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Tribute to a Loving Mother - The End of Alzheimer's Disease

Updated on November 15, 2012

I want to share Mum's last days with you.

I never thought that anyone dear to me would have a medical problem so severe that there would be no cure, not even a chance that the problem would stabilize or become less severe. But, that is exactly what has happened.

There has been much written about Alzheimer's in the past few years but I want to share with you mum's life. She experienced love and laughter until the curtain came down.

If someone you love has been diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease, perhaps I can help you, through this lens, to find a way to deal with the sadness and pain and make the best out of a very bad situation.

Awarded the Purple Star

Thank you for the honor.

Alzheimers With Laughter

The Purple Star Program!

According to the Purple Star Program,

purple stars are awarded to Lenses that are:

* Masterpiece lenses.

* Lenses making a name for themselves.

* Lenses trying new things.

What an honor! Thank you!

~ LaraineRose

A heartbreaking song. - Of course this is how you feel.

Take Action

old friends
old friends

Beginning symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

At first you think you are imagining it.

If you notice a serious change in the mental health of a loved one please do not delay, have a look at the 10 signs of Alzheimers Disease at Alzheimer's Association.

Some of these symptoms were exhibited by mum as early as April, 2010.

Our small family tried to look after mum in her home. It was a 24/7 job and by the end of August we were exhausted and needed help and a facility was able to care for her.

We were very surprised when mum didn't put up a struggle. She had often told us that she wouldn't leave her home unless it was "feet first." It is sad, but mum thought that she was going into a hotel to stay for a while. "We'll be back tomorrow to visit with you," we said, as we gave her a kiss and left. She waved to us from the outdoor patio.

I knew that we would be visiting her every day but walking away and leaving her there is one of the hardest things I have ever had to do.

AD at first may be hard to detect. - It is elusive.

Although one in ten Americans over 65 has Alzheimer's, it remains one of the most hidden, misunderstood diseases the world has ever known.

Because patients often appear so normal, at first, no one believes anything is wrong with them. Even cognitive tests can't show the full extent of its devastation on the patient and the family. Although the stigma is lessening, Alzheimer's continues to be elusive, embarrassing and difficult to deal with.

When AD sneaks into a family, few know where to turn: What caused it? Will I get it? She keeps falling. He's violent! Why isn't there a cure? The doctor doesn't understand. What's an MRI? MMSE? How can the caregiver survive? "I feel so guilty." These are some of the thoughts and feelings that assailed us.

Not every anguished question has an answer as yet, but many of them do. Everyone involved in this overwhelming, confusing disease, although not completely understanding the disease, can learn how to deal with much of it.

When they forget. - We remember for them.

Each one's ability to reach out in a familiar way certainly diminishes when a loved one gets Alzheimer's, yet he or she is always able to experience the deep benefits that come from being in a vital relationship with others. I'd like to share with you the wisdom, humor and life's teachings that led mum and me to connect with one another dispite, or in spite of, this disease:

~ Free yourself of judgment.

~ Love without condition.

~ Be open to receive love.

~ Be thankful that she is still alive.

Internalizing these principles has empowered hundreds of family, friends, and professionals to create moments of connection with persons, regardless of how advanced the disease.

Two videos that helped me to have a positive perception.

"They want to feel alive and loved."

"They look for what home feels like." - Warm, comfortable and safe with love in abundance.

I couldn't have put it better myself.

A different perspective.

Have the two previous videos given you a little different perspective on how to treat AD patients?

See results

Dance - Make a connection.

Alzheimer's Logo
Alzheimer's Logo

I tried to make mum feel comfortable as I helped her to continue participating in life as fully as possible.

Mum loved dancing:

I don't know how many times mum told me the story about doing the dishes as a youngster. As she was drying the dishes, she would dance from the sink to the cupboard and back again .. driving her sister crazy!

So what is the next best thing to dancing on two strong legs. We had wheelchair dancing, I put on some toe-tapping music and I danced around pushing her wheelchair while mum sat back and enjoyed the dance. It was a little tiring for me, but it was worth it to see the big smile on mum's face.

Wheelchair Dancing - Amazing!

After watching these people dance, I thought, "I am seriously going to have to perfect some of my moves."

We Lived in an Irish Sitcom - Laugh--really, it's OK--sometimes things are just so darn funny.

My journals of visits to mum.
My journals of visits to mum.

From Mum's Diary

Humor with respect and empathy, is undeniably healing and therapeutic. Even those who have limited cognition may enjoy gentle humor. Special communication skills are necessary when working with those with dementia. Here are a few bits of our conversations that may make you smile.

