ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

MicroBirth documentary - How healthy will your children be?

Updated on September 20, 2014
LongTimeMother profile image

With her children's ages spanning 22 years, LongTimeMother has 40 years experience in parenting - including home schooling and foster care.

Source

I have a daughter with Multiple Sclerosis, just one of the non-communicable diseases currently being attributed to the circumstances of a child's birth.

A new documentary, partly funded by an Indiegogo funding campaign, called MICROBIRTH has been completed and is launched worldwide today. (September 20, 2014). It presents evidence that will change the way we all view childbirth.

Many doctors and health professionals participated in filming. The conclusion is that a child's best hope for avoiding many of the non-communicable diseases on the rise in today's world comes from a natural birth, immediately followed by skin to skin contact with the mother, and prolonged breast-feeding.

Without those elements, the child's immune system is seriously compromised.

The MICROBIRTH documentary questions if the routine use of intervention in child birth could raise the chance of serious disease in later life ... and reveals how we are born can affect our long-term health.

Every adult should watch this video

The Indiegogo campaign video (above) reveals what the documentary is about - and gives an insight into who is interviewed in the documentary.

No need to donate to the fundraising campaign. The film has been finished, and is currently being released worldwide.

All that remains now is to spread the word so that people can understand the issues, and take steps to protect their children's long term health. Plus those of us who have already been touched by chronic disease can hopefully receive help as we try to understand how to heal.


My child's birth and compromised immune system

My daughter was asked to appear on a panel alongside health professionals at one of the premiere screenings in Australia to answer questions regarding her own health issues.

She had already made the link between the circumstances of her birth and her compromised immune system - and taken active steps to improve her gut health (and therefore her immune system) - and her seemingly miraculous recovery has attracted a great deal of local attention.

In the three years since she was first diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, she has had no more than four months between episodes. She lost her ability to balance and walk, and she lost her vision. By January 2014 she was unable to cope with daily tasks, and was helped by a full-time carer.

Her MRI scans showed such extensive damage to her brain and spine that neurologists gave her no hope for improvement.

Yet she somehow managed to prove them wrong. She walks again, she sees again, she lives an independent life without a carer, and she's even been given her driver's license back. Nobody (except my daughter and I) believed that was possible.

I am very proud of her. And I am greatly relieved that a documentary has been made to explain to others what it took my daughter years to discover (with no help from her doctors.) My daughter's journey and personal research led her to suspect her gut held the key to her recovery.


Understanding the role of Gut Health

Minding My Mitochondria 2nd Edition: How I overcame secondary progressive  multiple sclerosis (MS) and got out of my  wheelchair.
Minding My Mitochondria 2nd Edition: How I overcame secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) and got out of my wheelchair.

We bought this book and added the dietary changes to my daughter's care. (It was not her only action, but we believe it helped.)

 

What causes chronic disease?

The fact that approximately 85% of our immune system is in our gut lining is a well-kept secret. Once we were aware of that, her focus became restoring the appropriate balance of gut flora and fauna.

And along the way, she began to suspect the circumstances of her birth may have been the underlying cause of the disease that struck her in her 30s. She quizzed me at length.

Because she was born in the 1970s at a time when unmarried mothers were under pressure to give their babies up for adoption, I was not allowed to see or touch my baby when she was born. The hospital gave me medication to stop milk production. (She knew all this.)

It took me about four days to have her returned to me, and I did try to feed her, but she was denied the initial skin to skin contact with me, she did not receive colostrum and breast feeding within hours of being born, and she was mainly bottle-fed.

With no understanding of how vital these issues were at the time of her birth, I failed to effectively kick-start my baby's immune system and provide long-term protection against chronic diseases. I accept I probably (though unintentionally) made my daughter sick.


How was your birth?

When you were born, was it a natural vaginal birth, were you given to your mother immediately, and were you breastfed?

See results

Childbirth creating world health crisis

According to the World Health Organisation, non-communicable diseases (including heart disease, asthma, respiratory diseases, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, some cancers and mental disorders) are at epidemic proportions.

The World Economic Forum has predicted that if this epidemic continues, the world's health system will be bankrupt by 2030 (costing $47 trillion) with the potential of a global economic crisis.

An increasing number of medical professionals believe that natural childbirth followed by nature's method of feeding and nurturing babies (ie breast feeding and skin-on-skin touch associated with breast feeding) is the only way to effectively kickstart a baby's immune system and provide life-long protection from NCDs.

Without this natural start to life, children are 'programmed' to fall victim to chronic diseases. And, it seems, this susceptibility could be passed down to future generations.


Essential viewing ...

