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Vegetarian Weakness

Updated on January 31, 2012
Photo by Joost J. Bakker
Photo by Joost J. Bakker | Source

“But I feel weak when I don’t eat meat.” is a common response I get from people after explaining to them that a vegetarian diet is the best for health. This is because meat contains a central nervous stimulant chemical similar in makeup to caffeine. It is called hypoxanthine. When people abruptly stop eating meat, they experience withdrawals in the form of weakness because they are no longer getting the stimulation that hypoxanthine was providing them through meat eating.

If you cannot bare the withdrawals from abruptly quitting meat eating, you can try a transition diet: eating less and less meat over time until it is eventually eliminated from your diet. When I chose to give up eating meat, after being a heavy meat eater for 23 years, I did so abruptly. I felt a wavering weakness for a few weeks; but as time went on it got less and less intense. My cravings for meat were the same: Intense at first; but now I don’t crave meat at all. As a matter of fact, I am repulsed by it.

People feel fatigued when attempting to go on a vegetarian diet because meat is stimulating. However, some general knowledge about the stimulating affects of meat and how to overcome them can help people overcome their fears.

Sources:

Mollenhauer, John Allen. "Is Meat Addictive." NutrientRich.com. Nutrient Rich, 17 Jan. 2009. Web. 28 Dec. 2011.

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    • Greg Sereda profile image
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      Greg Sereda 5 years ago from Sandomierz, Poland

      Karen Creftor - You're welcome.

    • KarenCreftor profile image

      Karen Creftor 5 years ago from Kent, UK

      Thanks mate will do!

      ~Kaz x

    • Greg Sereda profile image
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      Greg Sereda 5 years ago from Sandomierz, Poland

      @ KarenCreftor: Try this: go to earthsave.org. On the navigation bar on the top of the page click on Resources / Health. Then use control F (find feature) to find: The 'Blood Type Diet:' Fact or Fiction?. Or you could scroll down to the bottom of the screen and click on it. I hope this helps.

    • KarenCreftor profile image

      Karen Creftor 5 years ago from Kent, UK

      Thanks for the link Greg...sadly it's not working for me :( got another??

      ~Kaz x

    • Greg Sereda profile image
      Author

      Greg Sereda 5 years ago from Sandomierz, Poland

      @KarenCreftor: I don't know if "proven" is the right word to use in the case of blood types. Michael Klaper, M.D., discusses the blood type theory and why he has serious doubts about it in an article at http://www.earthsave.org/health/bloodtyp.htm.

    • KarenCreftor profile image

      Karen Creftor 5 years ago from Kent, UK

      Interesting hub Greg. I agree with what you are saying but it's also a case of one-size-does-not-fit-all. It's been proven that your blood type has a huge effect on how you react to foods, what exercise suits you etc. A blood type A works better without meat and with carbs whereas a blood type O needs animal protien and preferably no carbs at all.

      Good points on making a gradual change too~ I know myself that a sudden change is not welcomed by my body hehe

      ~Kaz x

    • Greg Sereda profile image
      Author

      Greg Sereda 5 years ago from Sandomierz, Poland

      @novascotiamiss: I agree with you about supplementation. Currently I'm taking a natural whole foods supplement from Swanson's.

    • novascotiamiss profile image

      novascotiamiss 5 years ago from Nova Scotia, Canada

      Voted interesting! But there's one downside to being a vegetarian, Vitamin B12 deficiency! Our body and especially nervous system needs this important vitamin, which unfortunately is only found in animal products. Therefore, if you go off meat products, take a supplement.