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The Modern Rubber Condom

Updated on March 2, 2009

 The condom for the penis is ancient.

Granted, it usually made of leather into a small pouch or cup. Must have been totally disgusting. It was like that for centuries. The modern day condom first originated in the US during the 1870s when a crepe rubber was used and smelled\ deteriorated within three months. It was not until the late 1920's when latex condoms revolutionized sex protection. The UK was first to sell the latex (tight fitting, sensual) condom to the public but was actually made in the US. This new latex rubber condom could last 3-5 years before is was no longer protective.

These new modern condoms required that the penis be hard and lubricated, the condom itself once on the penis, also had to be lubricated before insertion. When the new condom came out to the public, men generally disliked it as their erection could not be sustained while putting it or worse, premature ejaculation. Women did not like it either because it made achieving orgasm much harder. The new condoms also could break and leak enough to cause pregnancy. These complaints continued well into the 1950s, despite their improvement.

It was not until the late 1950s that the first lubricated rubber condoms were sold to the public. It was cheap and thin. After three years of its introduction, the lubricated condom had 50% of the market.

It was not until the 60s or 70s the ribbed condom arrived to increase the sensation. Yet, the complaints sounded in 1930, echoed again, were the same ones.

Female condoms are available in many countries but not in the US. They are larger and wider than male condoms but equivalent in length. They have a flexible ring-shaped opening, and are designed to be inserted into the vagina. They are called Femidoms.

For the future, there is a gel that is applied on the penis and hardens upon increased temperature after the insertion into the vagina or rectum. After several hours, it brakes down. Another condom being tested is one that is drug treated with an erection stimulant so the man's erection is maintained while being put on. Lastly, there is a spray on condom in development in Germany, that creates a super tight fit and dries in five seconds. My only issue with this one is should the spray liquid enter the opening in the penis.

As one can see, the effects to a man while putting a condom on remains an issue for the obvious reasons to both a man and woman in the middle of hot passion.

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    • MrMaranatha profile image

      MrMaranatha 

      6 years ago from Somewhere in the third world.

      Laughing to death here... Yes LondonGirl is right... the first condoms were animal intestines. When did they start being used? Somewhere way back in history before the subject was safe for talking about publicly... In areas that were agriculture based using Intestines for making sausages was common, and Using goat stomachs for canteens was also common. it is then only a small step for a smart farmer with 14 kids to look at his wife and think... I think she has had enough... better to prevent another child than to loose my wife in bearing... and hence the leap from Onanism to the First sheep intestine condom. :-)

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      9 years ago

      I'd take chastity any day....

    • LondonGirl profile image

      LondonGirl 

      9 years ago from London

      chastity or even syphillis start to look a better idea....?

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      9 years ago

      Ugh! can't imagine using one, disgusting......LOL

    • LondonGirl profile image

      LondonGirl 

      9 years ago from London

      maybe the whole "sausage" thing came from the sheep's intestines?

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      9 years ago

      Well, yes, but my sole focus was on the modern condom in the 20th Century. For some reason, I had thought the latex versions were much older than 1930.

    • LondonGirl profile image

      LondonGirl 

      9 years ago from London

      Weren't there quite a few made of sheep's intestines in the 18th and 19th centuries?

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