One day a nurse told me that she saw mum busily wheeling in and out of a number of rooms along the hallway where the bedrooms are. She asked mum what she was doing. Mum said, I'm putting out the lights everyone has left on. "It costs money you know." This became a regular job that Mum took upon herself to do. She also thought that she owned Noric House and talked about selling it as it was too much work for her to keep up.

Another day when we were visiting mum in her room another resident stopped at mum's door and announced in a loud voice; "The company has gone broke. (Meaning Noric House) and then she added, "They're not getting my money!" When we told this to one of the nurses she told us that since Mum now owned Noric house the staff liked it better than when the last one owned it. She said that mum was nicer and didn't keep firing them.

On one visit mum really wanted out of her seat restraint. (She was strapped into the wheelchair so that she wouldn't get up and fall.) She asked my husband, "Will, can you get me out of here?" Will made reference to it being a "seat" belt. Mum said .. "It's more than holding my seat in place .. it's holding my whole body! If I had a pair of scissors we could just cut this off." She sure didn't like that seat belt!

Mum had many stories to tell me when I visited. One day she told me that she had been staying at a neighbor's home while dad was away. (Dad had been dead for several years.) She said that lots of people were staying at her place but now that dad was home she was going to move there that evening. I just said, "Oh, that's good." That satisfied her and she never mentioned it again.

Mum kept losing her glasses. One day I was wondering if it was beneficial for her to have them on or was it just a bother. I crouched down so that I was looking into her eyes and asked if she could see me. She said, "Yes, and you have a smile in your eyes." I told her that it was 100% for her." She said, "What about Will? There's nothing left for him." I told her that my smile was a 200% one, 100% for her and the other 100% for Will. She laughed at that.

I left the best for the last.

One day when I was visiting mum, the nurse called me aside and, smiling, said that she had something to tell me. She told me that mum's Doctor had called in for a visit the day before and when he saw mum he told her that she was looking good. "Is there anything that I can do for you?" he asked mum. "Well," mum said in all seriousness, "If you have a spare button you can sew it onto my sleeve." It took the Doctor so by surprise that he just roared with laughter. Mum said the funniest things.

Mum loved bowling! - This is a ball she launched. ... STRIKE!!!

Strike!
Strike!

I took mum bowling. Well, not really bowling but she thought that she was bowling.

The care facility, "home," put on bowling contests every Tuesday and Thursday.

The lane was set up in the middle of a circle of "enthusiastic" participants with the pins at one end of the room and the bowler down at the other end. On the bowler's knees was set the lane, a light wooden trough-like structure that angled down to the floor and along a little way. One of the helpers sat a bowling ball on the lane, with instructions for the bowler to hang on to it until she centered it. The resident was then encouraged to release the ball letting it roll down the lane and, of course, it gained momentum .. hit the pins knocking down 1, 2 or all 5 of them.

Mum had a sidekick there who was one year older than her and they had a great time cheering each other on. Someone kept score, everyone got to play and they got small, appropriate prizes when they scored high. (Really, I think everyone won as they all got a prize.)

The last time I was with her at bowling mum whispered to me, "I think this game is fixed, don't you?" :)

Mum's Bowling Certificate - Everybody wins.

Mum's Bowling Award
Mum's Bowling Award

Look what Mum won! - Do you believe it!

The Champ!
The Champ!

One day mum was presented with this nice little trophy. She was thrilled!! It was hers to keep until the next tournament started.

The trophy had a special place on her cupboard next to her bed and we referred to it often. It seemed to be one of the things that she did remember receiving. She couldn't believe that she won it but she smiled when I told her that she was a terrific bowler and much better than me, as my bowling balls always end up in the gutter.

We called her, "The Champ," and she loved it!

Games mum enjoyed.

Brain Teasers

One day we were playing a game called "Brain Teezers."

"Another word for pants? I asked.

Mum: "Slacks"

Me: Another word for pastry?

Mum: "Pie"

We did a few more and then she looked around the room and then asked me.

Mum: Another word for bedspread?

Me: Comforter

Mum: Another name for window?

Me: "Pane"

The fact that she was now asking the questions seemed to make her happy.

Here is another game that we played with mum. She did surprisingly well at it.

We provided lots of familiar sentences to complete with a phrase, word or even a syllable, such as these:

~ An apple a day keeps the doctor _________

~ I left my heart in San Fran_________

~ Happy birthday to ________

~ The first president was George Wash_______

Other games that she enjoyed included taking turns naming animals, words that started with a certain letter or things that a person eats. We chose different categories that were particularly important to mum, such as the names of flowers. She had traveled quite a bit so we also chose the name of places she had been to.. If mum had difficulty retrieving a word, we just jogged her memory by starting the phrase, such as "The Morning Glor__."

