ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Travels with Maggie: An Appreciation of the Commonplace

Updated on July 24, 2019

Welcome Back

It’s been awhile since I shared one of our walks with you. Summers are like that, making hay while there is hay to make, whatever the hell that means.

Maggie and I have been walking daily, and we love it when you join us, so what do you say? Put on your walking shoes and let’s go for a short walkabout. Just remember to bring some dog treats for my girl.

Maggie Girl up ahead
Maggie Girl up ahead

A Bad Rap

Dandelions are grossly under-appreciated if you ask me and Maggie. We are big fans of those delicate yellow flowers. Show me a field of dandelions and I’ll show you a Monet in the waiting, as lovely as any sea of bluebells for sure . . . and Maggie loves to roll in them, grasp them in her mouth, by the stem, and fling them into the sky, chasing them as they fall back to earth.

Loveliness and a dog toy, all rolled up in one flower, a flower some people consider a common weed, pulling them out by the roots or attacking with deadly herbicides, all to preserve the pristine illusion of their green lawn, shame on you and you and you and you and …

Anyway, me and Maggie, we love them!

Remember when we were children, holding a dandelion under our chin, looking for the yellow cast upon our skin? That was a particularly enjoyable way to kill time back then. Now we are all grown up and we have declared dandelions to be Enemies of the Lawn State, all nonsense if you ask me, which you did not.

As we pass that lovely yellow sea, I am reminded of how lucky I am. I should have died back in 2006, a result of my twenty year slow-fall into the depths of alcoholism, but somehow I survived and by God, ain’t life great? I hope you feel the same about this gift we’ve all been given.

Speaking of Raps

The horses graze right next to Chicken Town at the farm. Each day I walk along, tossing out handfuls of grain to the chickens, and I am always greeted by the horses, which lean over the fence hoping for a handout. Yesterday I didn’t pay close enough attention and the pinto bit me on the breast. I had forgotten how much a horse bite hurts but man oh man, THAT HURT! Now I’ve got this huge bruise on my left breast as a reminder to take nothing for granted . . . a painful reminder to be sure, but one I will not need again.

Dogs learn lessons like that much quicker than humans, or so it seems to me. Maggie was attacked by a rooster once, maybe a year ago. It only had to happen once for my girl to learn to keep a good five feet distance from that cantankerous bird. Me, it seems to take seemingly forever to learn lessons about things which are harmful to me.

I wonder why that is?

Loving life with my dog
Loving life with my dog

Progress Continues

One new house almost completed while the foundation for another was being poured yesterday. There are now only two empty lots remaining on our country lane and yes, that saddens me, which I know is illogical, my little slice of heaven is mine and mine alone, nonsense of course but still, it saddens me, large cement mixers, cranes, bulldozers, I think bulldozers sadden me the most, large killing machines with no conscience, destruction their only goal, tear down, clear away, push asunder, all for what, progress?

But there’s no stopping it, eh? The first pilgrims began pushing east, and more followed, across the Appalachians, across the Mighty Miss, across the Great Plains and the Majestic Rockies, always pushing westward, always digging out a new toehold, always claiming new territories, and always leaving pavement in the rearview mirror . . . so snap out of it, Billy Boy, and enjoy the precious walk with your precious dog.

Listening to the Birds

I’m not a bird guy, per se. By that I mean I can’t recognize one from another just by the singing. I know a few by sight but no, I am not a bird expert by any stretch of the imagination.

But I do love laying down in a field and just listening to their songs, and laying down in a field of dandelions to accomplish that task is, well, the stuff of Victorian poets. While I practice the Art of Nothingness, Maggie walks around, nose to the ground, sniffing for what I do not know but content in the act of doing. We both are in a blissful state, one of those rare moments in the modern world when doing nothing is a most rewarding activity. It’s during these moments when I allow my mind to simply stop, to absorb all, to question nothing, and to be the instrument of inner calm. Rare they are, for my mind is almost always seeking turmoil, a cauldron of molten dis-ease, seemingly incapable of solace . . . but not on that day, not in that field, not for a few blessed moments.

