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The Milkman Cometh

Updated on July 10, 2014

Stumbling down Memory Lane

There are some memories that seem to stay with us a lifetime, but they are so mundane in nature, so extraordinary in their ordinariness, that we are left wondering why we remember them at all.

An early morning in bed, the house quiet, the last threads of sleep tiptoeing from my brain, in the year of our Lord, 1953. I was five at the time, and we had just moved into a new home on North 18th Street in Tacoma, Washington. I had my own bedroom, and the window was open on a summer’s morn that promised adventure and excitement. A gentle breeze made the curtains flutters, the birds announced the arrival of that new day, and then a new sound…..the clinking of glass on cement….and sleep was pushed aside completely as I rose from bed and tiptoed to the living room and the source of that sound.

The milkman cometh!

For those of you young whippersnappers with no knowledge of this piece of ancient times, milk companies, at one time, used to deliver milk to your doorstep, and the milk was packaged in glass bottles. After you emptied a bottle you put it back on your doorstep, and the milkman would replace it with a full one during his next deliver.

Like I said, extraordinary in its ordinariness.

It turns out my mother was already up that Saturday morning. She had already done a load of wash, and she was outside hanging that finished load on the clothesline. I’m sure there were electric dryers available in 1953, but we couldn’t afford one, so our clothes dried on the line outside during summers, and they dried on a clothes rack inside during the winters.

And oh, how I loved the feel and the smell of those clothes, after they had dried outside.

Would you like to join me as I walk through that Saturday so many years ago? Well, then, let’s go.

It may be hard for an egg to turn into a bird: it would be a jolly sight harder for it to learn to fly while remaining an egg. We are like eggs at present. And you cannot go on indefinitely being just an ordinary, decent egg. We must be hatched or go bad.

C. S. Lewis

Surrounded by love
Surrounded by love | Source

The Morning

We officially began our weekend mornings by sitting down together and eating breakfast as a family. I asked once why we did this, and my mother told me because that is what “families” do. That explanation made no sense to me when I was five. Today it does.

After breakfast the morning was filled with chores. My dad always had a list of errands and chores that grew longer as Saturday approached, and after the last crumb was eaten from our plates, he and I would head outside to tackle that to-do list. I know what you are saying: you were only five, Bill; surely you weren’t doing chores then?

Well, yes, yes I was. Nothing too tough, mind you, but the concept of doing chores and helping the family was taught to me at an early age. I had things I was expected to do, and the older I got, the longer my list of chores grew. But at that early age of five, I was mostly expected to work alongside my dad as he mowed the lawn, repaired things around the house, and my favorite father/son chore….the monthly trip to the dump.

Was I paid an allowance? Yes I was, and I was taught at that early age how to budget and save. My money went into a piggy bank, and it became very clear very early on that if I spent my money I would simply have to wait until I earned more, no matter how badly I wanted the new comic book. There were no credit cards in those days. People dealt in cash, and they bought according to available cash, and that’s just the way it was in our family.

The average credit card debt in America, per person, is $4,878.

A great home to grow up in
A great home to grow up in | Source

The Afternoon

Again, we sat down as a family and ate lunch, and then after lunch I was released from work detail to play with my friends. There were a great number of kids in our neighborhood, so afternoons were spent wrestling on the lawn, or playing ball, or riding our trikes or bikes, or my favorite activity, making up new games. Rain or shine you could find us outside. As I got older my universe grew, and then bikes were owned and miles traversed, and friendships grew in number and possibilities multiplied exponentially….and it was a glorious childhood.

One of every three Americans is now consider obese.

Everyone knew me in that neighborhood, and the other parents looked after all the kids, and often we would be invited to a doorstep and given a cookie or a glass of milk as our playing continued.

We learned about friendships in that neighborhood, and we learned about community there. We learned that helping each other was not a chore but a basic human requirement, and long before the Three Musketeers coined the phrase, we learned that all for one and one for all was a pretty damned good way for society to function.

Now I lay me down to sleep
Now I lay me down to sleep | Source

The Evening

I woke up one morning thinking about wolves and realized that wolf packs function as families. Everyone has a role, and if you act within the parameters of your role, the whole pack succeeds, and when that falls apart, so does the pack.