The Best Friend's Book of Alzheimer's Activities - This is the best book!!!

"Best Friends" give us a total of 140 easy to do activities to bring out the best in a dementia (AD) patient.

The Best Friends Book of Alzheimer's Activities, Vol. 1
The Best Friends Book of Alzheimer's Activities, Vol. 1

Learn to turn almost any event into a satisfying experience for your loved one and help them retain their self respect.

 
That's me, Lance!
That's me, Lance!

Speaking about best friends ....

Lance is a best friend.

Introducing:

Sir Lancelot - Noric House Residents' Best Friend

Hi, my name is Sir Lancelot, "Lance" to my friends. I am also known as the Noric House residents' best friend. I am relaxed and I stand with my head held not too high or low. My wagging tail is a friendly sign. I welcome the residents to make friends with me. I like being talked to, patted and hugged.

This makes me valuable, according to a doctor of veterinary medicine.

He said:

  • "The greatest problems confronting the elderly aren't physical ailments, but the loneliness and rejection they experience. By providing love and companionship, animal pets (including dogs) give purpose and meaning at a time when the elderly often are alienated from society."

    A recent Better Homes and Gardens magazine said: "Pets help treat the emotionally disturbed; motivate the physically ill, the handicapped, and the disabled; and revitalize the lonely and elderly."

By means of the curative effects that my companionship brings, I am indeed leaving my mark at the Noric House.

I am so happy that I can give the residents' life an added dimension - a devoted life in their midst to care for.

Your devoted friend,

Lance ~ aka ~ Sir Lancelot

Lance's Photo Gallery - Aren't I the cutest!

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Hi!I'm waiting for my pat!I like you too!That's enough now. Leave some for someone else.
Hi!
Hi!
I'm waiting for my pat!
I'm waiting for my pat!
I like you too!
I like you too!
That's enough now. Leave some for someone else.
That's enough now. Leave some for someone else.

Mum has always loved flowers. - Flowers were her passion.

Cosmos
Cosmos

Mum has always loved flowers. I was worried that mum would miss the flowers that she had so tenderly cared for when she lived in her own home. A bouquet of the latest bloom was the first thing you saw when you entered her kitchen. The blossoms at each season decorated her table.

Spring .. small bouquets of sweet smelling violets and snow-white lily of the valley, with larger bouquets of lilacs, daffodils, tulips and branches of fruit blossoms later on.

Summer .. wild sweet peas and grasses from the fields round about. Mum made bouquets out of wild roses that grow in abundance here. Mum also had one third of her vegetable garden planted in iris, day lilies, peonies and other plants I have no name for. She had blooming shrubs of bridals wreath, japonica and spirea. In the small rose bed that graced her front lawn were 5 rose bushes of a very old variety that scented the air with their fragrant blooms.

Autumn .. brought on the marigolds, crysanthimums and wonderfully colored geraniums. Mum also got very inventive with the colored leaves that fell from the maple, nut and fruit trees in the autumn.

Winter .. nothing much grows in the snow, but mum always saved lavender and a bouquet of corn-stock-leaves .. a very pretty decoration as they dry.

Providing the feeling of well-being. - Fresh air among flowers was heaven to mum.

Double Delight
Double Delight

This past summer we spent many hours making our way over a path of dappled sunlight filtering through the branches of the deciduous trees. It was lovely.

Because of mum's love of flowers, when I wheeled her down the paths of her new home she was in the happiest of places.There was a spicy scent of the "Double Delight" rose and the warm, musky scent of the "Midas Touch" shining with golden-yellow 4-inch blossoms adding to the sweet summer breeze. If I close my eyes, I can remember it still, though winter covers the area we traversed and I will walk there no more.

We usually had a picnic sitting in the shade of what mum called, "My May tree."

Mum would not remember this the next day, or perhaps even by the same evening, but for the moment she enjoyed herself.

This is what I could give to her ... enjoyment for the moment. It makes me happy that I could do this for her and at the same time build memories to tuck away for myself; to be pulled out when I need them.

When it was time for me to go home, we ended the day with a lot of hand holding and hugs. I kept on my "happy" face and said, "I'll see you tomorrow. I love you mum." She answered, "Thank you for coming, I love you too."

Alzheimer's symptoms - At a young age.

We have just heard of a cousin who has had dementia for some years and is now in a home. She is in her 50's. It is so sad! I do hope that she is in a well-run facility where there are a lot of activities to stimulate her thinking ability and keep her happy.

Do you know someone who displays these symptoms?

