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Survival Food Storage - My Favorite Tips and Tricks!

Updated on September 10, 2014
MBurgess profile image

Preparedness has been a passion of mine since I endured Hurricane Andrew in Florida. It is my second favorite topic to write about.

How To Properly Store Survival Foods

Survival food storage ~ What IS the best way to properly store your survival food for long term? Below you will find my favorite tips and tricks. There are some great ways to keep your goodies fresh and the bugs out.

A variety of foods can be simple to store. Some foods only require cool temperatures while others need to be conditioned and repackaged.

Having a variety of good foods available is necessary for maintaining good nutrition in times of emergency and it is an excellent home economic practice. Your family needs foods in stock they will and can eat. It is important in times of crisis to have comfort food and nutritionally sound meal choices.

Some foods have a longer shelf life than others. Canned foods stored in the pantry can keep up to 2 years while foods, such as ground beef or chicken stored in a freezer only keep for a few months. For long term it's best to have survival foods canned or in freeze-dried forms.

Dry packed items like oats, pasta, rice, or powdered milk store well long term on a pantry shelf.

Bulk items such as sugar and flour can be separated into smaller usable bags or plastic containers for regular use in the kitchen and can keep for a couple of years.

Keeping the quality high and the contents usable and fresh is not difficult. Keeping pests out only takes a few simple remedies.

Let's get started.

Image: Dried Pasta In Jars Allposters

Additional images: M Burgess unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Please, do not copy, Thanks!

Food Storage Is Self Sufficiency

Learn To Preserve Your Own Foods

Preserving food with high quality and long term storage potential is an important part of storing survival foods. Canned foods you purchase at the store are good but they may not hold up as well or taste as good as food you have prepared yourself. Self-sufficiency is the goal of food storage.

A fruit or jelly preserved in a glass jar always tastes better than the ones in the tin cans. You know for certain what healthy ingredients are in it because You made it! Meats can be a tricky storage item, but with the right knowledge they can be treated for stocking long term. Making your own goods and being as self-sufficient as possible is an important part of the survival planning efforts.

Food Storage Books - Manuals & Reference Guides

Having a good library of food storage books and references will help you answer the questions you have about food safety, the best ways to treat certain foods for canning or freezing, and generally include some great recipes. Guides for drying or freezing can be an essential part of your planning food storage. There are many methods and recipes. Scour the pages and find ones that your family likes.Those are the ones you use. If your family won't eat the food you set away you have not planned it well. Keep and highlight the family favorites and memorize these menus.

Free Download - Home Storage of Wheat PDF - By Ralph E. Whitesides

This printable PDF document details instruction to storing your most essential grain - Wheat. It has been in my food storage document collection for a long time and it contains many pages of valuable information on using and storing wheat.

The document covers what kinds of wheat are on the market. It also addresses issues like temperature control, common grain diseases, and what to look for.

Organizing Food Storage - Sugar Bucket ~ Image: M Burgess
Organizing Food Storage - Sugar Bucket ~ Image: M Burgess

Large Storage Containers

Organized Food Storage

I use the zip-lock bags for organizing most of my storage needs. These I drop into 22 quart storage containers. What I don't have in bags is already packed in #10 cans.

Using the freezer style bags saves on hassles in the long run because they are stronger, more durable, and will take more abuse from dry packaging, freezing, and every other good use you can find for them. Better yet, use mylar bags and seal them with a heat sealer.

For pastas and rice, powdery products like sugar and flour, divide the packages into several meal size portions.

Pouring sugar and flour back and forth and trying to rotate it is a messy business.

Make it simple.

Pack individual bags into 1-2 pound portions and then set them in a large bucket or box container. When I bring in new product, rotation is simple and cleaner than having to pour everything out of the big container. I just pull out the bags and put the new repackaged goods underneath. Rotation is immediate!

