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Best New Cancer Treatments With Viruses and Regenerated Organs

Updated on October 9, 2018
Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty uses her degrees in Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and TKM in research and treatment for public and private health agencies.

Healthy New Organs and Viruses

In the 2010s, we approached a medical milestone featured in science fiction films. This miracle is that of a doctor giving a terminally ill patient a pill that regrows her kidneys in less than one day.

One Central Ohio partnership offered stepping stones to that future through regenerative medicine that uses 3D printing and practical application of a virus.

Construction scaffolding in Cincinnati, Ohio. Bioengineered scaffolding is used for the human body to support new organs that repace cancer-damaged ones..
Construction scaffolding in Cincinnati, Ohio. Bioengineered scaffolding is used for the human body to support new organs that repace cancer-damaged ones.. | Source

Ross Kayuha, CEO of Nanofiber Solutions regenerative medicine company in Columbus, Ohio put together a biomedical firm that quickly developed 3D electrospun polymer scaffolding (matrices) that could be seeded with human stem cells from an adult patient.

The stem cells then grew into the organ needed by the patient, whether that patient was a cancer survivor, accident victim, person born without an organ or with an underdeveloped organ, or some other.

Another solution to some cancers is a herpes virus related to cold sores. Nationwide Children's Hospital receives large grants for use in developing and testing such virus treatments and creates success and longer lives in doing so.

Nanofibers, a virus, and two hospitals are beating cancer.

Growing new tissues from a patient himself.
Growing new tissues from a patient himself. | Source

Biological Scaffolding That Dissolves

Construction scaffolding holds workers and materials in place as it stands close to a building project.This concept can be used in medicine as well.

Bioengineered scaffolding supports stem cells as they grow into a new organ.

At that point, the scaffolding can disintegrate and disappear, if that option were chosen. A similar process has been used in surgeries for some time, involving stitches and calcium-based bone-holding screws that dissolve.

Trachea and adjacent organs of respiration can already be replaced with 3D printed options.
Trachea and adjacent organs of respiration can already be replaced with 3D printed options. | Source

Bioengineered scaffolding supports stem cells as they grow into a new organ.

Progress in Growing Organs

Previously, circa 2011, a senior citizen in his early 70s received a new esophagus made from powdered pig bladder and intestine that had grown around a matrix formed around his cancerous organ. The sugery and the operation of the new esophagus were successful.

As for the trachea,in 2003, reports stated that American doctor Eric M. Genden transplanted an organ formed from the use of cartilage from a donor combined with body tissue from his patient. For this, he received a nomination for a Marcus Prize in Medicine*. He also received the Best Clinical Innovations Award in 2003 from The Academy of Osseointegration and Educator of the Year recognition by Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in NYC, among other awards.

Later, a donor transplant of the complete organ was first done for a woman from the country of Columbia in 2008. In 2011, an artificial trachea was placed surgically for a man from Eritrea at a Swedish hospital.

Nanofiber Solutions offers a trachea grown from a patient's own stem cells, eliminating the possibility of transplant rejection, while decreasing the amount of overall recovery time required. Dr. Jed Johnson of The Ohio State University is Chief Technologic Officer (CTO) and colleague Dr. John Lannutti Is Chief Science Officer. Both physicians have long histories of successful research at OSU.


*It is unclear whether this is the Florence Marcus or the Melvin Marcus Prize, both having medical categories. However, the latter is closely related to cardiovascular health that includes the trachea. In addition, this is the Dr. Genden that performed the first jaw implant in 2006. Head and Neck Surgery is full of medical advances.

The James Cancer Hospital at OSU, partnering with Nationwide Children's Hospital in research. These partners develop individualized therapies for patients, based on DNA.
The James Cancer Hospital at OSU, partnering with Nationwide Children's Hospital in research. These partners develop individualized therapies for patients, based on DNA. | Source

Nanofibers In Medicine and Treatment

The nanofibers used by Ross Kayuha's Columbus company would equal the diameter of a human hair if 200 of these nanofibers were put together.

In 2012, the company was able to build two larynx-trachea combinations for two patients each in Sweden and Russia, designed to be the size that the individual bodies required. By the end of 2013, the new organs were still operating effectively.

Such applications of nanofibers and related materials, drug delivery systems, etc. has given rise to the field of medicine called Nanomedicine. Scientists in this field are conducting important research in such subjects and neural therapies in brain injury. The National Institutes of Health engaged in a 10-year plan beginning in 2005 to initiate new Nanomedical Centers in the USA. By the end of 2013 eight centers were established. The Medical Centers of Excellence program has been expanded to include Nanomedicine Centers.

Electrospinning pulls the nanofibers from a liquid base via the use of a needle/spinneret, much in the same manner as a spider weaves webbing material, providing material for many biomedical applications, according to the NIH at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19076051. For Nanofiber Solutions, that application is growing the human trachea and other internal organs.

The nanofibers can be immediately biodegradable, or they can be built to last for a longer time period.

The next project for Kayuha, et.al. is one in which new intestines will be grown for children at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, under Dr. Gail Bresner. She and Kayuha's group recieved an Ohio Third Frontier Grant for the research and development.

