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How To Stop Cycling Knee Pain.

Updated on June 23, 2014
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Cycling Knee Pain-How I Cured Knee Pain From Cycling

How I cured my cycling knee pain. I had suffered with cycling knee pain all last season. I'd go out on my bike to visit family nearly every day, a ride there and back of about 36 miles. The cycling knee pain while not agonising on these relatively short trips was troubling and would start to manifest itself after about thirty minutes hard riding. During the coursework of my longer end of week rides it more often than not would be bad after 50 miles plus even when not going that fast and would progressively worsen the further I went. Being oblivious to cycling knee problems and causes I just thought the reason behind it was that I hadn't really done much by way of cycling or any real exercise for many a year. I thought getting back on the saddle and knee pain was all par for the course. My reasoning my body was adapting to exercise and once I got stronger it would go away.

Due to circumstances I didn't ride much through the off season except sometimes a thirty mile steady venture out but once the new year started I got back into more serious riding and the medial knee pain came back with a vengeance. On one particular ride after doing some research in to possible causes for my cycling knee pain I tried cycling with my knees much nearer to each other. I'd read this may help alleviate the pain I was experiencing.

I waited for the cycling knee pain to start troubling me once again and then I moved my knees in nearer together until I were frequently brushing the top tube with the inside of my thighs on the up cycle of the pedal revolution. This helped somewhat and the pain while not gone all together was definitely reduced.


Cycling Knee-Correct Seat Height For Cycling

Cycling Knee Pain-Cured

Once I'd done more study and research I came to the conclusion that I also had my saddle far lower than advisable this came as a surprise in fact I have lifted it a mighty 8 centimetres, a substantial increase I am sure you will agree. This came after learning that the distance between the pedal in it's lowest position and the top centre of the saddle, ideally ought to equal your inside leg x 1.09. This is the optimum seat height for the majority of riders. Obviously not all are anatomically equal but if you too are having to deal with the curse of cycling knee pain like I used to have this one time adjustment is definitely worth giving a go hopefully it will help you like it did me.


Cycling Knee-Correct Knee Angle For Cyclists

Cycling Knee-Correct Seat Height

A consequence of setting my seat height correctly is that I now have the right knee position twenty five to thirty degrees when my foot is at the bottom of the pedal stroke in the six o clock position. Due to the fact my saddle had been much lower than the optimum my knee had been flexed too much when pushing through the top of the pedal cycle. This resulted in too much pressure being put on the knee joint causing my cyclist knee pain.

Once I'd made these easy adjustments & gone on many cycle rides over long distance & at maximum hard work I am pleased to announce that my cycling knee pain seems to have been assigned to the history books, Touch wood I hope I have solved the issue once and for all. If you also have cycling knee pain issues I cannot recommend more highly these simple tips to try & correct the issue. Raising your chair may appear uncomfortable at first but you'll soon get used to it. As a bonus I have even increased my speed since doing it, so why not give it a go. Also I'd love to know how you get on, if you take my advice or if you have any experiences with cycling knee pain yourself please share them in the comments section. Kind Regards & best luck!

Comments-Cyclist Knee

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    • wadestar profile imageAUTHOR

      wadestar 

      6 years ago from uk-lincolnshire

      Hope the advice helps. Let us know how you get on, your comments are appreciated.

    • huntnfish profile image

      huntnfish 

      6 years ago from Washington

      I just picked up cycling a few months ago and definitely have had some knee pain during my longer rides. Just last night another cyclist advised that I should raise my seat just a bit, and now after reading your hub I'm convinced. Hopefully this means problem solved. Thanks!

    • wadestar profile imageAUTHOR

      wadestar 

      6 years ago from uk-lincolnshire

      I would definitely advise it for both comfort and performance. Plus prevention is better than cure especially with Cyclists Knee.

      Glad you liked the Hub and thank you for commenting.

    • internpete profile image

      Peter V 

      6 years ago from At the Beach in Florida

      Very useful info. I've been just getting into cycling over the last year and have been loving it. I may have to take a look at my seat height, although it feels pretty good. Great hub!

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