I suspect others know of which I speak. I hope so. We all want to believe we are not bizarrely unique, don’t we? We want to believe our thoughts are normal, our agitation simply a symptom of our humanness, don’t we? I can’t speak for others, but I have expended a great amount of time trying to appear normal, trying to fit the mold of normalcy, trying to slide my foot into a one-size-fits-all loafer, and all I had to show for it was a painful foot.

Maggie? She doesn’t give a hoot about normalcy. She simply is. Her mind causes no unrest. She sniffs the ground, accepts a pat on the head, and finally lays down next to me, her great quest ended, greatly comforted by the love of her owner.

You tell me which is the smarter of the two animals.

The scene of the now infamous horse bite
The scene of the now infamous horse bite

The End of Perfection

It is signaled by a shift in the wind, the clouds quickening their pace, the sunlight now filtered by fast-approaching clouds, that rare glimpse of serenity as ethereal as any specter in a dream, but I am thankful for that glimpse. The birds cease their song, listen to nature, and from one maple dozens erupt into flight. Maggie and I rise and begin the slow walk back to the farm, past the bulldozers, past the cranes and cement mixers and chain saws, stepping back into reality.

I’m reminded of the words of Matthew Arnold in his poem “In Harmony with Nature:”

“What more could please the soul than to walk free and know no superior?”

I can’t think of a damned thing!

The truck fires up, built Ford tough, Maggie puts her head in my lap, and I steer us for home, a man and his dog, another day torn from the calendar of life, not to be replicated but for certain to be cherished. It’s a good life for sure. I can’t speak for others facing dire circumstances, facing insurmountable odds, hoping against hope for a cure or relief or a stoppage of pain, but for this old man, on that perfect day, it’s a good life, a life which has always been waiting for me . . . waiting for my permission . . . waiting for my acceptance.

Bill

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      13 days ago from Olympia, WA

      Sis, you are so right. The best memories I have of growing up are memories which are really about insignificant events. It was the simplicity of those events coupled with the love that was always present. We were lucky, Sis, to have been there.

      And I'm lucky having you in my life. Hugs and love from your Bro.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      13 days ago from Olympia, WA

      I thank you, Genna. It's always nice having a good friend to join us on our walkabouts. Thank you always!

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 

      2 weeks ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Bro.....This might be the most wonderful, serene walk of all. Just following you and Maggie along, gave me such a feeling of calm & appreciation for nature's beauty. You gave me a wonderful gift of remembering how as a child, I would bring a bouquet of dandelions into the house for my Mom. I'd place them in a small glass of water and make sure they sat on the table, in front of Mom's chair at the table. I'm smiling now, recalling how she would make a big fuss each time and give me a hug "for the beautiful flowers!" And there they would stay until all the water was gone and the little dandelions completely wilted. Funny, Bill, back then, I couldn't have known what a precious memory that simple gesture would be one day. You're right though, sweet Maggie would have known.

      Our walks seem to come along at the precise moment. It's always when reminiscing takes away any stress du jour. And Maggie's wonderful attitude reminds us of what really matters.

      Peace, Bro. Till next time, Love, Sis

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 

      2 weeks ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Love these walkabouts. They bring life and meaning to the phrase, "a breath of fresh air." I remember the dandelions under the chin (along with Butterups), and the white floaties we used to blow into the air. Progress and pavement seem to go hand in hand. Maggie is right -- as long as there is ground to sniff, moments of bliss in the magic of "what is," we are lucky. And we can't ask for more. Beautiful write, Bill.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Rodric, that would make a nightmare of a puzzle. lol Yes, Clueless....for whatever reason, I love Silverstone the actress. I wonder what she's up to these days.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Sha! For whatever reason, I had forgotten the butter part of that. I remember holding them under our chins, but couldn't remember why we did it. lol

    • Rodric29 profile image

      Rodric Anthony 

      3 weeks ago from Peoria, Arizona

      Reading this article again, your referral to the dandelions as a Monet put me in the mind of the movie Clueless when the actress Alicia Silverstone's charact says, "She’s a full-on Monet. It’s like a painting, see? From far away, it’s okay. But up close, it’s a big old mess.”

