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All about Glo Germ

Updated on February 28, 2015

The History of Glo Germ and Fluorescent Germ Simulation

Information from the manufacturer of Glo Germ:

Glo Germ is a product sold both in liquid and powder form that contains proven safe ingredients formulated to be the same size as bacteria, basically 5 microns in size. When used in either the powder or liquid-based form, with the use of an ultra-violet light, it simulates the spread of germs, teaching how quickly and broadly germs can be spread in a short period of time.

Glo Germ was invented in 1968 by Dean Luxton, then of Costa Mesa, California. In 1972 Luxton moved to Castle Valley, Utah and in 1975 DMA International, of which Joe Kingsley is president, acquired the rights to Glo Germ.

In the 1980s a market was developed in Canada with 60% of Glo Germ's product being exported to that country. The market at that point was 100% medical. Now, it is 25% educational, 25% medical, and 50% industrial (restaurants and consumer based industries) and is spread across the globe.

Glo Germ is sold all over the world with primary international markets being Canada, Australia, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh, Malta, New Zealand and many European countries.

Glo Germ has played a major role in the training of patients and staff in major hospitals throughout the United States including John Hopkins University. This facility has in fact made a sophisticated video for training patients on proper personal hygiene using the Glo Germ product.

Major food chain companies such as McDonalds, Burger King, Arby's and Marriott Hotels Airline Catering all use Glo Germ to inspect and train regional managers and employees in proper food handling.

For several years Glo Germ has been providing materials for preschool and day care facilities to train providers and the children in proper handwashing procedures. Glo Germ provides the children with a visible understanding of what germs could look like.

The uses for this product have yet to be fully discovered. In addition to the foodhandling and medical uses, it has been used to train in the handling of radioactive materials by the Atomic Energy Commission and the United States Association of Tattooist which uses Glo Germ to help fight in the threat to tattooists from AIDS.

Fluorescent Powder and Gel Supported by CDC
Fluorescent Powder and Gel Supported by CDC

Fluorescent Training Supported by CDC

Options for Evaluating Environmental Cleaning (Appendix A Elements of the Educational Intervention)

Fluorescent Markers – Fluorescent gel, powder, and lotion have all been developed for the purpose of marking high touch objects prior to room cleaning. While the powder and lotion have been used as part of educational interventions, their overt visibility (lotions and powder), ease with which they can be disturbed (powder), and difficulty with easy removal (lotion if allowed to air dry) may limit their use in a monitoring system and there is little or no published experience in their use for this purpose.

In contrast, the fluorescent gel dries transparent on surfaces, resists abrasion, and there are several studies demonstrating the accuracy of the system in objectively evaluating cleaning practice and quantifying the impact of educational interventions on such cleaning.[4,5] Because these fluorescent markers are all designed to indicate physical removal of an applied substance, surfaces that are effectively disinfected but less effectively cleaned may be more likely flagged as failing to meet a quality standard using one of these markers than one of the culture techniques.

http://www.cdc.gov/hai/toolkits/appendices-evaluat...

Debate!

Hand Sanitizer vs Hand Washing is always a good debate!

Do you feel clean enough after using hand sanitizer?

Glo Germ for Infection Control
Glo Germ for Infection Control

Handwashing Training

From the Manufacturer of Glo Germ

1. Shake the bottle of GloGerm oil well and place a small amount, about the size of a quarter, into the palm of one hand and spread over both hands completely as if applying hand lotion. Be sure to cover hands completely, particularly under nails, around cuticles and between fingers. Wipe off excess with paper towel. Do not let oil contact clothing as staining may result. When using white Glo Germ gel, use same procedure with a pad of gel about the size of a nickel. Wiping off excess is usually not necessary.

2. Place hands under UV lamp to view "glowing germs" that exist before hand washing. Demonstration works best in a darkened room.

3. Perform the FDA-recommended hand wash using soap and warm water. The amount of effort required to remove the simulated germs is equal to that of removing most bacteria.

Again, place hands under UV lamp, paying special attention to thumbs, areas around nails and between fingers, The UV lamp reveals the remaining "germs" as proof of improper hand washing.

4. Complete removal of Glo Germ with normal washing is more difficult if skin is chapped or cracked, indicating that bacteria is also harder to remove. This will require a hand care regime with a quality lotion twice daily and a judicious use of a hand sanitizing gel.

Glo Germ on Amazon

Pick up the fluorescent powder or gel at great prices from Amazon. Shop www.OUTFOXprevention.com for great specials on Glo Germ.

fluorescent germ simulation
fluorescent germ simulation

Surface Cleaning

From the Manufacturer of Glo Germ

1. Lightly dust a small amount of Glo Germ powder over an entire surface area.

2. Clean the surface until all visible powder disappears.

3. Pass the UV lamp over the surface; the remaining traces of powder will glow on the areas that weren't washed thoroughly. When checking restroom areas for cleanliness, UV lamp may be used for the detection of urine without using Glo Germ powder.

OUTFOX Food Safety
OUTFOX Food Safety

Food Cross-Contamination

From the Manufacturer of Glo Germ

Sprinkle powder very lightly over a head of lettuce, tomato or another fruit or vegetable to be processed by trainees so that powder is not visible in ordinary light. Food used is to be discarded after demonstration.

Have trainee's process food using their normal procedure and kitchen utensils.

Use UV lamp to show how the "glowing germs" are spread to hands, cutting boards, knives and to other foods.

Black Lights on Amazon

UV black lights work to show you the germs! Just scan your hands or surfaces that have the fluorescent germ simulation particles for them to light up!

Glo Germ poll

Have you ever used Glo Germ to teach handwashing?

See results

Glo Germ poll #2

Is Glo Germ effective in visually showing how germs spread?

See results

Guestbook Comments - What do you think of Glo Germ or other fluorescent trainings?

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    • profile image

      gardenlady 

      5 years ago

      This is a very interesting lens. I've never heard of Glo Germ. This would be a very useful product to have on hand.

    • benjamindlee profile image

      benjamindlee 

      5 years ago

      Great lens about Glo Germ! So interesting to see where it originated- My mom even remembers using it!

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