Jodi Picoult

Dinner was served at five sharp daily, and everyone was expected at the dinner table. As I grew older, I learned this was not up for debate. I was told that my mother worked hard to prepare the meal, family time was important, and if I was late there would be repercussions.

And that was as it should be.

Weekend dinners were always special, a time to relax, enjoy a nice meal, and share stories and laughter.

And that was as it should be.

After dinner there was more play time followed by family television time, usually for an hour or two, and then one of my favorite times of the day….being tucked into bed by my parents. Mom would arrive at my bedside first, checking to make sure I had brushed my teeth and cleaned my hands and face. She always smelled liked her cooked meal with a hint of lavender in her hair, and her hugs spoke of love.

The average American watches four hours of television each day.

Dad would follow shortly, a strong man who had lived a tough life, but his hugs were also gentle, and he would ruffle my hair and always say “don’t let the bed bugs bite, and on his way out of my room he would thank me for helping him with the chores that day.

And then I would close my eyes, and listen to a dog barking, a coyote in the distance howling that eternal cry, an occasional car door close, and of course the soft touch of the breeze as it blew through my window. I would think of the day gone by, and make plans of new adventures the next day, and thank God that I was given such a marvelous life.

Now I lay me down to sleep.

And in the morning the milkman cometh.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      We sure could, Deb, and I'd return to those days in a heartbeat my friend.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      That was ideal living, wasn't it? I think we could order eggs, butter and bread, too, couldn't we?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Debra, and thank you for sharing some of your memories as well.

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 3 years ago from West By God

      I liked this story very much. Yep we had dinners together and always at 5 pm sharp too. My how much changed over a short period of time. You were 5 in 1953 and I was born in 1957 We didn't have a milkman then. You brought some more memories for me to bring up in my story that I just started. I have lots of good memories to share as well as not so good. Thanks for the memories! LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, I agree, and I too find it sad. Only we can change it, and i hope young parents realize that.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      I enjoyed your share on this post. I remember the milkman, the bakery and the eggman coming to our home. I think the food tasted much better back then because it was fresh from the farm or store. The hours of outdoor play kept most of us energized and healthy. It is sad that our children today see little of the sunshine and more of the "blue light" of technology.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Greg, buddy, I knew I liked you for some reason.

    • Froggy213 profile image

      Greg Boudonck 3 years ago from On A Mountain In Puerto Rico

      MMmmm! It has me licking my chops now. You know what usually works in a time like this Bill: sneak into the kitchen without anyone seeing. Pull out that bottle of chocolate syrup and take another look that no one is watching you. (take it from someone who has been busted!) Now pop the cap and fill your mouth and throat with it. Now the same thing with the gallon of milk. Go for it Bill!! Do it man!

      (Hey everyone: Don't you hope Bill gets caught?) LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Greg, right on...the chocolate milk was the best I've ever tasted. Sigh! I want some right now. Thanks buddy.

    • Froggy213 profile image

      Greg Boudonck 3 years ago from On A Mountain In Puerto Rico

      Ah billy, the milkman. I used to always say "Hi Dad"! (LOL) Sorry Mom, I just couldn't resist.

      Great memories! The milk tasted so much better coming from those bottles; the chocolate milk was superb.

      Thank you for the reminder.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Genna...thank you so much. I enjoy looking back and separating fact from fiction...and learning from the past is always, I believe, a worthwhile undertaking.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      I love your titles, Bill; they always pull me in. Your articles keep me there, constantly interested and wanting to read more. I enjoyed this “stumble” down memory lane very much. The milkman was a bit before my time, but I remember my country chores as a tyke, and going with Dad into town to buy a comic book or a piece of licorice with my treasured allowance of nickels and/or dimes. Meal times were always at the table with family…no exceptions. Well, until the teen years arrived; then, it became a bit more sporadic. :-) I loved this true wealth of memories…thank you for sharing.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nadine, I think those values were quite common a few decades ago...not so much today, and I find that sad.