See results

The decorations change with the season - Introducing Noric House

Click thumbnail to view full-size

Books that helped me to help mum .. - Residents with A.D. or dementia

These books provide a sensitive and in-depth examination of Alzheimer's, show how to make the care you give more rewarding and effective and how to help someone caught in the grip of Alzheimer's Disease or dementia to continue to feel loved, respected and useful.

MEMORY BOX

Your help in filling it was greatly appreciated!

This was mum's memory box - All it had in it at first was an empty photo album.

Mum's Memory Box
Mum's Memory Box

I filled the memory box with a number of the items you suggested. Thank you, your suggestions were very helpful.

Your help is appreciated.

Were you able to add something to the list above?

See results

Keepsake Boxes - If you need a box maybe one of these would work.

Give me your opinion please

Remember, the box has to be big enough to hold all of the memories.

Which of the above boxes would you choose?

See results

Happy-Hour with Mum and her granddaughter - Introducing Mum (Helen)

We had just finished listening to a cowboy sing many old country songs. Mum had a wonderful time singing along and clapping her hands in time with the beat.

I know that it is hard but ..

Have you learned a new way of dealing with Alzheimer's

See results

NewTreatment on the Horizon - From the Alzheimer's Association Research Center

It doesn't hurt to learn all you can about new treatments. A worldwide quest is under way to find new treatments to stop, slow or even prevent Alzheimer's. Because new drugs take years to produce from concept to market - and because drugs that seem promising in early-stage studies may not work as hoped in large-scale trials, it is critical that Alzheimer's research continue to accelerate. To ensure that the effort to find better treatments receives the focus it deserves, the Alzheimer's Association funds researchers are looking at new treatment strategies and advocates for more federal funding of Alzheimer's research.

You will learn more about the current research work going on by reading what the Alzheimer's Association Research Center has reported here. Alzheimer's Association Research Center

Latest news

Alzheimer's Dubbed Type 3 Diabetes

A theory that Alzheimer's disease and diabetes are linked has been an ongoing scientific study since the year 2005 and it is now known to have some validity. In fact, just recently, Alzheimer's disease has been dubbed Type 3 diabetes.

Diabetes hinders the body's ability to convert sugar to energy, sugar lingers in the bloodstream, eventually harming organs like the brain.

According to the Alzheimer's Association, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) causes a slight but noticeable and measurable decline in cognitive abilities, including memory and thinking skills, and people with MCI are at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia.

Several studies have revealed a link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

According to a recent article in The New York Times an astonishing estimate of 115 million new cases of Alzheimer's are projected worldwide in the next 40 years.

The cover story in the September 1 issue of the British publication New Scientist offered a detailed clinical account of the topic.

According to Diabetes.co.uk, those with insulin resistance increase their risk of Alzheimer's by about 50 to 65 percent.

Researchers continue their quest to understanding the link between diabetes, insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease.

Photo Credit Public Domain

sugars
sugars

Is sugar the bad guy?

How much is OK?

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends most women get no more than 24 grams of added sugar per day. That's about 6 teaspoons, or 100 calories-a little less than the amount in one can of soda. Thing is, the average American woman eats about 18 daily teaspoons.

Read more: Is Sugar Really That Bad For You?

Photo Credit

Sad News

Mum passed away, October 30, 2012 Age 92

I am writing to tell you some very sad news. Mum passed away, Oct. 30th. As you probably know, she was in a rest home (2 years) and suffered from Alzheimer's disease. I had been going to visit with her every day for a long time to help with her meals. I feel privileged to have been able to do that for mum.

The Memorial took place on Saturday, November 10th.

We had a lot of family and friends come from quite a distance for the memorial so we had open house on Saturday evening.

A graveside ceremony was held for the family only at the cemetery on Sunday at 11:00 am.

This is one of my favorite pictures of mum

Credits:

Photos: Will Borden Inspiring Photography & Digital Designs

If you'd like to make a lens ..

Try it! You'll enjoy it!!

If you are interested in publishing a page like this, it is really quite easy. Just Click Here to begin...open a free account and start your own "lens" here on squidoo .. on a topic of your choice.

Mum had a little white guestbook that she got visitors to write in when they came to see her. Now I have a similar one. I will be pleased if you will take time to write a few words in it to let me know how you enjoyed your visit with mum and if you appreciated this lens.

My Little White Guestbook - I hope that you write in it.

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    • kenneth avery profile image

      Kenneth Avery 2 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Dear Laraine,

      Beautiful; Touching, great read.

      I love this hub and how you wrote it. You possess an amazing writing style.

      I was proud to vote Up and all of the choices. Loved your graphics.