I keep a bag of flour and sugar both in the kitchen for cooking staples and other uses. When I am low on these I just take another bag out of my supply. When I use a couple of bags, I restock the item. Empty bags can go back in the bucket if they are still clean. Recycling is always good practice.

The value of a quality storage bucket is worth it's weight in sugar, flour, or what ever else you might want to store in it. Use one of these handy items to store your scrap-booking or photo memories in. They seal well and can be used in a variety of ways! I prefer the clear ones so you can see what's inside without having to pry the lid off of them.

22 Quart Storage Containers - For Long Term Food Preservation And Organizing

Organizing your food storage so you may use it to its fullest potential is always a work in progress. Storing large batches of staples can be easier following the tips above and using a container that can be neatly stored and located. Label everything you put away so you know what is in it and keep the stock fresh by adding new goods and using the older ones on a regular basis. Incorporate storage foods into daily menus so that your family can adjust to them before the crisis arrives.

Water Barrels For Storage - Do Not Overlook The Water!

When you are planning for food storage, do not overlook water in your pantry and survival planning. It is the essential ingredient to anything a human consumes. You can live longer without food than you can water. Water should be at the very top of your food storage list! Keep it in large 55 gallon barrels if you have the room to store it. If you do not have that luxury, several 5 gallon bottles or gallons in cases will add this necessary element to your stock.

Using A Vacuum Food Sealer

Preserve And Protect Foods

A popular item in your storage plan is a vacuum sealer. This is on my wish list. I know I would probably go through the first roll of film in the first few hours of having it and would want a case of the plastic sealing film. In fact, that's probably not a bad idea!

Seal A Meal's are great for repackaging meats for freezing and is a wonderful vehicle for dry packaging other foods. They are simple to operate. Separate large bulk items into smaller, more manageable packets for meals.

They work on a system where you can package a food item (or anything else you want to seal in plastic) into a pre-cut sized film bag, then using a vacuum air removal tool, and heat rod to seal the bag shut to preserve and protect the item. They are great for water-proofing survival kit items as well as food storage. Ideally you should include an oxygen removal package with your product to add extra protection from breakdown in relation to exposure to air.

The advantage of having a vacuum sealer as opposed to regular zip-locks is the ability to remove oxygen from the product. Sealing various items in the film provided is not limited to foods. Seal first aid supplies, hygiene products, any small pre-packaged kits you can think of.

I would think sealing up a box of crayons with a coloring book would be a great idea for families with small children to put in a child's bug out bag!

Food Storage Bags

What Is Mylar?

Mylar is really:

BoPET (Biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate) is a polyester film made from stretched polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and is used for its high tensile strength, chemical and dimensional stability, transparency, reflectivity, gas and aroma barrier properties and electrical insulation.

A variety of companies manufacture boPET and other polyester films under different brand names. In the UK and US, the most well-known trade names are Mylar, Melinex and Hostaphan.

Source: Wikipedia article: Mylar (BioPET)

Repeat that 10 times fast!

In simple terms it is a heavy duty plastic-like substance manufactured into bags that can protect foods and other items from the elements. In using a mylar bag for storage consider they only protect foods up to around 5 years. The quality and nutritional components break down after that period of time. It is a good idea to store things you wouldn't keep for long lengths of time in mylar. These are very useful when you have opened a larger box of pasta, bag of rice, or a kitchen staple and you want to reseal the product. You can use mylar bags to break down bulk items into smaller portions similar to the way you would use a zip lock bag.

Using a mylar bag to keep dry food quality is as simple as placing the food product in the bag, toss in an oxygen absorber, and seal. For added quality, remove air with the hand vacuum pump. Store assorted bags in larger bins for easy sorting and rotation.

Allposters
Allposters

Rotation For Fresher Food

Prevent Pests

Frequent rotation keeps your food fresher and prevents infestation of pests. The weevils that get into grains have always freaked me out. I remember opening a container of name-brand oats years ago that had been in the cupboard for sometime and seeing a small city of the lil beggars instead of the oats. I swore I would NEVER have that situation, again.