Learn about your birth - and consider the birth of your children

My daughter has not yet healed her MS. She is managing it. Without doubt, she has succeeded in achieving what neurologists predicted would be beyond reach. However her MRI scans still show extensive damage.

She will continue to try and restore her immune system so it functions effectively, and we hope that her journey may prove helpful to others with similar problems.

We both hope that everyone will pay attention to the messages in the MicroBirth documentary and support all efforts to find answers to the questions that may lead to preventing NCDs.

Please watch the MicroBirth documentary. Don't wait until you are faced with a chronic disease to start looking for answers. We all need to understand how intervention during childbirth could raise our children's chances of serious disease in later life.


© 2014 LongTimeMother

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      This is incredible LTM. I am so glad your daughter is controlling her MS and has defied the odds and doctors. I hope everyone watches the MicroBirth movie. Voted up.

    • Writer Fox profile image

      Writer Fox 2 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      I'm glad to hear that your daughter is doing so much better.

      There's so much about auto-immune diseases that is unknown. The research you present here sounds like a valuable piece to the puzzle. If the causes can be identified then treatments and possible cures can be developed.

      Voted up and useful.

    • LongTimeMother profile image
      Author

      LongTimeMother 2 years ago from Australia

      Hello Jodah. I am hoping the MicroBirth documentary will bring positive changes in health care ... for the sake of all our family members. Best wishes to you and yours.

    • LongTimeMother profile image
      Author

      LongTimeMother 2 years ago from Australia

      Hi Writer Fox. It is unsettling when specialists have conflicting views on what MS actually is - and none of them could tell us what actually causes it. Our journey to her improvement was very lonely and we locked horns with a number of neurologists along the way.

      According to today's specialists, she shouldn't have celebrated her recent birthday. If not dead, she should at least still be bed-ridden and blind. I love that she chose to drive herself to the cinema and watch a movie on her birthday. lol. "Because I can!"

      Will it take a whole new generation of doctors before they accept the vital role of diet and killing pathogens (particularly in the gut) in the treatment of conditions like MS? I hope not. However I'm not convinced that specialists like those we approached for help will be quick to admit they got it wrong.

      There's a few more steps we need to take before we'll know if we can restore my daughter's health permanently, but we have a definite plan and she is growing strong enough to give me great hope for the future. Sadly I can't turn the clock back and relive her birth.

      Future babies will hopefully have their immune systems fully functioning as a result of this documentary. Meanwhile, we all have to pressure doctors and governments to research and implement actions that can heal the millions whose immune systems are currently compromised.

      My brave daughter has made herself a guinea pig in the search for answers. If she manages to succeed, she'll have a great deal to offer those who follow. It is interesting that MicroBirth indicates her experience may have relevance to more than just MS sufferers. It may well be relevant to people suffering other chronic diseases as well.

    • Writer Fox profile image

      Writer Fox 2 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      Please don't blame yourself for your daughter's birth experience. You had no control over the hospital procedures at that time and the best recommendations caring mothers were given were to give birth in a hospital, supervised by the attending physicians and their recommendations.

      The practice of medicine is evolving. Even in the 20th century, bloodletting was a recommended practice – actually removing someone's blood without replacing it!

      I'm so glad to hear that much has been discovered by the MicroBirth group and I sincerely hope that their work might lead to a cure for MS very soon.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

      This is fascinating because I was watching a tv program the other night and it was talking about people with eczema, it said that babies who were taken quickly away at birth for any reason and kept in the hospital don't produce enough gut bacteria that can go on to help with the immune system, this amazed me as I am asthmatic and have eczema, I was in hospital for eight weeks because of complications at birth, evidently you produce different gut bacteria if you are kept in hospital or away from the mother, it wasn't your fault, please don't blame yourself, your daughter is amazing!

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 2 years ago from Florida

      I have a granddaughter who is expecting her first child. She plans on having a home delivery with a midwife. I will share your Hub and video with her. As a mother of four who had natural childbirths and healthy babies, I am very thankful. I hope your daughter continues to do well.

    • darciefrench profile image

      Darcie French 2 years ago from BC Canada

      Two of my children missed out on the immediate contact and prolonged breast feeding - they are definitely not as healthy as my middle child who had a natural birth with all the elements described for good health.

    • LongTimeMother profile image
      Author

      LongTimeMother 2 years ago from Australia

      Thanks to those who commented here over the past few months. Sorry I didn't answer. I couldn't bring myself to reply, for fear I might somehow jinx my daughter's progress.

      She's still doing brilliantly though. :)

      I do hope the conversation continues, here and elsewhere. We need to share our knowledge with others. Thanks.

    Click to Rate This Article