      Just keep up the fine work for you will always have a fan and follower

      in me.

      Sincerely,

      Kenneth Avery, Hamilton, AL.

    • profile image

      cmadden 4 years ago

      As sad as it is to be afflicted with this disease or watch it progress in a loved one, this lens is beautiful and warm and profound. I had not heard of a link between Diabetes and Alzheimer's before this.

    • CoolKarma profile image

      CoolKarma 4 years ago

      Thank you so much for sharing. This is a beautiful page full of emotion.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Gypzeerose: Thank you for commenting. I appreciate the information stated from a nurse's point of view. I read the report that came out last week about the link of alzheimer's disease with diabetes (Diabetes Three). That was a surprise .. perhaps their study of diabetes will help solve the disease of alzheimers. I will post this information plus a few other discoveries in this lens.

      What you mentioned about facial expressions is so true. Mum recently had "Shingles" and she suffered greatly but still smiled. I am a smiler too so I realize that a smile doesn't mean that she is not in pain.

      Thank you for your comments, like and blessing of this lens! I'll be visiting you soon.

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 4 years ago

      "Mum keeps losing her glasses. One day I was wondering if it was beneficial for her to have them on or was it just a bother. I crouched down so that I was looking into her eyes and asked if she could see me. She said, "Yes, and you have a smile in your eyes." I told her that it was 100% for her." She said, "What about Will? There's nothing left for him." I told her that my smile was a 200% one. She laughed at that. " LaraineRose, that as well as so much more on this lens brought tears to my eyes. You were able to talk about a disease that is so heart breaking that as ikepius below said: "words fail" Three other points I want to make from my nursing background: sometimes Alzheimer's patients are called "diabetes three" there is a definite tie in with this illness; Alzheimer's patients can sometimes actually be happier in nursing homes that are set up to take care of them, they absolutely thrive with routine, and three:Alzheimer's patients may have limited facial expressions, in particular they may be smiling when they are experiencing pain so we have to use common sense and treat them as we would like to be treated ourselves. Pinned on my board for senior citizens and the elderly, Facebook liked and blessed of course.

    • profile image

      ikepius 4 years ago

      Words fail me.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      nice

    • teamlane profile image

      teamlane 5 years ago

      Very cute lens Laraine! ~Colleen :)

    • Rankography profile image

      Rankography 5 years ago

      Thank you for this lens, it was touching. It is a debilitating disease but you have provided some wonderful insights. Blessings.

    • lesliesinclair profile image

      lesliesinclair 5 years ago

      Heartwarming is the word that comes to mind, for me. Mum is so blessed to have you for a daughter, and we readers are so blessed to have you as a lensmaster. If you were near to me I'd sew a little satin pillow for you to hold and touch.

    • mbgphoto profile image

      Mary Beth Granger 5 years ago from O'Fallon, Missouri, USA

      What a wonderful lens! Everyone who has someone with Alzheimers or works with people with Alzheimers would do well to read your lens. It is all about meeting people where they are in this stage of their life and helping them to feel happy and comfortable.

      My Mom too has Alzheimers and it makes me sad when people don't interact with her because she is confused. They are missing a part of your life...because that is what this is..another stage of her life. Mom is in a facility much like your Moms and I volunteer their once a week doing crafts with the residents. It has been the most rewarding job I have ever had! Blessings to you and Blessed by a SquidAngel.

    • profile image

      merleannw 5 years ago

      I am in tears your lens is one of the best.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I have never experienced anyone with Alzheimers - it is good to know a good way to deal with it if I do - Thanks - Blessed.

    • vinodkpillai lm profile image

      vinodkpillai lm 5 years ago

      This lens is such a touching experience that drew me in, that I even forgot about the giant squid part! But then how can I? Congratulations on being a Giant Squid!!!

    • poldepc lm profile image

      poldepc lm 5 years ago

      congrats on your giant-squid status

    • Heidi Vincent profile image

      Heidi Vincent 5 years ago from GRENADA

      Congratulations on your new Giant Squid status!!!

    • profile image

      Terrie_Schultz 5 years ago

      Lovely lens. My dad had Alzheimer's, and it was just devastating for me to watch what happened to him. He was diagnosed in 2004 and passed away in 2006. I'm glad your mum is doing so well.

    • SheilaMilne profile image

      SheilaMilne 5 years ago from Kent, UK

      I really did enjoy visiting. It has brought back some bitter-sweet memories.

    • profile image

      dellgirl 5 years ago

      Touching lens, and itâs very enlightening! You did a great job presenting this.Thank you for putting this together and for sharing it.~~Blessed by a SquidAngel~~

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @WinWriter: I appreciate that this may have been a hard read for some as it was for you. I only hope that it helps those with loved ones in the same decline in health to appreciate the time they have left with them.