For baking supplies use and rotate them on a regular basis. Holiday season is a great time to use and restock your older baking goods. There are so many goodies you can whip up!

Use oxygen absorbing packets to keep pests away or use bay leaves in items that won't absorb the leaf flavor. Pasta and rice isn't affected by it. For a large plastic bin used for dry goods place a whole package of bay leaves in it off to one side.

It really bugs me to throw out food. Pun intended.

Place cereals in zip-lock bags after opening and slide the bag back into the box. This helps the product stay fresh and prevents critters from getting into the food. The waxy bags are terrible for keeping freshness and they are awful to open. I have to use scissors or the bag gets torn so it doesn't pour out right. When the bag is at about 1/3 or less I pull it out of the box. It's time to buy more or pull another out of storage.

Image: Allposters: Oatmeal

Rotation Ideas

Frugal Living

A great idea for using storage goods is applying household and kitchen staples as substitutes for name brand cleaning products.

Did you know salt and/or baking soda make great scouring agents? Baking soda has always been a useful tool for cleaning. Bleach has many uses from whitening to sanitizing. Used in small quantities it can purify water and sanitize surfaces. Spearmint Rubbing alcohol and water makes an excellent window and surface cleaner. Peroxide is great for removing protein stains

The more ways you integrate storage in your household needs the fresher it keeps. Develop routines. This helps with the budget, too, frugal living is one of the keys to successful storage planning.

Skip down for more on making your own cleaning products.

Cleaning Products - Peroxide ~ Image: Allposters

Warhol - Allposters
Warhol - Allposters

Expiration Dates

First In First Out

Want to know where the freshest goods are in your local market? In the back of the shelf or the bottom of a pile of produce. And that's exactly how you should organize your survival pantry goods. The older items in the front. First In in first out. Restock the new products toward the back of your cabinet. Pick an area every couple weeks to read and update expiration dates. Plan on using them up before they turn.

We all know not to use older dented or bulging cans. The risk of poisoning is greater the older a product is. Don't risk it.

Turn your canned items that contain liquid every few months. This keeps the content stirred and prevents it from caking or forming pockets that will eventually damage the food.

Image: Allposters

Kathleen's Kitchen - Allposters.com
Kathleen's Kitchen - Allposters.com

Treating and Processing Dry Goods

Freeze Or Dehydrate

It is recommended by the experts to place dry items such as rice or pasta, flour, grains in a freezer for a couple of days before storing. I tend to disagree with that as the moisture content will go up and eventually cause damage to the quality of the food though I believe there is some validity to this method.

There is another process that calls for dropping dry ice into your grain buckets, but you may want to make certain you don't want the grain for sprouting or planting later. It ruins it for use as seed.

One of my church lady friends told me to use low oven temperature for conditioning dry goods. Spread flour, rice, or pasta on a layer on a cookie sheet and bake at 200 degrees for about 30 minutes. This helps remove damaging moisture and the item can be stored for long term. Processed in this manner you may now pack the goods into a sterile container such as a glass jar or plastic bottle. Seal the container with a piece of plastic wrap, waxed paper, or foil in between container and the lids. She told me flour treated in this way can last about 20 years still usable.

What is your favorite storage tip?

Above is listed some of the basic ways to store food for long term. Personal preferences and the environment where you live can impact how you store food for long term. Humid climates can effect dry goods. Dry climates can affect the moisture content of certain foods. Heat will ALWAYS damage quality.

Most of what I know came from my mother and grandmother as well as items from good friends. What is your favorite tip and who did you learn it from?

© 2012 Maria Burgess

Comments And Review - Thank you for stopping by!! =)

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    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 3 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      I have had to branch out to all kinds of containers for my pasta and beans. Glass jars are certainly more stable. Thanks for your comment!