Ross Kayuha is happy to offer a variety of scaffolds to pediatric and adult patients. In fact, he and his team of OSU and other professionals can build them to the classifications of the surgeon. These scaffolds can be degradable, nondegradable, soft and pliable, stiff and strong, elastic or not, or anything in between those points.

Top 10 New Biotech Companies

Biotechnology Industry Organization and National Science Foundation Recommendations

  1. ADMdx
  2. Biodesy
  3. Carmot
  4. CertiChem
  5. Jade Therapeutics
  6. Nano3D Biosciences
  7. Nanofiber Solutions: 3-D Cell Scaffolds & Tissue Engineering. This company is an operating example of how universities like The Ohio State University encourage private company startups.
  8. Parabon Nanolabs
  9. Stemina
  10. Tymora Analytical Operations

This hospital is near a large Ronald McDonald House that houses 71 families of ill children.
This hospital is near a large Ronald McDonald House that houses 71 families of ill children. | Source

Nationwide Children's Hospital Attacks Cancer Cells With Herpes

Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio advertises itself as the largest and most comprehensive pediatric hospital/research institute in America.

This hospital, backed by Nationwide Insurance company, is fortunate to have in its employ Dr. Timothy Cripe, chief of Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplants. he wants to kill cancer cells with a herpes virus. To date, he reports that his team can use the virus to kill cancer cells without causing the virus's disease as a side effect in animal trials in 2013.

Additional top hospitals, including the Mayo Clinic, are researching the effects of other viruses on specific cancers.

Source

Dr. Cripe has found that disabled herpes simplex virus attacks cancer cells to make tumors shrink. In cooperation with Children's Hospital, the The Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital at The Ohio State University operates a viral oncology research program.

The partnerships among these institutions and private companies like Nanofiber Solutions and Nationwide Insurance are miraculous.

Innovators in Cancer Treatment

A
Nanofiber Solutions 1275 Kinnear Rd, Columbus, OH 43212:
1275 Kinnear Road, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212, USA

get directions

B
James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute:
James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

get directions

C
Nationwide Children's Hospital:
Nationwide Childrens Hospital, 700 Childrens Drive, Columbus, OH 43205, USA

get directions

Sources

  • Amolg. Global Nanofiber Materials Market 2018 – Asahi Kasei, Teijin, Toray, Nanofiber Solutions, SNS Nanofiber Technology. Daily World Times; October 1, 2018. dailyworldtimes.com/41795/global-nanofiber-materials-market-2018-asahi-kasei-teijin-toray-nanofiber-solutions-sns-nanofiber-technology/ Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  • James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University. Grand Rounds; 2017, 2018. cancer.osu.edu/research-and-education/education-and-development/grand-rounds Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  • Thomasnet.com. BIO Announces NSF Track Featuring 10 Emerging Biotech COmpanies. news.thomasnet.com/companystory/BIO-Announces-NSF-Track-featuring-10-emerging-biotech-companies-20015361 Retrieved October 28, 2013.
  • Warner, S.G.; Haddad, D.; et.al. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells. Molecular Therapy Oncolytics. 2016; 3: 16013. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27347556 Retrieved October 4, 2018.


© 2013 Patty Inglish MS

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    • Patty Inglish, MS profile imageAUTHOR

      Patty Inglish MS 

      4 years ago from USA. Member of Asgardia, the first space nation, since October 2016

      I hope that happens for your husband soon, Shyron E. Shenko!

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 

      4 years ago from Texas

      Patty, fantastic hub, great information. I look forward to the day when the can grow a new kidney for my hubby.

      Voted-up, UAI, pinned and shared

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile imageAUTHOR

      Patty Inglish MS 

      4 years ago from USA. Member of Asgardia, the first space nation, since October 2016

      Happily, drug companies are not funding any of the Central Ohio work I have mentioned, so I trust the results more fully than those funded by BigPharma. Thanks for your input!

    • Mr Mark Monroe profile image

      Mr Mark Monroe 

      4 years ago from Dover De

      Patty

      Thank you for the article, it is amazing all the advances in cancer research. I have had a 12 year relationship with cancer, consisting of many treatment programs and four surgeries. Of the list of options for my most recent engagement (I have four tumors of which three are non operable) this option was about fifth or sixth down the list. You have to be careful of the advertised successes of some of these procedures. Most of the studies are financed by the pharmaceutical industry and any good press is good for the stocks of the company. The truth of the matter is the human body is still a very mysterious place that science does not fully understand.

      I only say this because, along with my medical professional, I had to do a lot of research to figure out what were the best options for me. Still there is not guarantee for success. I encourage any with cancer who's attending medical professional is only giving them one option, to challenge it and seek out other options.

      Thank you again for the article, I always enjoy reading them.

      Mark

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile imageAUTHOR

      Patty Inglish MS 

      4 years ago from USA. Member of Asgardia, the first space nation, since October 2016

      Hi, MsDora - I feel fortunate to live in a city where these advances are being made. It is easy to attend public lectures and see presntations of the progress - it's very exciting!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 

      4 years ago from The Caribbean

      Shrinking tumors is great but growing new intestines? It all sounds very hopeful. What a long way medicine has come! Thank you for all this interesting information.

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