      Thank you for taking the time to visit me here, commenting, squidliking and blessing this lens. I truly appreciate it!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @funbee lm: I know we will too. Thank you very much for your visit.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @JJNW: Thank you very much!!!

    • profile image

      WinWriter 5 years ago

      This was such a beautifully written lens. I alternated between some tears and some big smiles as I remembered my own dear father and the battle he had against alzheimers. The best thing I ever did was quit my job so I could move back home and be with him. I never felt closer to him as I did then. God bless you for sharing your loving story with us. It brought back some wonderful memories of my Dad. "Squid Angel Blessed *

    • profile image

      funbee lm 5 years ago

      This is a really touching lens, I pray that all of us can find our way through these things - I know we will!

    • JJNW profile image

      JJNW 5 years ago from USA

      SquidAngel Blessed for helping others, great photos, and being awesome!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @newbizmau: I am so sorry that you may have to face the same situation as I have. It is hard but my best advice to you is, "You can't fix it. You have to learn to think only of her and try to make every second that you are with her a happy one. That will happiness to you too .. something to remember in days to come."

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @SteveKaye: Thank you, Steve, for your comforting words and best wishes! Believe me, it does help to know that people understand and care.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @clayva: I am sorry that your auntie has lost the ability to recognize you. Mum still recognizes us but is losing much of her memory and, yes, it does bother her.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @malena10: I'm happy that you are being their friend. At times like these when they are under stress, it is important that they have a good friend.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @pawpaw911: Thank you, friend. I appreciate your support.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Margaret Schindel: Thank you for your kind words. Thank you for supporting this lens.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
      Author

      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Mandy Stradley: Thank you, Mandy!

    • newbizmau profile image

      Guided Abundance 5 years ago from Mobile, AL

      This lens almost made me cry because I believe my mom may be showing early signs of this disease at age 70.

      -Blessed by a SquidAngel

    • profile image

      SteveKaye 5 years ago

      Thank you for publishing this beautiful lens. I realize it must be a challenge, and it seems that you are responding with courage and kindness. Wish you all the best.

    • profile image

      clayva 5 years ago

      Unfortunately my aunt does not know us any more. It was quite uncomfortable for her in the transition phase, as she felt she should know stuff but did not. Now she is just happy being treated well at her facility. Thanks for a great lens!

    • malena10 profile image

      malena10 5 years ago

      Great lens! I have a friend, whose mom have alzheimer's. It's very hard, I know. Great game Brain Teezers!

    • profile image

      pawpaw911 5 years ago

      This is very well done, and very well written. Thanks for sharing your mother's story. Alzheimer's is such a devastating disease.

    • Margaret Schindel profile image

      Margaret Schindel 5 years ago from Massachusetts

      This is one of the most beautiful, heartwarming, uplifting lenses I have ever read, and I am deeply grateful to you for sharing your wonderful experiences with your mum and your wonderful way of cherishing every moment you have with her. Enthusiastically and lovingly blessed!

    • Mandy Stradley profile image

      Mandy Stradley 5 years ago

      I am so glad that mum has such wonderful family support. I know how hard it is to see loved ones go through this. I added this heartfelt lens to my alzheimer's activities lens. I'm glad that you were able to find some ideas on it, and thank you for blessing it!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @raelcalu: Thank you for sharing your love for your mum. I am cherishing every moment I can spend with mum. She is often tired now.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Millionairemomma: Thank you for your visit and comment.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @whats4dinner: Thank you so much!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @BeyondRoses: So sorry to hear that your mum declined so rapidly. Mum is not doing as well now as she was when I wrote this lens but she still recognizes us and still amazes us .. sometimes with her insight and humor.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Tipi, I hope that it is a slow progression. Some people deteriorate slowly and some quickly. Looking back it is easy to see what we didn't see at the time.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @JGracey: I'd love to hear your story. I know that I have been helped by other caretakers experiences and I am sure what you share with us will be a help too.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @chezchazz: Thank you Chazz. I am grateful for any time I am able to spend with mum.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @TheWritingnag: Thank you so much!

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      raelcalu 5 years ago

      heartfelt lens...i miss my mom now, hmmm.

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      Millionairemomma 5 years ago

      Your mom looks so sweet! I see the similarity in you. What a heart warming lens!

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      whats4dinner 5 years ago

      This lens has so much love in it. It is insightful and an inspiration.