    • lowena profile image

      Lauren Slater 3 years ago from London

      I use glass containers in pasta.

    • profile image

      burntchestnut 3 years ago

      Storing food and water is essential. We never know when we'll lose power, get cut off from stores because of bad weather, or live through a natural disaster like a hurricane or tornado. Good suggestions here.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @GlutenFreeGuru: Water is almost more important than food. People do not store enough of it for crisis.

    • GlutenFreeGuru profile image

      GlutenFreeGuru 4 years ago

      Thanks for sharing - the water barrel options are especially helpful

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Doc_Holliday: You are welcome! Food storage is one of my life's passions and something I was taught growing up. Appreciate your visit! =)

    • profile image

      Doc_Holliday 4 years ago

      Some very useful information here. Thanks for sharing.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @chardonnay1313: They (weevils) are creepy little things, that's for sure! Thank you for stopping by my lens today. I am prepared in a few ways but wish I had room for what I really want to stock! Have a great day! =)

    • chardonnay1313 profile image

      chardonnay1313 4 years ago

      That was a great lens you seem prepared : )

      I too hate weevils they drive me up the wall when I see them in my foods, especially my rice that I have just bought from the store. yuck!

      Great Read

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @mel-kav: Thank you!

    • mel-kav profile image

      mel-kav 4 years ago

      Great lens. I love the vacuum food sealers! And I always take food items - especially milk from the back of the case in grocery stores.

    • profile image

      greytdogz 4 years ago

      Great lens. Lots of valuable information. Thank you.

    • lisln profile image

      LorLinda 4 years ago from Denver Colorado

      Well what a great lens great tips and worthy of a purple star Great job!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Fart Pickins: The better we can feed ourselves in any lean time or disaster is an easier recovery! Thanks for the comment and visit!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @erfanstreet: Thanks for the visit!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @fotolady49 lm: I appreciate you stopping in. It is an important home practice to set goods aside. Winter and hard times strike all of us at one point in our lives and the better we are prepared the easier that crisis will be.

    • Fart Pickins profile image

      Fart Pickins 4 years ago

      All of these items are important to research and obtain. It's equally important for all of us to be self sufficient especially for the survival of our families.

    • profile image

      erfanstreet 4 years ago

      Excellent tips for preparing for whatever may come. Love this lens and thanks for share :D

    • fotolady49 lm profile image

      fotolady49 lm 4 years ago

      Great resource lens and very interesting. I've bookmarked so I can come and visit often for more ideas.

      I've been starting to save more food and water for emergencies. You can never be too prepared. There is a lot to know about shelf life, rotation, etc.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @shellys-space: Its always better if the whole family participates. Its easier than explaining why it is necessary! Thanks for the comment and visit!

    • shellys-space profile image

      Shelly Sellers 4 years ago from Midwest U.S.A.

      My husband loves preparing for emergencies! He goes on camp outs with my son a Boy Scout. We have stocked on some dried foods and water :)

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Teddi14 LM: SWEET! Thanks Teddi! I appreciate your support! =)

    • Teddi14 LM profile image

      Teddi14 LM 4 years ago

      Love this lens. I am liking it, tweeting it, and pinning it.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Fridayonmymind LM: If it is a meat product and past the due date... I toss that. Dry goods can be used if they don't taste stale. It depends. For things like a pancake mix, the oils in them go rancid so they aren't much good after the use by date either. Thanks for taking time out to visit and comment!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Excellent tips for preparing for whatever may come. Its important to have survival food, and other things we need. Thank you for the reminder to stay on top of things.

    • Fridayonmymind LM profile image

      Fridayonmymind LM 4 years ago

      I love the way there are tons of practical ideas. I guess I am a bit of a use by date checker but find that sometimes products are still okay and need to assess what the product is and the likelihood of contamination.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @anonymous: Once this is set into your regular routine it is easy to keep up with and maintain. Just get started!

