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Nutritional Benefits From Kelp

Updated on August 26, 2017
A Kelp Forest
A Kelp Forest | Source

Nutrients in Kelp

Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, Panthothenic acid, Folate, Vitamin C,E,& K, Calcium, Iron, Copper, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sodium and Zinc. High in sodium.

Health Benefits of Kelp

  • The vitamins and minerals that are in kelp are good for your bones, your skin, your eyes, and your teeth. It also can help with keeping your organs healthy, as well as muscles and kidneys functioning properly.
  • It has been said that kelp is good for stress relief, lowering blood pressure and for preventing heart attacks.
  • Eating kelp and products made with kelp is a great way in which to boost your energy.
  • It stimulates metabolism helping to control body weight.
  • Healthy for liver function.
  • Preventative for osteoporosis.
  • Lowers cholesterol.
  • Is beneficial for the joints and reduces arthritic pain.


What is Kelp and what is Seaweed

Many people think that kelp and seaweed is the same thing. Kelp is specifically from a group called Laminariales, which is a large seaweed, and part of the brown algae group.

Definition according to Webster's Dictionary

Kelp

  1. Any large brown seaweed
  2. A mass of large seaweeds

Seaweed:

  1. a mass or growth of marine plants
  2. a plant growing in the sea; especially : a marine alga (as a kelp)


Pros and Cons of Kelp

Kelp is a natural source of iodine, however consuming too much kelp can lead to iodine toxicity.

In Japan there are less women that have breast cancer and this could be due to having seaweed/kelp in their diet.

Kelp is rich with sodium alginate, which helps to not only protect the body from radiation but will help to also remove it.



Where Kelp and Seaweed Grow in the Sea

Kelp requires nutrient rich water, and will grow in shallow water where the temperatures are below 68 degrees Fahrenheit. It will float in the water as it contains air filled bladders.

Seaweed can grow anywhere from the equator to the poles.

Where can fresh kelp be purchased?

Kelp can be found in most Asian food stores, natural health food stores or purchased online.

Dried kelp and kelp powder can be purchased at most health food stores.



Kelp

Have you ever used or eaten kelp?

See results

Cooking with Kelp

Add kelp to dips, soups, stir fry, salads and sauces.

Kelp noodles require no cooking. Open the bag, rinse and either eat as a snack or add the kelp noodles to any dish you want to.


Kelp Supplements

Whenever adding supplements to your daily diet you should discuss it first with your doctor or health care provider.

Only take the recommended dosage. You can overdose on kelp and could end up with arsenic poisoning.

There is a chance that kelp supplements may interfere with prescription medications causing them not to work as well.

Some people may have an allergic reaction to kelp, which could cause:

  • rapid heartbeat
  • itchy skin
  • swelling of the lips and or tongue
  • diarrhea

Kelp supplements are sold in powder, tablets, capsules and extract.


Kelp Meal

Using kelp meal in your garden will aid in growth and give your plants large and healthy roots. Use as a preventative to fungal problems.

Kelp for Animals

Kelp is healthy to add to your pets' diet. It is good for their digestion health and for their skin and coats. Many people that have livestock will add kelp to their feed.

If you'd like to read more Hub articles by this author please follow the link below.
If you'd like to read more Hub articles by this author please follow the link below. | Source

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    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      12 months ago from Ontario, Canada

      Oh no! Sorry to hear this Nell.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 

      13 months ago from England

      I remember buy some kelp a few years ago, and was all set to use it for cooking when I read that if you have thyroid disease and use thyroxine then its a no no, lol! but I do love the taste!

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Thanks Deb! So glad that kelp helped you.

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Thanks for coming back Audrey, always nice to see you :)

    • profile image

      Deb Welch 

      5 years ago

      A very good informative Hub about Kelp. I used to take Kelp supplements and found that it is a slimmer for thighs especially for saddlebags. I don't know if it is a remedy for everyone but it did work for me. UP

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 

      5 years ago from Idyllwild Ca.

      I came back to read up on this hub. I had forgotten what the benefits were:) Enjoyed just s much the second time. !

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Thanks for stopping by MsDora, and happy you found this useful.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 

      5 years ago from The Caribbean

      I've only known kelp in powder or capsule form. Will certainly look for the noodle. Thank you for sharing such important information.

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Tammy, Thank you :)

    • tammyswallow profile image

      Tammy 

      5 years ago from North Carolina

      Very helpful information here. I have taken kelp for many years. You have done a great job demonstrating all its benefits.

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Sue, Same here. I'm surprised how nice the weather has been so far. Let's keep our fingers crossed. Have a great weekend!

    • profile image

      Sueswan 

      5 years ago

      Not ready for the snow to fly. Maybe we will have a short winter. Wishful thinking. :)

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Sue, Busy but doing well thanks. Are you ready for the snow to fly?

    • profile image

      Sueswan 

      5 years ago

      Hi Susan,

      I have never tried Kelp but I should as my metabolism is in need of a boost.