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      BeyondRoses 5 years ago

      I hope you still have some lovely moments with your Mom. I visited her page last Jan. 29. I was not to understand how my Mother's decline was so rapid. She died 12 days later, and was buried on Valentine's Day. I would have loved to have tried some of your ideas for her.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Returning to this labor of love with fresh angel dust and realizing I may soon be implementing your love here with my own Mom.

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      JGracey 5 years ago

      This was a bittersweet read for me - my mum passed away 5 years ago after suffering with Alzheimer's. So many memories come flooding back - but you are right. Yes, there is laughter along with the many tears. I may someday share the tale of mom's journey, and mine because of yours. I was never sure I should. Thank you.

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      Chazz 5 years ago from New York

      You have such a great point of view on this terrible situation. My father-in-law had early onset Alzheimer's and remained at home until the end. He died gracefully over the 15 years he suffered with it - bit by bit and day by day. As did we all. I am blessing this lens in his memory and in honor of your mom and your wonderful family.

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      Writing Nag 5 years ago from Colorado Springs, Colorado

      Came back to visit and bless this wonderful lens!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Johanna Eisler: We had a really good visit on Friday! She was telling us about all the gardening work that she is going to do this weekend. The plants are all in the front lobby and mum thinks that she is going to be helping. Well, maybe, eh? She sure loves the flowers. I'm so happy it is springtime!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Thank you for your best wishes. I appreciate that and also your visit. Thank you!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @nickupton lm: Yes, mum is getting the best of care and for the most part is very content to be there. Thank you for the kind comment. I'll be by to visit as soon as possible!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @dahlia369: Thank you, Daria. I try! Thank you very much for blessing this lens .. it is one I built with love.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @ClassyGals: Thank you so much for visiting and the blessings.

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      Johanna Eisler 5 years ago

      I love the trophy! :D It's really cute that she seems to remember getting that, and especially the happy feeling she gets every time someone admires her for her bowling skills!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      A lens full of courage and strength that people have to show in the gravest circumstances. Hope God gives you courage to you and your Mom, life has to go on.

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      nickupton lm 5 years ago

      Fantastic lens. It sounds like your mother is really getting the best care possible. Your writing kept me engaged all the way down the page. Great work.

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      dahlia369 5 years ago

      Touching story but you have a great way to deal with the circumstances. All the best to both of you!! :)

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      Cynthia Davis 5 years ago from Pittsburgh

      I did enjoy your lens very much. Best of Luck to you and mum. Angel Blessings**

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @miaponzo: That is interesting. I'll have to check into it. Thank you for this information and also for the blessing. Much appreciated!

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      miaponzo 5 years ago

      I have treated many patients with Alzheimer's and it is both sad and rewarding.. because with reflexology you actually get major improvements! Blessed!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: I'm so happy that you visited! AJ, my heart aches for you. It is very difficult for family to watch one they love go from a vital, active person to one who needs 24/7 care. Thank you for your visit and caring comment.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      This lens is so close to home. My Mum does not have Alzheimer's but she does have Vascular Damage, so life for her is quite similar to your Mum's. We are lucky, Mum's may forget things but we can soon "jog" her memory. However, she is completely immobile now and totally dependent on 24/7 nursing care - that is hard for her and hard for us.

      Sending much love to your Mum and to you for sharing your experience, which I am sure will help so many people.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @priscillab: It really does help! As I said, it gives mum joy, if only for the moment, but it gives me the satisfaction that I have given her joy, if only for the moment.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @N Beaulieu: It is commendable that you still keep company with your grandmother. I find it strange that some children and/or grandchildren don't want to visit the ill or aging.

      The first rest home mum lived in a lot of "shopping" was done. I don't know what the difference is, but where she lives now, very little is done.

      "Anyone dealing...." Good point, Patrice!

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      priscillab 5 years ago

      Thank you for sharing your story with us. It definitely taught me something. I also believe that laughter is so important and it helps you to remember the joy and love and not focus on what can be a tough situation.

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      N Beaulieu 5 years ago

      You've put together an inspirational lens with lots of great advice and hope. My grandmother had dementia and while her bad days were sometimes really bad, her good days were mostly great. She too was in a care facility and the nurses would laugh when they told me memere went "shopping" again. Shopping meant memere would go into other residents' rooms and help herself to whatever she wanted.

      Anyone dealing with a family remember who has this disease should remember that when their loved one says or does something completely out of character, it's the disease speaking, not their loved one.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @norma-holt: Thank you so very much for your visit, blessing and nomination. I appreciate it!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @teristazko: Thank you. I appreciate your visit and encouragement.