      Thank you Tipi, for your visit, comment, and blessing here! =)

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @ManfromModesto LM: Thanks for visiting! Oxygen absorbers are very helpful.

    • ManfromModesto LM profile image

      ManfromModesto LM 4 years ago

      Did not know about oxygen absorbers. Nice.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @MikeDeHaan: Thanks Mike! I appreciate your comment!

    • profile image

      MikeDeHaan 4 years ago

      Some great tips, and not just for survivalism but also for the "home economics" of buying in bulk and then storing without spoilage. Brilliant.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @CoolFool83: Thanks godfather! =) Glad you liked it!

    • CoolFool83 profile image

      CoolFool83 4 years ago

      Always smart to be prepared for the worst. Really nice lense.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @CampingmanNW: Thank you for your visit today and for taking time out to comment! In the southwest, food stored needs to be protected from heat. In the southeast and northwest it would have to be sealed and stored away from humidity (for items such as sugar). In the north east cold would be a factor. Where ever you live your food storage area should be as stable as possible for temperature.

    • CampingmanNW profile image

      CampingmanNW 4 years ago

      Good lens about food storage. Especially the last line about locales. Climate is the biggest factor in storage. Thanks for an informative lens

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @favored: Warming it removes the moisture, which in turn helps it stay preserved longer. Thank you very much for your visit and your blessing today! =)

    • favored profile image

      Fay Favored 4 years ago from USA

      Good information. I didn't know you could heat flour or rice to make it last longer. Look forward to more tips in this field.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @JeremiahSay LM: Jeremiah, thank you for taking time out to visit and comment! Have a great day!

    • JeremiahSay LM profile image

      JeremiahSay LM 4 years ago

      Really helpful lens with lots of information. I'm not surprised that it did received a purple-star:)

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Aunt-Mollie: Thank you, Aunt Mollie! I appreciate your visit here! Have a great day!

    • profile image

      Aunt-Mollie 4 years ago

      Congratulations on your Purple Star award on this great lens!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Mamabyrd: You are welcome, and thanks for taking time out to visit and comment! Once you get it started it is easier to keep it going. With a large family it is very necessary. On a busy schedule we don't have time to hit the store very often. If storage is planned well, you can go a while before stocking back up on fresh goods. Have a great day!

    • Mamabyrd profile image

      Mamabyrd 4 years ago

      Great food storage tips Ria. I started keeping a well stocked pantry and deep freezer when we started having children. It takes a little effort to keep everything stored properly but it has saved us a lot of money. Freezer cooking has become a necessity in our house since we are always busy. Thanks for the great tips.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @SurvivalFood1: A must have if you are processing your own meats and fish. They can be used for all kinds of things! Because my family is small I like to break down most of the things I store into smaller usable portions. The foods keep longer and they are easier to handle. Storing meats this way is handy. Simply seal enough for one meal or a single serving and tada! Organized freezer or pantry. Thanks for sharing your comment! Have a great day!!!

    • SurvivalFood1 profile image

      SurvivalFood1 5 years ago

      Great tips on home food storage! We just got a foodsaver/ vacuum sealer for better storing our perishable and non perishable foods alike. It was excellent for packaging our pork after a recent pig butchering.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @LynetteBell: That's what someone told my sister. Free protein lol ewwww!! I'm with you there. No way am I eating them on purpose! =) Thanks for the visit and comment!

    • LynetteBell profile image

      LynetteBell 5 years ago from Christchurch, New Zealand

      To get rid of weevils you can freeze the item then sift. Apparently weevils are ok to eat...not that I want to try! Yuk!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @poutine: Rotation is very important in keeping supplies current and fresh. Thanks for the visit and comment! =)

    • profile image

      poutine 5 years ago

      I always rotate my staples.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @TonyPayne: That's a great reason to maintain rotation. Food goes bad. It's a simple fact. If we stock it we need to use it to keep our pantry fresh and maintained. We go through ours now and then and use the older foods in meals then add new product for restocking. Our food menu gets a little creative sometimes but we are able to keep good foods on hand in this way. AND we save money by not losing those foods.