      Now, I figure that is not what you meant. I could not help but have that repeating in my mind, though. Up close I bet the dandelions looked like... well, dandelions, But far away it might have looked like a sea of white or yellow--a priceless still to behold if put on canvas. Would make a good 1000 piece puzzle too.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 

      3 weeks ago from Central Florida

      Ah, the simple things in life, right Bill? I enjoyed this lackadaisical walk with you and Maggie. I especially enjoyed lying in the dandelions, listening to the symphony of peace sung by Nature's perfect beings.

      I also enjoyed the video in this article. I'm aware that dandelions are edible, but had no idea how many health benefits they possess. I'll have to learn more about them.

      When we were little, we'd hold buttercups under each others' chins to see if we liked butter. If yellow showed, the answer was yes!

      Great walk, Bill. Thanks for bringing us along.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Zulma, and I'm happy to hear you are on the mend.

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 

      3 weeks ago from United Kingdom

      Not exactly a string I wish to add to my bow. lol

      The heatwave broke a few days ago. My husband said the sudden change in the weather probably brought it on. Anyway, I'm much better now and really getting into 'Shadows'.

      Have a good weekend, Bill

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      A cold in that heat, Zulma! Nicely done! lol That's hard to do, so you have talent. :) Enjoy the book and feel better soon!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      No, not building a house, Jo. I think we'll stay in the one we are in. We may build a cottage out back, but that will be the extent of my building.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Alyssa, you are a woman after my own heart. I love that you love laying in the grass, and I especially love that you name your visitors. :) That is a classic, my friend, and you continue to confirm my original impression of you...you are quality people!!!! Thank you!

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 

      3 weeks ago from United Kingdom

      Bill, you are too kind. I'm dealing with a cold, can you believe it, so letting the family deal with the housework while I rest. Perfect opportunity to lose myself in the world of 'Shadows.'

      Have a healthy day.

    • jo miller profile image

      Jo Miller 

      3 weeks ago from Tennessee

      If you listen to enough birds, you'll be able to identify their sounds. One of the benefits of living in the country.

      Are you building a house.

    • Alyssa Nichol profile image

      Alyssa 

      3 weeks ago from Ohio

      What a wonderful walk! I'm not a huge fan of Dandelions myself, but they grow in our yard, helped by the fact that my son and I love to go outside and pick the 'dandelion wishes,' as we call them, and blow them all over the yard. haha! It's Poison Ivy that gets under my skin the most.. it's the most persistent of plants, I think, and an inspiration if you change your perspective on it. (I'm working on a poem for that .. coming soon.) But I don't take the easy way when it comes to them.. I suit up and put my back through the wringer to get rid of it for a few weeks. It always returns of course, stronger than ever, laughing at me. :) I love just laying in the grass, looking up at the clouds.. and bird (and creature) watching is a bit of a hobby for me... Our frequent visitors all get names (Penny and Henry for our hummingbirds; Winston, the bird with a distinctive call that I have yet to identify; Lady and Red, our Cardinals; The Percy's, our woodchuck family; Flower, our security system Skunk.. etc.) haha! I enjoyed the walk with you and Maggie. Have a wonderful week, my friend!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Zulma, for the book purchase. You are true and blue in my book. I'll have to borrow your name for a character in the next one. It will be a small way of saying thank you.

      As for that horse, I now give him three feet buffer space. If he can bite me from three feet away, he deserves his pound of flesh. :)

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      It's all better now, Li-Jen, but thank you!

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 

      3 weeks ago from United Kingdom

      I imagine your father was from a generation that considered pristine lawns, large picture windows and Barbie status symbols. Quintessential Americana.