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      norma-holt 5 years ago

      This is a marvellous lens and a great tribute to your mum. Blessed and nominated for LOTD. Hugs

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      teristazko 5 years ago

      Wow, what wonderful tribute to your mum. Beautiful lens. I know it is a very difficult journey, but you handled it with grace. Bless you.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @ReviewsfromSandy: We hope that they find a cure also. It could happen, I know and I keep praying.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @LouisaDembul: I'm sure that you are a blessing to your friend. They still have feelings and seem to enjoy music and laughter just as much as everyone.

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      Sandy Mertens 5 years ago from Wisconsin

      Thanks for sharing this wonderful story about you mother. I have known a few people with Alzheimer. Hope they find a cure.

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      LouisaDembul 5 years ago

      I think it is really wonderful that you dance around with your mother in the wheel-chair! My friends husband has got AD, he is only a little over 50. He is still with her, and we all try to include him in activities and conversation, to keep up his memory.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @yourselfempowered: Thank you for visiting and for your kind words. I appreciate the blessing also. Thank you!

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      Odille Rault 5 years ago from Gloucester

      An exceptional lens! It's been so inspiring to read about your mum and the wonderfully positive approach you have to Alzheimers. Beautifully written and a captivating read. Lovingly blessed by a Squid Angel. :)

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @goo2eyes lm: Thank you for your support. You are an angel!

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      goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      a very touching story about your mom. congratulations for winning the purple star and i leave some squidangel *blessings* for this wonderful lens.

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      BeyondRoses 5 years ago

      @LaraineRoses: Thank you for your kind words. She suffered much loss in her life, and now it still gives her no peace. She remains in her home, as that was her wish, and my brother moved in to be her care-giver. It tore two brothers apart, as one wanted her to be put into a home. More sad events followed. The dreams she had, was to be loved, and for family. Thank you again for your kindness.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @BeyondRoses: I am sorry to hear about your mum's state. I think that this disease attacks people in different ways. Mum still is able to enjoy moment-to-moment events but it doesn't mean that she will remember it for very long. I visit with many of the residents sometimes breaking through to them and sometimes not. All we can do is try to keep them comfortable and happy. That is a privilege.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @BeyondRoses: So sorry to hear about your mum's state. That is what I am fearful of too but for now, mum is still able to enjoy our visits ... even if she doesn't remember tomorrow or even 10 minutes later that we have been there. I guess everyone is different and we just have to do the best that we can and keep trying different things. Thank you for writing and may God bless you and give you comfort.

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      BeyondRoses 5 years ago

      It was a lovely visit with your mum, and I'm glad for her that she still enjoys laughter. My mother's story with this disease is past the stage of any laughter. All her stories, are trapped somewhere in her heart. Thank you for sharing the side of hope, in this cruel disease. Sweet photos.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Kailua-KonaGirl: Oh how nice! I know that mum sure likes to attend the musicals at her home. I think that it is her favorite! I appreciate your comments and agree. Thank you for blessing this lens too.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Johanna Eisler: Thank you for your visits. Do you realize that you are one of the people that I just know will come back every now and then to check on this lens. Thank you. I'll try to keep you up to date.

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      June Parker 5 years ago from New York

      Fabulous lens and I love your choice of videos. Trying not to make this too long, my Mom & Dad (In their 90's) go to Senior Homes to the Alzheimers wings and sing and play music. Patients that haven't lifted their heads or spoken a word since admission, will laugh, cry, speak, sing and come alive when they hear these old tunes being sung. Patience, love and a little attention is all any one really needs. May God bless you and your Mum and a "Squid Angel blessing" for this lens. Have added it to "My Squid Angel Blessings 2012 to the "Healthy Living » Mental Health" neighborhood.

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      Johanna Eisler 5 years ago

      This page draws me to visit it again and again.

      What a beautiful picture of the young nurse she was!

      I got so much pleasure from reading the funny things she says. :)

      How hard it was to realize that the beautiful picture (where she's wearing pink) was such a short time ago...

      Thank you so much for this heart-touching lens. I love it.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: It is so difficult to watch someone you love change from a vibrant, good looking person with lots of smarts to the person alzheimers makes them. The only thing we can do is deal with the 'now.'

      Thank you for your comment. I believe that you are right .. more good ones.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @RaintreeAnnie: Thank you, Jasmine. This is my life right now so it is very real to me.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @SquidooPower: Thank you. I appreciate your comment.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      This lens really hit home for me, as my own mother had Alzheimer's. Many sad memories after her passing but even more good ones.

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      RaintreeAnnie 5 years ago from UK

      Excellent page about Alzheimers. very touching, very real and from the heart. Everyone should read this. Hugs.

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      SquidooPower 5 years ago

      Warm, touching, full of hope and funny. Amazing lens.