ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Beetroot Health Benefits

Updated on July 12, 2011

Beetroot

Beetroot (or Beets, in U.S.A) is one of those foods - You either love it or hate it.

Even if you hate it, you should try to use it somewhere in your diet, as just like the nasty-tasting medicines, the numerous beetroot health benefits make it worth doing.

It's content of Betacyanin is what gives beetroot it's vibrant red colour, and is very powerful in the fight against cancer, particularly of the colon.

Whole Beetroot

Stems and Leaves Edible and Nutritious Too
Stems and Leaves Edible and Nutritious Too

Sliced Beetroot Cooked

Colourful and Delicious (for some!)
Colourful and Delicious (for some!)

Beetroot Health Benefits

Liver Health

Beetroot is also helpful in liver function, producing antioxidants to fight free radicals in the liver, and protecting liver cells.

It also helps in cleansing the kidneys, spleen, and gall bladder.

Cancer

Beetroot is known to be an enemy of Colon cancer. Also the compounds that cause stomach cancer, which come from chemicals called nitrates (often used as a preservative in processed meat) find a powerful enemy in beetroot, especially in juice form. Beetroot juice has been found to inhibit the mutation of cancer cells.

Heart Disease

Beetroot is an important aid against heart disease, helping to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels significantly, as well as raising HDL levels ('good' cholesterol)

Inflammations

Betaine in beetroot (also in spinach and whole wheat) is helpful as an anti-inflammatory. It has been shown to be beneficial in osteoporosis as well as heart disease, and also in cases of Alzheimer's and diabetes type 2.

Birth Defects

Rich in vitamin B folate, beetroot promotes tissue growth. Folate-rich fruits are recommended during pregnancy, especially helping in the development of the baby's spinal column. Underdeveloped, will result in the condition 'neural tube defect'. Folate also helps prevent spina bifida. A large glass of pure beetroot juice will provide the daily requirement of folate.

A rich source of carbohydrate, and protein, as well as vitamins minerals and nutrients, very low in calories, and fat-free, beetroot does have a high sugar content, but a very low glycaemic load (GL). This means the sugar conversion is very slow, therefore helps to stabilise blood sugar levels, and causes no harm.

The belief that beetroot helps in anaemia, is false. This is thought to have come from the fact that it's red in colour, but it doesn't have a particularly high iron content, which is what would be needed to fight anaemia. It does contain some iron however, and is helpful in blood building.

Beetroots can be eaten raw, crunchy and tasty, or boiled soft and sweet, or pickled tart and spicy.

Raw beetroot grated into salads is one option for those who are not particularly fond of the taste. Raw, mixes particularly well with cheese.

Boiled and liquidised, together with the water it's boiled in, makes a healthy juice which can be added to fruit juices, to camouflage the taste without losing any benefits. Beetroot and its juices, when taken regularly, may cause red colouring of urine, but this is entirely harmless, although expected as beetroot is often used as a red dye.

The green leaves of the beetroot also contain beta-carotene and other carotenoids (antioxidants) as well as folate, iron, potassium and vitamin C. The leaves and the stalk are edible and nutritious, and can be added to soups and stews, or chopped and used in stirfry, as well as eaten just boiled or steamed. This is another alternative for those who do not like the taste of the bulb.

When you cut off the bulb from the stalk, leave an inch or so of stalk attached, as this helps prevent the nutrients or the colour from escaping.

Borscht

A favourite in eastern bloc countries is Borscht, beetroot soup.

For this you would boil beetroot with some onion and vegetable stock, for half an hour to an hour, until vegetables are soft. Traditionally you would then strain the liquid and discard the vegetables, but you can blend or liquidise everything for a thicker soup.

Add the fresh squeezed juice of one lemon, and stir together.

Take one pot of natural unsweetened yoghurt, or crème fraîche, and add three quarters of the contents to the soup, stirring well.

Borscht is traditionally served chilled, but can be eaten warm.

Serve with a drizzle of the remaining yoghurt on the surface.

Whether you love it or hate it, there is no doubting beetroot health benefits. Try to incorporate some into your diet wherever possible. If you're among those who love the taste, eat as much as you like, you're only helping your health.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • dianew profile imageAUTHOR

      dianew 

      6 years ago from Spain

      Thanks SherryDigital, for taking the time to read and for the comment. I am always interested in the health benefits of foods and natural alternatives to pharmaceutical remedies

    • SherryDigital profile image

      Sherry Duffy 

      6 years ago from Here. There. Everywhere. Currently: Portland, OR

      Great stuff! I love your hubs. They are on the very same subjects that I am interested in.

    • dianew profile imageAUTHOR

      dianew 

      6 years ago from Spain

      Thanks for the comment editorsupremo and I will certainly take a look at your hub.

    • editorsupremo profile image

      editorsupremo 

      6 years ago from London, England

      Good article singing the praises of the health benefits of beetroot. I drink it every day and have written a hub with recipes you may care to view.

      https://hubpages.com/health/Anemia-How-Beetroot-Ju...

    • dianew profile imageAUTHOR

      dianew 

      6 years ago from Spain

      Thanks for the comment Steve. As stated above, beetroot does have high levels of sugar, but low GL. Best to ask your GP who knows your case.

    • profile image

      steve Otieno 

      6 years ago

      This is a wonderful peace. Is boiled beetroot juice good for a diebatic person?

    • profile image

      RAVINDRA VISHWAKARMA 

      7 years ago

      EXCELLENT JOB, THANKS FOR THESE KINDLY INFORMATION I HOPE EVERY BODY SHOULD TRY IT BECAUSE IT WORKS AS A TREATMENT NATURALLY

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)