      As for horses biting, I was feeding a Shetland pony apple slices when I felt his teeth wrap around my fingers and apply pressure. I pulled my hand away just in time. Never trust my Sheltie, that's my advice. Don't be fooled by the small stature and sweet face. Behind that facade is a heart of darkness.

      Happy Monday to you, my friend.

      PS I just got your latest 'Shadow' book. Can't wait to dive in.

    • Li-Jen Hew profile image

      Li-Jen Hew 

      4 weeks ago

      Hope you recover from the bite as soon as possible, Bill!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mr. Happy! Glad you liked the coops, and happy I could warn you about horses. Beautiful creatures but they must be respected and given space.

      Best wishes finding that mirror.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks William! It's a bit surprising the number of people who have said that about horses biting. They are unpredictable creatures, equal parts beauty and danger.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Li-Jen! You are always welcome to join us in person should you ever be in our area.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      I appreciate that, Dora! So glad you enjoyed our walk.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      I will do that, Lori, and Maggie appreciates it. Of course I remember...we did it all the time, sans scolding.

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 

      4 weeks ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      I always enjoy your walks with Maggie. It's so relaxing and enjoyable. And I always learn something new. I never thought about a horse biting before. Thanks, Bill!

    • Li-Jen Hew profile image

      Li-Jen Hew 

      4 weeks ago

      Hey Bill, sweet piece of yours. I agree that cranes have no conscious so I'm glad that your article contains nature and you have lived longer than me to appreciate the days when there were more trees. It's nice to celebrate the simple walk of you and Maggie. Thanks for sharing.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 

      4 weeks ago from The Caribbean

      Simply beautiful, Bill. That bulldozer sentence tore at my heart. So many reflective thoughts conjured up in these scenes you draw so vividly. Pleasant read!

    • lambservant profile image

      Lori Colbo 

      4 weeks ago from Pacific Northwest

      gardening.

      I love the image of Maggie rolling in them, pulling them up and flinging them into the air. I'm not there yet, lol. The yellow is indeed sweet to the eye from a distance. But I also appreciate them when they become a ball of fuzz. I'm sure you remember as a blowing on them and watching them fly into the air. Depending on where I was, sometimes I got scolded because it would spread to someone's lawn. I managed to come out unscathed. Give Maggie a kiss for me.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      That is too funny, Zulma...Lawnmower Man! My dad had an obsession over his lawn too. Me, I just didn't get with the program...ever! Our front yard is a lovely jungle of berry varieties. We just walk outside and graze when hungry. :) No mowing allowed!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Exactly, Nithya! I think we should all return to those childhood activities; they replenish our hearts and souls with good vibes.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      We did have dandelion fights, MizB, and they were fun. Amazing what we could do without a cell phone or the internet back then. We produced fun out of thin air. :)

      The perfect weather continues here. Very refreshing after last summer's record heat.

      Have a splendid weekend, my friend.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      It's still sore to touch, Ann, but getting better, thank you!

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 

      4 weeks ago from United Kingdom

      My husband is definitely one of those who cannot abide dandelions. As soon as they appear, out comes the lawnmower. No chemicals, though, as that would damage the grass. I don't mind them much. Once there was a group of them in the corner of the lawn. They had grown in such a nice symmetry it was as if a florist had arranged them in a bouquet. I managed to get a few pictures of them before lawnmower man made short work of them.

      Thank you for another lovely walk, Bill. Here you go Mags. A bunch of dandelions just for you. Go nuts.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 

      4 weeks ago from Dubai

      I love Dandelions, reminds me of my childhood days. Maggie seems to be having fun rolling around in the dandelions! Enjoyed the walk and I hope you are feeling better now.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      Doris James MizBejabbers 

      4 weeks ago from Beautiful South

      Bill, your whole article sounds idyllic, except for the horse bite, of course. Nothing like that to bring a man down to earth. I'll bet you have a carrot in your pocket next time. I have a rooster that attacks the back of my legs after I've finished feeding him and start to walk away. Apparently he's telling me that he wants more.

