      @My Moments, Thank you very much for the vote up. I appreciate you offering your feedback as well. I started going the 'C25K' program as a well to build my distance back up after a layoff from running. When I began, I was probably running around 10:30 mile times, and now I average around 9:30. The program definitely does work. I personally find it impressive that you're training for a half-marathon. That's really awesome. I'm hoping to run one someday myself. Thanks again for your feedback. I appreciate it :)

    • My Moments profile image

      My Moments 

      5 years ago

      Voted up and useful. The stamina tip is right on point. I have read that beginners usually start out at a 12 minute mile. That was about where I was and I am now up to a 10 minute mile.

      And getting off the treadmill and running outside is critical. I found it much harder to run outside than it was on the treadmill.

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      6 years ago from Texas

      Thank you very much for reading and viewing :)

    • Arren123 profile image

      Arren123 

      6 years ago from UK

      Well done Brad, keep it up, keep on running. Voted up and tweeted :)

    • profile image

      Bunky02 

      6 years ago

      Well done Brad thanks for the tips!

    • profile image

      Xakousti 

      6 years ago

      its great you advised in the beginning and the end to consult with a doctor cause that's so important. that's such a funny title for a run C25K, but its so true for so many of us..LOL what an accomplishment for you and good luck in next years 5K. I got a medal for first place for the girls 5K you know...hehe And would love to start running again one day sooner than later. Thanks for all the useful tips.

    • prospectboy profile imageAUTHOR

      Bradrick H. 

      6 years ago from Texas

      Thank you very much Audrey.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 

      6 years ago from California

      Nice job! Following you here!

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