      Thanks for sharing part of your story.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, maybe you should write that hub...at least I would be interested in it. :)

      I hope you are well my dear. Thanks for spending part of your weekend with me.

      blessings always

      bill

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 3 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      Loved reading about your childhood Billy, especially about the milk bottle. Your story is very uncannily similar to mine and my sister and I also got paid for our chores we had to do every Saturday. I was brought up in Holland but some family values must be universal.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Beautifully written, dear Bill. Thank you for taking us for a walk down Memory Lane. I do remember at a very young age for just a bit the milkman delivering milk and then ... no longer. There is a sweetness in memories, even though there were tough times, and even so, I cherish those precious childhood memories of a different time.

      My mom and dad did not have much money, and so I wound up paying for my own little, sweet wedding by working at the A & P Grocery store as a cashier and I saved up a whopping $600.00 which paid for the entire wedding! Believe it or not. If I could go back in time and had all the money in the world, I would not change a thing : ) Maybe I should write a hub on how to have a sweet and beautiful, yet frugal wedding. lol

      Blessings always

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mona, we are the ones who document the past. It is our job as writers to be the voice of history, and to make sure it is documented correctly. Thank you my friend and have a wonderful weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You betcha, vkwok...thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alicia, it's interesting that you say that. I have a hub in the back of my mind that will address that point. Thank you.

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      As a child living in Los Angeles I fondly remember the milkman. I love how you go from the milkman to stories about what life and what childhood was like at that time. You are right, memories like these should be documented, because our children don't know them and their lives today are so very, very different. Memory is precious, and it is history.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for sharing with us these awesome memories, Bill!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      These are lovely memories, Bill. Some of them are my memories too, including the story of the milkman. It's natural for customs to change as the years pass, but I think our present societies have lost some habits that had great value.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vellur, if I took you back, and you got good memories too, then my job as a writer is done. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Eddy. I suspect there are many of us who remember those days fondly. I am trying to return to them slowly....I just think it will be best if I do so.

      love from Olympia

      billy

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks, Frank! At times it seems like it was fiction, so far removed from today's world.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      pramodgokhale, thank you for sharing your experience. I wish we could bring back those days, my friend.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      A beautiful trip down memory lane with warm loving memories relived. Took me back to memories of my childhood. Enjoyed reading and voted up.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Such a warm and beautiful journey down Memory Lane Billy ; brilliant !!!!

      I can just picture you now that five year old little boy helping Dad with his chores and then being given an allowance. How right your parents were to encourage you to use money well even back at that tender age. This was a truly wonderful read and as always Billy told in your own natural style. Loved it and voting up for sure. Lots of love to you from my little corner of Wales.

      Eddy.

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      Frank Atanacio 3 years ago from Shelton

      your trip down memory lane is like living a life of fiction, enjoyed the refrences and enjoyed the details voted up and wonderful :)

    • pramodgokhale profile image

      pramodgokhale 3 years ago from Pune( India)

      Sir,

      We were in dairy business for generations and used to distribute milk to people or home delivery. People used to wait at 5 to 6 a.m. for milk because it was fresh product to make tea , Indians are still prefer morning tea at early morning.Down memory lane , it is right, now in India we buy milk pouches in polythene bags of 1 liter. I was born in joint family and had relations with cousins for long. We migrated to large cities and now in isolation i recollect my past days of childhood.

      Nice articles sir.

      pramodgokhale

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Poolman, it may have changed, but I'm pretty sure it would do us some good if we could change it back just a little bit. Thanks for the memories my friend. We could have easily been neighbors.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well thank you very much, Dora. That is a high compliment indeed.

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      Old Poolman 3 years ago

      Bill, are you sure we weren't neighbors? We had a double door thing where the milkman put the milk. He used the outside door and my mother would open the inside door to get the milk. In the winter, the milk would partially freeze and the paper cap would be sitting on the frozen milk about 3 inches higher than the bottle. My dad worked heavy construction and was gone most of the time. My grandfather lived with us and carried the to-do list in his head. There was always something on this mental list that needed doing no matter what the weather was outside. This was his way of teaching responsibility and a work ethic.