      I've never eaten dandelions, but they are supposed to be good for you. They are used in herbal medicine and are pretty little things, too. We used to blow the mature ones at each other when we were kids. Did you ever have dandelion fights?

      Fantastic weather right now, cooler than usual for this time of year. Have a good rest of the week, my friend.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      4 weeks ago from SW England

      No need for apologies, bill, and I hope that horse bite has lost its sting!

      Ann

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Rodric, and Maggie thanks you for the treat. Join us any old time you can free up an hour.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Is that what it was, Linda? Liking butter? That sounds familiar. I thought it had something to do with liking a girl. lol

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Heidi! I now keep three feet of space between me and that pinto. Lesson learned!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you PS! One of the advantages, for me, of growing older is a deeper appreciation of this gift called life.

      Those angels must be getting tired...they are heading your way once again.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Not a bad way to spend a day, Peg! No bugs at all on that trip, but I have a spider who is visiting me as I type this. lol

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      You should be dismayed, Ann, and my apologies are winging their way across The Pond as we speak. :)

      bill

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for those kind words, Liz, and Maggie is wagging her tail in appreciation as well.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Sean, without a doubt, Maggie is the smarter one. :) Peace and blessings to you always.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Pamela! That horse bit literally took my breath away. I had forgotten how hard they can bite. I am now very aware, thank you very much. lol

    • Mr. Happy profile image

      Mr. Happy 

      4 weeks ago from Toronto, Canada

      So, dandelions are a sign that the soil is calcium deficient. If You let them die, being rich in calcium, the dandelions will enrich the soil. They also grow in soil which has high levels of acidity. That's also something to think about. I love dandelions - they are fabulous! You can eat them too!

      Nice little story here and I am not sure what to say about You getting bit by a horse. I have never heard of anyone being bit by a horse so, You must be special, haha!! Better than being kicked by one I suppose. I do wish You're alright and that the horse is alright as well. Did You make-up? lol

      Lastly, I love the way the chicken coups are painted - very nice! I'm in a bit of painting myself at the moment, trying to finish some bathroom renovations. So, yes, love those vibrant colours. I wonder if the chickens see colour and if they appreciate their colourfull coups?

      Alrighty, I'm gonna get going. I gotta find a mirror for my washroom and that is making me run around the city. You have a joyfull remainer of a week and all the very best!

    • Rodric29 profile image

      Rodric Anthony 

      4 weeks ago from Peoria, Arizona

      This is a peaceful posting. Wellbeing and satisfaction in the words. Thanks for sharing. I really felt like I was on the walk with the two of you giving Maggie my treat!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 

      4 weeks ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I love dandelions. It's interesting that you and your friends used to hold a dandelion under the chin to look for the yellow cast. My friends and I did a similiar thing, but we used buttercups instead of dandelions. If we could see the yellow cast under someone's skin, that meant that the person liked butter.

      I hope you recover from your horse bite soon, Bill.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 

      4 weeks ago from Chicago Area

      Such a lovely way to spend an afternoon!

      I do think dandelions get a bad rap, too. It's been said that weeds are only plants that we haven't figured out how to make useful. Dandelion greens and wine are a thing (though I haven't tried them). My only concern is that people who have overused or used nasty chemical pesticides and herbicides on their properties may have ruined them as food products. We're just obsessed with our unnatural green lawns. Too bad.

      Anyway, love that you share your adventures with us! Hugs to Maggie and Tobias. And, for heaven's sake, be careful around the horses!

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      4 weeks ago from sunny Florida

      "It's a good day' yes it is. Despite all that may challenge us---every day is a good day.. As a matter of fact any day on this side of the dirt is a good day.... Always enjoy walking with you and Maggie--thanks for taking me along. Angels are on the way today ps

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 

      4 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Spending time in a field of dandelions, what could be finer? To be with your dog who loves you? Ah, yes. Thanks for the vicarious venture into the grass, listening to the bird song, and lolling around in the meadow with no worries of bugs. :)

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      4 weeks ago from SW England

      Actually, I mentioned it in my 'Take a Word...Clock' hub! I'm dismayed that you don't remember, bill!!!!