      Voted up and awesome

      Hope you are doing well. :)

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      iamsergell and Steph,

      Thank you both.

    • StephSev108 profile image

      Stephanie Marie Severson 

      5 years ago from Atlanta, GA

      Awesome hub! I just started taking kelp and dulse. Thanks for the info.

    • iamsergell profile image

      Lord Sergell of House Stark 

      5 years ago from Darwin, Australia

      Awesome! Nice hub susan! Very informative.

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Audrey, Packed with all kind of good stuff :) The greeting at the end was easy to make. I took a picture of the butterfly (I got it on some flowers) , inserted it into a word document and add the text. I then used my snipping tool and saved it as a picture.

      Blissful, Thanks for stopping by and for your comments.

    • BlissfulWriter profile image

      BlissfulWriter 

      5 years ago

      Kelp is a good source of iodine, which is not found much naturally in other foods. Iodine is needed for healthy thyroid function. I try to use seaweed or kelp in bone broths.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 

      5 years ago from Idyllwild Ca.

      Wow, Susan! I didn't know about the benefits of kelp. This is just great. Will pass this info along.

      And...I love your "thank you greeting" at the end. How'd you do that? :)

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Nell, I can see why you'd have to stop taking the kelp supplement. Thanks for stopping by and for voting. Always nice to see you.

      Jen, I've seen a few good recipes on YouTube using kelp.

      girishpuri, Thanks so much.

    • girishpuri profile image

      Girish puri 

      5 years ago from NCR , INDIA

      It's great to know so much about kelp, very much useful hub, thanks

    • Jen Card profile image

      Jen Card 

      5 years ago

      Thank you, informative and helpful. I think I will search some recipes to try, using kelp. :)

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 

      5 years ago from England

      Hi Susan, I actually bought some kelp supplements a few years ago, but had to throw them away because I found out that I had an overactive thyroid, so with the iodine tablets thyroxine I wasn't allowed to eat them, but I think it's a great supplement to have, and even better to eat naturally, voted up! nell

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      drbj, Kelp is a type of seaweed and all seaweed is algae. Sorry :)

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 

      5 years ago from south Florida

      Hi, Susan, I had already heard that kelp was a healthy supplement but since I thought it was seaweed I wasn't too interested. Now that you have explained it really is a form of algae, I dunno . . . :)

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      GoodLady, It could have been the kelp. Thanks so much for the votes and for sharing.

    • GoodLady profile image

      Penelope Hart 

      5 years ago from Rome, Italy

      It's good you mentioned to check out using it as a vitamin with your doctor. I remember my sister prescribing me some natural stuff which had kelp in it for something i had wrong with me, but it backfired because I have a thyroid problem which flared up with this natural stuff (in a pill form). Not sure whether it was kelp, (maybe it wasn't because kelp is so so good for you), but something wasn't right.

      Anyway, I just love kelp in food and it is, as you say, so so good for us. Voting. Tweeting! Pinning!

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      RH, That reminds me I really must try your sushi recipe.

    • RealHousewife profile image

      Kelly Umphenour 

      5 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      Never knew so much about kelp! Sounds like I need some! The only kind of seaweed I'm sure I've eaten is the fish paper for sushi! I like that...? Hmm! I feel like I need to go rush out and find some!

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Rolly, Thanks. I like the new profile picture.

      Ruchira, Thanks for stopping by to read this. Daughter of Maat recently wrote an excellent hub on seaweed.

      sweetie, Thanks so much!

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Paula, Thanks. I add kelp to my dogs food and it really does make a difference as far as their coats go.

    • sweetie1 profile image

      sweetie1 

      5 years ago from India

      Very nicely written hub. Even though I have never heard about kelp before but seeing how many health benefits it has, I got interested and I am going to find more about it on net and how to get it as I don't think it is available in India or at least in my city. Voted in the poll and voted it up

    • Ruchira profile image

      Ruchira 

      5 years ago from United States

      Thanks for an interesting hub cause I was always confused with seaweed and kelp. I will look for it in the asian market when I shop again.

    • Rolly A Chabot profile image

      Rolly A Chabot 

      5 years ago from Alberta Canada

      Hi Susan... awesome stuff and the benefits are many... great hub and thank you for sharing this with us...

      Hugs fro Alberta

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 

      5 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Susan....very good and all accurate facts on Kelp. I'm familiar with kelp and did take it at one time, because of needing to increase iodine in my system. But, I also know that using iodized salt is usually sufficient now. You've done an excellent job here, Susan.....first page google work for sure!......UP+++

    • Just Ask Susan profile imageAUTHOR

      Susan Zutautas 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Bill & Carol, Thank you both.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 

      5 years ago from Arizona

      I also thought they were one of the same. This was an interesting hub with lots of good information. Thanks for sharing all. Voting UP

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      5 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for the education; I never knew the difference between kelp and seaweed. I should have, but didn't!

      I have never tasted it, and I'm not sure how eager I am to try. :)

      Great information Susan!

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