      My grandmother baked bread everyday in a wood fired oven. To this day I can remember that wonderful smell of baking bread.

      My how the world has changed.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Beautiful read, Bill! I like the extraordinary in ordinariness--something Andy Rooney used to create. You do one heck of a job, yourself. Enjoyable!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mike...the way it should be...most definitely. I hope your vacation is continuing...if not, I know you had a wonderful time. Blessings to you and yours.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you John! I appreciate the kind words.

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      Mr Archer 3 years ago from Missouri

      And that was Life as it should be. Absolutely wonderful memories Bill. Thank you for sharing them with us. My prayers to you and Bev and your extended family. May God Bless...

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      A beautiful tale of childhood past Bill. I remember the milkman coming too. Those were wonderful days. Wonderfully written.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Timetraveler....you mentioned the open window. I don't think it was possible to lock yourself out of the home back then...there was always a window open or a door unlocked...can you imagine that happening now?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad you enjoyed it, Flourish. Say hello to your dad for me. :)

    • TIMETRAVELER2 profile image

      TIMETRAVELER2 3 years ago

      This is such a great hub, Bill...as I remember those days, also...not as clearly as you, but still, I remember. What is funny is that we had a little window on the side of the house where, on freezing cold days, the milkman would leave the milk for us...and there were many times when I would forget my house key as a child and use that window to get into the house and then be able to let my brother enter through the front door. Yes, I remember the milkman, and the bread man, and the fruit and vegetable huckster Frank who drove his horse and wagon along our street. How lucky I was to grow up during those days, and how very much I miss them. Thanks for the stroll down memory lane.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      I like how you interspersed the now and then. Thanks for an enjoyable read, Bill. My dad used to be the bread man.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jaye, I was smiling but not laughing. :) I have a friend in Florida who feels exactly the same way you do. Here in Washington, I have never owned an AC...never even occurred to me to do so....what a difference 2000 miles makes, eh? Thanks for the smile...okay, I did laugh.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, just think, the time you spend with those grandchildren will be their memories when they are our age...what a wonderful tradition...and gift...that you are giving them. I now have tears as well....the circle of life is so precious my friend.

      blessings and hugs coming your way

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Wow, Suzanne, I never thought of that about the snails. What a great idea. I remember collecting grasshoppers for my grandma to feed the chickens....made a dime for my efforts and thought I was rich. :) Thanks for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Great memories Miz B, and I agree with you...there is nothing wrong with chores and responsibility, even at five. My goodness, I never once felt taken advantage of or abused because of it. In fact, I felt proud that I was big enough to help out...that meant a lot to me at that young age. :) Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Examiner. I did, indeed, have a great childhood.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Indeed, Kim, and we will always have them. Thank you.

      bill

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheila, we had coal early on, but I was about three or four, and I barely remember it...I do remember the dust and getting black from head to toe one day....LOL show me a mess and I could get in it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Barbara, you had me laughing about the Tootsie Rolls. Great story. i can see all the kids standing around waiting for the carrier to get there. LOL Thank you!

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      Bill - The climate of central and southern Mississippi provides us with the combination of scorching hot and miserably humid summers, and I can still remember living with only fans until I was about ten years old. The only relief was going to the double feature movie on Saturday afternoon since even movie theaters had A/C and part of their advertising was 'Enjoy our delightfully cool theater while you watch your favorite stars.'

      Even with an attic fan blowing all night, the air it pulled inside my bedroom window (left unlocked and open over a screen to keep out the mosquitoes--something most people wouldn't feel safe doing these days) felt damp and warm. The dampness caused me to have congestion every morning, and the too-warm feeling was so uncomfortable it was difficult to fall asleep. Those are not memories of the old days for which I'm nostalgic. Ha!

      After my family finally got A/C (window units in those days), I never wanted to go outside other than during our brief winters! My mom tried to bribe me to spend some time in the sunshine, but I hid under the long sides of the dining tablecloth and read books instead. As far as I'm concerned, the invention of air conditioning ranks right up there in importance alongside those of the telephone and the personal computer!

      Stop laughing!