      Joking aside, I think it's more of a British thing, especially from the 50s/60s as many youngsters now have no idea of it either.

      Ann

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      4 weeks ago from UK

      Thanks fotr taking is along on your walk. You write with such clarity that it's possible to imagine the scene, but the photos are much appreciated.

    • Sean Dragon profile image

      Ioannis Arvanitis 

      4 weeks ago from Greece, Almyros

      No words, my brother Bill! Just a big hug to you both and a bigger thank you!

      Love is simple and normal, happiness this is!

      Sean

      PS: We both know that Maggie is the smarter one! (Chuckle)

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Flourish and yes, that bite hurt like the dickens!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Great idea about the state flower, Mary. LOL And the carrot for sure, although I'm thinking a baseball bat might be a better idea. :)

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      You got me on that one, Ann! I have never heard about the dandelion clock??? I will have to look that one up. How did I miss that??? Sigh! Okay, off to Google I go.

      Have a brilliant evening, Ann, and thank you!

      bill

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Maggie and I are grateful for your company, Linda, so THANK YOU! And yes, my friend, I miss that freedom of spirit.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      4 weeks ago from Sunny Florida

      I have fond memories of picking dandelions when I was young. I still like them but don't see them, unfortunately, in northern FL. I would really enjoy joining you for your walk today. Maggie is such a treasure. Who wouldn't love her?

      Sorry to hear about your painful horse bite. My son got a nasty horse bite when he was young, and I remember it took a little time to heal. The peaceful walks while enjoying nature is wonderful and probably very healthy.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, Maggie sends her love and her thanks for that Milk Bone...as for shooting deer? I will never understand it. Never!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, the human condition...I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in...Kenny Rogers and the First Edition...remember?

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 weeks ago from USA

      That horse bite had to hurt. We’ll take your word for it! The image you paint of Maggie and those those dandelions is adorable.

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 

      4 weeks ago from Brazil

      Regarding dandelions, I think the more you try and get rid of them, the more you have. Maybe they should be a state flower, then they'd be appreciated more.

      Let's look at the flip side of that construction. There will be homes with families who will see a man and his dog enjoying life.

      Next time, take a carrot for that pinto!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      4 weeks ago from SW England

      I love dandelions too. We used to pick them when in seed, to tell the time by the dandelion clock - how many puffs it takes to blow them all away. I've passed this on to my grandchildren. Amazing how many times these plants actually manage the right time!

      Great thoughts. There is perfection in nature everywhere we look and, yes, a day like that is cherished along with many others of infinite variety. I was walking down lots of past paths with you on this one, bill.

      Ann

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 

      4 weeks ago from Washington State, USA

      Dandelion greens are very healthy--right up there with spinach, but that's not the point, is it? I think what's so adorable about Maggie is that she is mature, poised, confident. She knows her job and does it well, but she still has that puppy playfulness in her and isn't embarrassed to show it. Don't we wish we had that freedom of spirit?

      The loss of a tree always saddens me. Stop to think of all they have endured, all they have witnessed over the decades, and all to be wipe away in a moment by the blade of a bulldozer.

      Thanks for letting me join you and Maggie today. I feel that my batteries are recharged now.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Richert 

      4 weeks ago from Southern Illinois

      I brought a milk bone for Maggie to chew on as I traveled along. It was a tranquil walk, all but your bite...ouch! Last evening I looked out my back window and saw three deer, a mother and two babies. I wanted to offer them food, but I knew they would run away. I love deer, how anyone could kill them is a mystery to me. See you the next time you and Maggie take a look around.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 

      4 weeks ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      I gently pluck a few Dandelion leaves for a cool additional flavor for a salad. My bride still gets the flowers a couple of times a month to brighten her car up. They are beautiful. I am not sure but I think Aphids like them more than my roses so they are very welcome.

      Perhaps a bit of the human condition I spend more time not learning than learning. Thank goodness I have the boy teacher.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)