ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Life Habits

Updated on April 22, 2015
Human Mind.
Human Mind. | Source

Getting Things Done

"Getting Things Done," a book written by David Allen, emphasizes that people cannot focus on bigger goals unless they are able to accomplish their tasks on a day-to-day basis. He proposes development of a system that defines and clarifies a regular day, inclusive of work and personal time, to help reduce clutter in the mind and focus on larger things. The ideal situation is where a person has created enough space to make his mind as clear as 'water.' This will help develop perspectives on the following 'six horizons of focus.'

1. Current projects.

2. Current actions.

3. Responsibility areas.

4. Short-term goals between 1 to 3 years.

5. Long-term goals between 3 to 5 years.

6. Life goals beyond 5 years.

Allen suggests a weekly review of the various levels, and reworking priorities or framing them based on perspectives obtained from such reviews. This will lead to happiness and balance in life where goals are achievable in real time, and the mind is set free to pursue things that are of interest to an individual. The essence of "Getting Things Done" is to record goals and tasks out of the mind in an external mode, say a diary, and subsequently breaking them into time management segments. This allows focusing action on tasks instead of having the mind recall them at intervals to assess and rework strategies on achieving them.


Different Minds. Source Wikimedia Commons, Nevit Dilmen
Different Minds. Source Wikimedia Commons, Nevit Dilmen

“A man who can't bear to share his habits is a man who needs to quit them.”

― Stephen King, The Dark Tower

Create Daily and Weekly Routines

While the above proposal sounds ideal where you are virtually ready for anything, it can indeed get chaotic at times. To avoid this from happening, a good way is to create daily and weekly routines. These routines will help you at being more productive, like Allen suggests in his book, and will help you to accomplish more and live an easier life in happiness and harmony. It will give your day, week, month, and year a calmer and orderly feeling. It will also make your workday and personal time simpler, since your day will no longer be complicated and chaotic because you have already planned out everything well in advance.

You can start this by grouping tasks of a similar nature together and processing them in batches. This way, you are going to be sure about doing things that you absolutely need to do. You are then able to control your day better instead of being at the mercy of a chaotic schedule. If you have a routine in place, you can always start refusing situations that are unwarranted and undesirable. For instance, your set daily routine may not allow a friend to walk in to your office for a chat over a cup of tea. Instead, if you are able to set a time aside for your friends, say in the evening, then you neither interfere with your schedule nor would you neglect valued relationships.

“The chains of habit are too weak to be felt until they are too strong to be broken.”

― Samuel Johnson

Establish Control Over The Way You Live

You need to establish control over the way you live, set some life habits and routines, and try your level best to follow them.

1. Tasks that are related to your work.

You need to list down things that need to be completed in your workday. This can extend to weekly and annual reviews on your progress of accomplishing these tasks. These can be as minor as checking your inbox and deleting unnecessary mails, or as important as preparing for the annual conference a few months down the line with a time set aside each day for making your presentation.

2. Tasks that are of personal nature.

Just like your workday tasks and goals, you can start planning your personal time in a similar way. These may include life habits like yoga, exercise, meditation, doing chores, reading etc. The time you set aside for doing these activities need to be incorporated into your daily routine so that that time is not interfered with by any other activity. Just like you check your mails as soon as you get into the office, you can start your day with meditation followed by yoga and subsequently other activities.

3. Start processing in batches.

Similar to what David Allen has suggested in his book, write down your daily tasks on a piece of paper or feed them into your computer. Once you have done that and rid your mind of the clutter, you can focus on to larger things or things that have always interested you but you never had the time. The smaller or significant jobs that you have listed down can be processed together. Say if you need to go to the bank, visit a dealer, meet a client, and then proceed for a lunch appointment, and all these activities fall on the same route, you can think of doing all these together one after the other. Similarly, at home if you have to mow the lawn on Sundays, take your dog out for a walk, go to the grocery store for your weekly purchases, you can also batch process these tasks together.

4. Make daily, weekly, and annual lists.

Once you know what are the daily, monthly and annual tasks, more than half the job is already done. You simply now need to browse your list to see jobs that need to be done, and start doing them. The most important part is to practice sticking to the list. It may be difficult during the initial stages, but try your level best to stick to your scheduled tasks.

“Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.”

― Jim Ryun

"Fade Away" by Miguel Virkkunen Carvalho from Lahti, Finland - Fade AwayUploaded by Markos90. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fade_Away.jpg#/media/File:Fade_Away.jpg
"Fade Away" by Miguel Virkkunen Carvalho from Lahti, Finland - Fade AwayUploaded by Markos90. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fade_Away.jpg#/media/File:Fade_Away.jpg | Source

You are going to see a world of difference once you have incorporated and established these life habits. You will find yourself more productive, will be accomplishing more, and will live an easier life in happiness with a healthier body and mind. Remember that having a weekly or daily schedule is never monotonous or repetitive. You mind and body are going to respond proactively to give more clarity to your thoughts, you will start feeling more energetic, and over time will develop a feeling of well-being. Always remember that top athletes in the world are successful because they follow strict daily schedules, as do successful businessmen, politicians, musicians, and nearly everyone else with success set in their mind.

“Good habits are worth being fanatical about.”

― John Irving

Take Control Of Your Life

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Dip Mtra profile imageAUTHOR

      Dip Mtra 

      3 years ago from World Citizen

      Thanks Dana for stopping by to read this. It's difficult to change schedules that we have grown accustomed to over the years, but if we can implement some small changes, things should work out easier.

      Thanks again.

    • Dana Tate profile image

      Dana Tate 

      3 years ago from LOS ANGELES

      Lately I. have been feeling overwhelmed because I have been trying to do to many things at one time. The funny thing is nothing is being done and I have been feeling anxious. I have recently. Come to the conclusion to take one thing at a time. Sometimes we can be our worst enemy.

    • Dip Mtra profile imageAUTHOR

      Dip Mtra 

      3 years ago from World Citizen

      Thanks Manatita.

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 

      3 years ago from london

      Interesting and useful. I know of many that this well-considered approach will work and has worked for. Nice Hub.

    • Dip Mtra profile imageAUTHOR

      Dip Mtra 

      3 years ago from World Citizen

      Thanks Genna for stopping by. It's great to know that you liked the hub.

    • Dip Mtra profile imageAUTHOR

      Dip Mtra 

      3 years ago from World Citizen

      Thanks Phyllis for reading this. I guess we can set goals if we can create space in our mind. A good way of doing that is to write down things instead of having the mind to work on checking what has been accomplished. This, way, with more space in our hard disk, we can go about setting goals easily.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 

      3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      “The ideal situation is where a person has created enough space to make his mind as clear as 'water.'” This IS ideal…and the steps outlined are very helpful. I agree with John (Jodah), in that I might use several “to do” aspects in my life sometimes as an excuse to ignore the other. Thank you for this fascinating article.

    • Phyllis Doyle profile image

      Phyllis Doyle Burns 

      3 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

      Hi Dip. For years I avoided setting goals - I thought it was not the way for me. However, I have found that setting goals is a huge part of success. Your review on Life Habits is very well done and very useful.

    • Dip Mtra profile imageAUTHOR

      Dip Mtra 

      3 years ago from World Citizen

      Thanks Jodah. I feel storing tasks in an external mode is a great idea at creating hard disk space in the mind, just like we clear junk and increase memory in drives in our computer.

    • Dip Mtra profile imageAUTHOR

      Dip Mtra 

      3 years ago from World Citizen

      Thanks Jodah. I feel storing tasks in an external mode is a great idea at creating hard disk space in the mind, just like we clear junk and increase memory in drives in our computer.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Hi dipmtra, I really need to put this advice into action. I have big jobs I really need to do but keep putting them off and concentrating on all my small daily jobs. I use them as an excuse for not tackling the big jobs. Writing everything down and grouping things I think would make a big difference. Thank you for sharing this good advice.

    • Dip Mtra profile imageAUTHOR

      Dip Mtra 

      3 years ago from World Citizen

      Thanks Flourish. Smaller daily goals are also equally relevant, since these tend to clutter the mind more tan long-term goals. I feel so, though I may be wrong.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      3 years ago from USA

      Large goals keep me motivated, and I find that breaking those down into manageable chunks (sub-goals, action items) is a path for success.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)