      Jaye

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      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Bill, you have just taken me back to days much like these in my own childhood, with poor but loving parents and a great family and community. It brought a tear to my eye, a smile to my face and a warm glow to my heart.

      Things were simple then, people had more time for each other, treats were rare but treasured and we had just ONE present each Christmas and then one for each birthday.

      For me, the 50s, 60s & part of the 70s were wonderful, then things started to go downhill. They picked up again at the end of the 80s but that's a terrible gap in between!

      Thanks for the trip down memory lane and the underlying messages within. I enjoyed your shared memories and values.

      Today until Sunday I'm with my girls and my grandchildren; that's when family time and important, treasured values come back as I realise that some of it really did get passed down to them and I am content!

      All the best to you and Bev in what I believe is a great family, from what I've read!

      Ann

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      Suzanne Day 3 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

      A lovely account of what life was like back then. My folks also had similar values to teach me, especially that piggybank one as credit was still an iffy subject in my youth too. I used to get paid to collect the snails by the bucketload from our fences and peel them out of their shells to feed to the chickens. To this day, I don't use a dryer because clothes last longer and smell fresher when they've been on a line. Voted useful! and loved it x

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      MizBejabbers 3 years ago

      What sweet memories you have. I just wish I had appreciated my childhood more when I was a child instead of wishing myself grown. I remember the milkman well because one of our neighbors was a milkman for the local dairy. We had our own farm milk and our excess was sold to that same dairy. Years later in Lubbock, Texas, after my oldest son was born, we had milk delivered for our little milk sot, and to our delight we could get it in 2½ gal. boxes, kind of like a Bota Box.

      I used to help Mama with the laundry in the old wringer washer and it was hung on the line summer and winter. I remember bringing in clothes frozen stiff as a board and having to rehang them when they thawed. Last week we were at a flea market, and there sat the exact model of Mama’s old wringer washer, and even the motor was intact. I was surprised because it was made of some silver metal, zinc perhaps, and was square. All the other mamas had newer round ones of white enamel, and I was jealous. Thanks for the memories, and I do not think five is too young to start a child on chores. I think we coddle our kids too much today.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      That was something else Billy. I could see that it really had its good moments (memories) for you. I gave it a thumbs up.

      Kevin

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      ocfireflies 3 years ago from North Carolina

      And when he comes, so do wonderful memories.

      Blessings,

      Kim

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      sheilamyers 3 years ago

      We didn't have coyotes in our small town, but everything else you describe sounds like my childhood. We had a little silver metal box where the milkman put the milk because he came early and the box would keep it cold until Mom brought it in at around 6am. One thing you didn't mention that I remember was the coal truck coming. The guy would open the little coal chute door into our basement and then shovel the coal from the truck down a chute to the little door. In the cooler months, Dad had to shovel the coal into the furnace to keep the house warm.

    • Barbara Kay profile image

      Barbara Badder 3 years ago from USA

      This does make one think back to an easier time. Maybe because we lived in the country, we didn't have a milkman. Some of our milk was purchased from the neighbors. We did have a bread man though.

      On lucky weeks, Mom would buy cinnamon rolls. That was a treat for all of us. Our mailman gave us Tootsie Rolls and you can bet that the mail was always picked up immediately. We had 7 kids in the family, so the first one to get there got them. The mailman seemed to get a kick out of this. He was a nice guy.

      Thanks for bringing back the memories.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Monis, I'm glad it brought back good memories for you. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      They have indeed, Cecile, and I'm not convinced for the better.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks, Jamie. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

      bill

    • Monis Mas profile image

      Aga 3 years ago

      Lovely memories... Reminded me of my very simple childhood. Those days were truly precious.

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      Cecile Portilla 3 years ago from West Orange, New Jersey

      I enjoyed this hub. Thanks for sharing your memories with us billybuc. Times have certainly changed since the days of the milkman.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Peggy, I remember it quite well...the paper inserts...the wringer washer, which I could never master. LOL Thanks for sharing in the memories.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh yes, manatita, I do enjoy that indulgence. :) Thank you my friend.