      Thanks for the visit and comment!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @banapple: Your welcome! Thanks for the visit. =) Once you get started it's easy to put a few things together. The weather problems w/ fires and storms keeps me motivated to keep it going.

    • TonyPayne profile image

      Tony Payne 5 years ago from Southampton, UK

      Good information. I sometimes worry about what would happen if there was a major disaster of Biblical proportions, how would we survive if we didn't know how to store foods so that they would last a number of years.

      A while back we had a lot of cans of Campbells soups, and these got to be 3+ years old and past their sell by date. When I went to use them, especially the creamed soups, they had all separated and were unusable, so even cans of soup go off.

    • banapple profile image

      banapple 5 years ago

      Thanks for all the great tips. I have been wanting to start food storage for a few years now. I'm a little behind. I guess any time is good to start, though.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Kailua-KonaGirl: Oh, that's really neat! Many, many thanks to you for this blessing, KonaGirl! I am flattered and grateful you took the time out to visit and comment!

      Breaking the big stock down into little bits this way helps my food storage be a lot more agreeable! What's also good about this is the Mylar bags can be reused as well, if for dry goods. Wash, dry, sanitize, and they are good to go, again! You recycle them, too, for something other than foods.

      I forgot to mention labeling. Include the food label from the package where the expiration date is listed OR ingredients list is located.Tape this to one of the bags. Mark expiration dates on the bags with a sticker or a marking pen.

      It's easy to keep the foods fresh this way!

    • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

      June Parker 5 years ago from New York

      You have given some really good storage tips for survival preparedness. I use large tupperware containers for the 5 lb. or smaller quantities that I use the most, but I like your ideas about the plastic bags for rotation. I have a 5 gallon lidded plastic garbage can that I use for my flour as I bake a lot of bread, but am thinking this rotation idea with the mylar bags is a good one. I do not agree with the freezing method prior to storage, but do agree with your church lady friend. *Squid Angel Blessed* and added to "My Squid Angel Blessings for 2012" in the "Healthy Living » Public Health & Safety » Emergency Preparedness" neighborhood. In fact, yours is the 1st lens to be featured in this category! Whoohoo!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Auto-and-Sports: Ya. Being frugal is part of the investment of Survival Food Storage =) It pays in all kinds of ways!

    • profile image

      Auto-and-Sports 5 years ago

      Interesting thoughts. I am sure we can save money on food this way :)

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @fitnessdad70: Right! Thank you for stopping by. Rotation and storing the foods your really use is what makes your readiness plan workable.

    • fitnessdad70 profile image

      fitnessdad70 5 years ago

      I use to be into backup food for survival until I realized how much was expiring on me and I wasn't using - If I was better organized and I could be if only there was 5 hours more in each day :-)

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @bensen32 lm: Appreciate your visit! Thanks for the link-up. =) I hope more people get on board with readiness and preparedness BEFORE a panic...

    • bensen32 lm profile image

      bensen32 lm 5 years ago

      I like this lens very helpful going to feature on my home survival lens.

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Zebedee32: Your welcome! Thanks for dropping in!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @AmandaTWaH: Thank you for visiting and the compliment!

    • MBurgess profile image
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      Maria Burgess 5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @GuyB LM: You want good food on hand you have to use it! ;) Thanks for the visit!

    • GuyB LM profile image

      GuyB LM 5 years ago

      I've been living off of rations for 3 years in preparation of the big one and rotation is the key. Great information-make sure to rotate to limit spoilage.

    • AmandaTWaH profile image

      AmandaTWaH 5 years ago

      Great lens with TONS of great information. Bookmarking for later.

    • Zebedee32 profile image

      Zebedee32 5 years ago

      Very useful. thank you