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Why Should I Eat Eggs?

Updated on April 19, 2014
Why should you eat eggs? Because they are one of the richest sources of protein
Why should you eat eggs? Because they are one of the richest sources of protein

Eggs - The most controversial food

Why should I eat eggs? Should I stop eating eggs because I have heart disease? Should I eat eggs for body building? How many eggs should I eat every week? Should I eat raw eggs?

Physicians and dieticians probably receive the most number of questions about this very simple food. Yes, it is the egg. Easily available, inexpensive, easy to cook and eat, eggs are one of the foods that everyone is aware of and it doesn't matter in which corner of the world you are living.

So many researches have been conducted on this very simple food. However, the confusion and controversy still remains. So, should you or should you not eat eggs? Well, here we will look at some simple facts as to why you should include this food in your diet.

Rich in nutrients

Here is the best answer to your question on why should I eat eggs. This very simple food is packed with nutrients. It is especially rich in vitamins and contains A, D, E, B1, B2 and B12 vitamins. It also contains minerals such as calcium, selenium, calcium and zinc.

Eggs are also one of the richest sources of protein. Probably the only way to get higher protein content is to drink protein shakes. The proteins found in eggs contain the nine essential amino acids.

Amino acids are important for the proper functioning of our body. Since our body cannot produce all these amino acids on its own, we need to consume foods that can provide us the proteins that break down into these nutrients. How can you get these proteins? Simple, eat eggs and get your amino acids!

Aids in weight loss

This one comes as a surprise to many people. However, there are a few reasons why you should eat eggs if you want to lose weight. This food is probably the best thing to include in your early morning breakfast. Why? Simply, because it makes you feel fuller for a longer time. So, you don't feel hungry.

A medium-sized egg contains fewer than 80 calories. So, you are not consuming too many calories by eating a hard-boiled egg. In fact, by eating it in the morning, you are providing vitamins and proteins to the body that will help cut down the fat and build muscles.

If you want to build muscles and improve sports performance, you should eat eggs.
If you want to build muscles and improve sports performance, you should eat eggs.

Great for bodybuilding

If you are trying to build muscles, then you just can't ignore eggs. If you don't want to go for too many protein shakes, eggs are your best alternative. If you want to increase your overall exercise and athletic performance and your endurance levels, try out eggs.

Many people prefer going for raw eggs combined with milk. It is supposed to be the best protein shake for building muscles and having that gorgeously toned body that you always wanted.

However, raw eggs may contain Salmonella. So, they is a little bit of risk there of getting infected by this bacteria. The best way to get your daily dose of protein is, therefore, boiling it. You may want to enjoy those occasional fried or scrambled eggs too. So, should you eat eggs if you are into active sports? Yes, you just can't do without them.

What about cholesterol in eggs

Well, some of the things that you have heard about eggs and cholesterol are true. However, they are not entirely true. A correct understanding of the true facts is important here.

It is true that chicken eggs are high in cholesterol. So, if you consume high dietary cholesterol, it may convert into high blood cholesterol levels. However, what you need to be concerned about is how much of that dietary cholesterol is being converted into blood cholesterol.

Studies have found that it is the saturated fat in your diet that raises your blood cholesterol and not necessarily the dietary cholesterol. That doesn't mean that you go and eat three eggs a day. Now, that will surely increase your blood cholesterol.

The idea is moderation for normal people. One large egg contains about 186 mg of cholesterol. The recommended dietary intake is lower than 300 mg a day. So, take a look at the other foods that you are eating the whole day. You are getting 186 mg from the egg. So, limit the cholesterol intake from other foods to lesser than 100 mg and you will be fine.

Another thing to consider is that the cholesterol is present in the yolk of the egg. So, leave out the yolk, enjoy the whites and you will be perfectly fine. Again, you may be wondering: why should I eat eggs? Why not just leave them out of my breakfast? Well, remember the nutrients mentioned above. You will be missing out on a very nutrient-rich food if you leave it out of your breakfast.

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What about heart disease and diabetes

Well, if you do have diabetes, heart diseases, or high LDL (bad cholesterol) levels, then limit your dietary cholesterol to 200 mg a day. This means you take one egg in the morning and forget about taking any more foods with saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. So, you will have to avoid meat or high-fat dairy products for the rest of the day. Or just pass on the yolk to some one else and eat the egg whites.

Include eggs in your diet. If you are healthy, there is little or no risk of heart disease or high blood cholesterol levels. However, if you already have high LDL, heart disease or diabetes, exercise caution. Eat eggs lesser than four times a week and you will be fine. Simply said, stop asking your doctor about why should I eat eggs because if you don't, you will be missing out on a food that is packed with the best nutrients.

© 2013 fitnessfreako

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