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      Jamie Lee Hamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

      Enjoyable read with a message that should be shared. Jamie

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, I forgot about the coal chute in our first house....so dirty....but still....

      Thank you dear friend. I'm glad you enjoyed this. I think you can tell when I really enjoy writing an article. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Jaye, I have never had air-conditioning, but I understand your desire to keep it. :) Thanks, and I, too, remember the ice warehouse downtown, and those deliveries. I miss it all my friend.

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      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Your experiences echoed perfectly my memories as well except that I was helping my mother around the house and my brothers helped my dad for the most part. We always had chores and also family time at the table for meals which was in the kitchen. The dining room table was only used for very special occasions.

      Can you believe that the glass milk bottles only had those paper inserts? No need back then for sealed packaging due to the threat of being poisoned by total strangers!

      My mother's wringer washer and stationery tubs were in the basement. Hauling up those baskets of clothes to hang on the lines outside was good exercise. She had lines in the basement for those rainy days. I also loved the smell of the line dried clothes bleached naturally by the sun.

      Loved reading this! Tweeting, G+ and sharing with my HP followers.

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      manatita44 3 years ago from london

      Funny thing, living in the Eternal Now. Yet we also find them to reminisce and fill our hearts with joy. A great art which I sometimes love to indulge, and it seems you do too, my Friend. A cute story and a great video. Peace.

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      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I was not ready for this to end. I love it when you go back in time. You are such a beautiful writer. I remember the milkman. I also remember the ice man, we had an ice refrigerator and we kept an ice pick in the block of ice, so we would just pick the ice when needed. We also had a coal pile and it was my job to bring in the bucket of coal for our old potbelly stove. If i would be telling my son this, he would say, " You're kidding, right? Hee..I don't think i ever went to sleep at night before saying the prayer, now i lay me down to sleep. Aha the memories you bring forth. Thank you.

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      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      This hub made me nostalgic, Bill, for a simpler way of life. So many things about our lives were different, and not in a negative way, but a positive one.

      I not only recall the milkman, but the ice man who brought our family a huge chunk of solid ice held by sharp tongs. The ice was chopped into a couple of pieces so it would fit in its tray in our old-fashioned '40s-era forerunner of the electric refrigerator. Mom also had a wood stove until 1952. There may have been a lot of 'mod-cons' missing from that pictures, but there were also numerous annoyances that modern 'progress' and high-tech inventions brought with them.

      Of course, I wouldn't go back and give up modern healthcare or air conditioning, so I must accept the bad with the good!

      Voted Up+++

      Jaye

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, believe me, I am very aware of how lucky I was. I was in nine foster homes before finding my adoptive parents...I avoided possible horrors nine times my friend...very lucky indeed.

      thanks my friend

      bill

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rachael, for sure, ice cream when the budget would allow...which wasn't often, but it sure was special. :) Thank you.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Liz, I know I talk a lot about my childhood, but if people had the childhood I had, they would talk about it too. Like you, I had a wonderful time as a kid, and I miss those simpler days. Thanks for sharing your memories.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lea, I can't imagine having a more loyal follower than you. Thank you my friend. Enjoy your time at Barnes & Noble. What better way to spend a day than at a bookstore? Blessings always.

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      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      What a lovely publish. Gosh, darn, I feel like I have just watched a show

      of "Leave It To Beaver". Simplicity at its best, is quite extraordinary to

      others who cannot relate to a single phrase of this article. We are

      embarrassed to step forward and say that our lives had none of these

      wholesome events. Yours is an entirely different world than what some of us experienced.

      Thank you for sharing this little slice of extraordinarily wonderful ordinary life. You were a very fortunate little boy to end up with a loving family.

      DJ.

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      Rachael O'Halloran 3 years ago from United States

      I remember the milkman's deliveries well. Sometimes we got real cream added to delivery when the cash flow was good. Thanks for the trip down memory lane :)

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      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      Wonderful hub, Bill. It sounds very much like my childhood. I remember our entire block had kids playing in the street of the cul-de-sac and any of us kids can go into any house without knocking. It's just the way it was. Nowadays, it's sad, because it's so different, and if a kid walks into your house and scrapes his knee, everyone is sue- happy! Back then, we had cuts and bruises from playing all day, but we put a bandaid on and went back out. I loved my childhood and wouldn't trade it for anything. Thanks for the flashback!

