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Nose Bleeds Are Such A Pain

Updated on May 9, 2011

Have you had a nose bleed within the past week?

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Why?

Nobody likes to have a nose bleed. They look ugly. Unless you’re a vampire, the dripping blood tastes gross. The clot that forms after a while to stop the bleeding makes it hard to breathe. It’s a sudden, (hopefully) infrequent event that we all have experienced at some point and will experience again. Why does it happen? Let’s look at the most widely believed causes.

  • Blowing/Picking/Injury
  • Who hasn’t given themselves a nose bleed by blowing their nose too hard? When your nose is really, really stuffed who can resist the urge to give it a little pick? What usually happens when someone hits your nose intentionally in a fight or you accidentally take a ball to the face? Every day, without knowing it, we are faced with an opportunity to experience a bloody nose. Yet, we can go months without having one. How can this be?
  • As far as a stuffy nose is concerned, it comes down to willpower and being crafty. Can you find other ways to relieve your sinus pressure that doesn’t involve blowing holes in tissues and releasing the beast that is your finger? Or are you so much a creature of habit that you’ll never be able to break yourself of these bad habits? For me, I always resorted to these two options until I discovered acupressure (stimulating specific areas of your body with finger pressure to ease a particular ailment.) Though there are times when my nose is too stuffy for this to work, it usually does. I wouldn’t recommend it for everyone (especially people with heart problems), but it might be worth your looking into.
  • If your bloody nose is a result of an accident, invest in a sturdy facial mask. It will cause people to stare at you and/or run the other way, but it will keep your nose safe. Safety first!
  • Cold Breaking Up
  • I always look forward to having a bloody nose after a cold because it means I’m getting better. Since the block is gone in there, I’ll be able to breathe better and sleep through the night. If a bloody nose can ever be considered a good thing, this would be the time.
  • Dry Air
  • Often, people’s nose starts bleeding after being in a poorly ventilated room. Your nose has been trying to adjust to the bad air. The dryness has dried your nasal membranes out and, as a result, they have cracked and started to bleed. If you plan on returning to this area, it is recommended that you gently swab your membranes with petroleum jelly to keep them from cracking. It won’t smell nice, but at least you won’t get a nose bleed.
  • Hypertension/Stress
  • Having a high blood pressure can cause you to have a nose bleed. When you’re under a lot of stress, your blood pressure shoots up which starts the flood of blood from your nose. You need to calm down and fast. A quick fix is to get yourself out of the situation. However, most of us don’t have the luxury of being able to leave when we feel overburdened. This in mind, your best bet is to take a deep breath, excuse yourself to the bathroom and take the few precious moments that stopping your bleed will take to mediate your pressure down to normal. For people with chronic hypertension, you could benefit from this exercise too.
  • Hormones
  • It is not uncommon for some women to experience a nose bleed or two during “that time of the month.” To quote womenshealth.org, “In a process called vicarious menstruation, surging estrogen levels in the bloodstream can cause the vessels in the nose to fill up, leading to bleeds.” When this happens, you need to stay calm and realize that your nose bleed will stop as fast as it has begun.

If you find that your nose bleeds on a daily basis, you need to go see your doctor. While I explained a few common reasons, there are many more that I didn’t touch on that are quite serious. If you feel that the cause of your nose bleed carries more weight than a cold or a period, don’t hesitate in calling your doctor. To put it bluntly, feeling silly is better than being dead.

Comments

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    • profile image

      hiit 

      6 years ago

      Very interesting hub, regards for posting.

      Ron from Fitness http://www.intervalstraining.net

    • profile image

      Tracy 

      7 years ago

      I second the comment about wheat. My son had chronic bloody noses and no doctor could figure it out, so I just started eliminating all possible allergens from his diet and they went away immediately. As soon as we added wheat back they returned. It's been confirmed over and over - each time he eats it - like clockwork, they return.

    • profile image

      kristine 

      8 years ago

      hey, i've been having nosebleeds for two days now. and i have a fever. the first time was last night, after I vomited. Then, just this morning while I was taking a bath, I had it again and it was so strong! I even stained my towel and left drops of blood on the floor. Is that normal? Because I've had nosebleeds since I was a kid but now it seems so strong and I'm having a fever.

    • profile image

      Nick 

      8 years ago

      I've noticed that pinching my nose only makes it worse.

    • LowellWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      L.A. Walsh 

      8 years ago from Lowell, MA

      Sara, you need to go see a doctor. There is probably a reasonable explanation for your symptoms, but only a doctor can let you know what that is. I wish you luck and good health!

    • profile image

      Sara 

      8 years ago

      I had a noose bleed for 2 days straight. And it takes about 30 minutes to stop em'. Is that normal. My blood is also just pouring out!

    • LowellWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      L.A. Walsh 

      8 years ago from Lowell, MA

      Melissa, it depends on a few factors. First, do you normally experience nose bleeds? Second, could you have bumped your nose accidentally or fallen on it? Third, do you have a cold/sinus infection that is beginning to subside or have you breathed in an abundant amount of allergens in a brief period of time (Cleaning, vacationing in an area with a weather environment different from your own, etc.)? Last, are you under a lot of stress? If you answered yes to any of these questions I would say your nose bleeds are pretty normal and hopefully will have subsided by now. However, if they havent and/or you are worried about your health I would definitely recommend you see a doctor or a pharmacist about this. In the mean time, try applying cold packs to your nose and try to stay calm. Stressing out about this will just make things worse. Hope I helped you. Best of luck to you!

    • profile image

      Melissa 

      8 years ago

      Hi guys,I just wanted to ask a question ¿I had three nosebleeds today is that normal?

    • LowellWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      L.A. Walsh 

      9 years ago from Lowell, MA

      Thanks for the input and the read, BillyBob. Glad you out grew your nosebleeds! :)

    • profile image

      billybob 

      9 years ago

      i had nose bleeds alot as a child and the doc. said it was from over heating caousing blood to rush in my head making my nose bleed what i learned wastaking a bag of ice and wraping it in a wash cloth and puttin that to my neck made my nose quit bleeding

    • LowellWriter profile imageAUTHOR

      L.A. Walsh 

      9 years ago from Lowell, MA

      This is so interesting. Im glad you got to the bottom of things. Thanks for the comment. :)

    • ChaiRachelRuth profile image

      ChaiRachelRuth 

      9 years ago

      I was having chronic nose bleeds. I found that when I cut out wheat and dairy, especially wheat, the nose bleeds stopped. Most people look at me like I have 2 heads when I tell them this. But when I go back to eating lots of wheat based items, the nose bleeds come back.

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