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      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      Hi Billy Buc. I am at Barnes & Noble

      Just read this terrific hub, loved it Very nostalgic. We also had a milkman I remember very clearly. I sure miss those simple days. Thanks for taking us back in time. I could picture everything that you wrote. Blessings, Sparklea. Sending this from my iPhone. I will be emailing you within the next couple days. I brought two of your printed hubs here with me today.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Eric, that sounds like a smart dairy farmer to me. :) Thanks my friend.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you ChitrangadaSharan, I'm glad you enjoyed this look back.

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      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      So few things were different for me they are not worth mentioning. Except no milkman for us, my dad inspected his dairy and decided against his milk, hihihihi.

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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      How beautiful!

      I can relate to those times. People were happy and content even with small means. You took me back to those happier times.

      Thanks for sharing your wonderful memories!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks DDE. I'm glad you enjoyed this.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I'm laughing, because it was the same in our neighborhood. There was no way for me to misbehave and not be found out. There was a pipeline of information that seemed to move at the speed of light. LOL Too funny. Thanks for the laugh my friend.

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      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Interesting and is great to down that path again.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Colleen, if they want it they can have it. I believe that. Our family is returning to that lifestyle...and others can as well. Thank you for visiting me from the UK.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Randi, good memories, good to go....zoom zoom home for a delicious lunch with great company....sigh..thanks for sharing your experience.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, thanks breakfastpop....I think we both turned out pretty good my friend.

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      It's so good to reminisce about the past. I can still hear the rattling of milk bottles at 6 am in the morning reminding me that in a couple of hours I'll have to get out of bed and get ready for school.

      How on earth did our parents managed to live within their means, I remember thinking that credit cards would never catch on, how wrong I was, and back then, they knew that it took a village to raise a child. I remember misbehaving on the way from school, my parents knew all the details long before I got home, some achievement, considering this was way before mobile phones. Bill, a great write on looking back. Hope you're having a wonderful day, my best always.

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      Colleen Swan 3 years ago from County Durham

      Lovely to read these memories. I am from the U.S.A now living in the UK, so I am often reminded of way things used to be, and many people want those days to return.

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      Randi Benlulu 3 years ago from Mesa, AZ

      What a wonderful stroll it was! I was recently reminiscing about the typical Saturday lunch we had. Saturday morning v was grocery shopping which meant fresh deli sandwiches, cole slaw, potato chips and if we were really good, all 3 girls would get to share a can of "pop"

      Thank you for this. Up and awesome!

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      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      I thoroughly enjoyed walking down memory lane with you. No wonder you turned out so well! Voted up, interesting, useful, beautiful and awesome.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, it is not only amazing but I think harmful today. There were many things right about the way we grew up....and parents would do well to start raising kids with some of those same values. :) Thanks for joining me this morning.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, I'm going to get as many of them back as I can. I refuse to believe that modern society is the best way to live. :) Thank you my friend.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad you enjoyed it, Sha. We recently started buying our milk in glass bottles again. We are definitely anti-plastic in this house. :)

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      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      Bill I loved this and also Leo Buscaglia. We were taught the value of money and saving meant we could buy something...or continue saving. I remember wanting more clothes..saved and bought a sewing machine. Fabric was very cheap then.

      I saved money to go away to college because me parents couldn't afford it. TO this day I still think about spending and making sure it is affordable. Though I didn't have daily chores--we did the dishes and kept our rooms clean. I worked after school through most of highschool. Amazing how different it is today.. Kids want and they get.

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      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      What a beautiful walk down memory lane and you described it so perfectly that I could truly close my eyes and picture it. This were the days my friend and wish we could get a bit of it back, but I guess it is just what memories are indeed made of. Happy Thursday!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sally, how lovely to see you here. Thank you, and I love your memories as well. I can just see those little birds picking at the foil....brilliant.

      bill